Connie Osterman

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Connie Osterman
Member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta
In office
March 14, 1979 – May 5, 1992
Preceded by Allan Warrack
Succeeded by Don MacDonald
Constituency Three Hills
Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
In office
November 1982 – November 1, 1985
Preceded by Julian Koziak
Succeeded by Al Adair
Minister of Social Services and Community Health
In office
November 1, 1985 – May 1986
Preceded by Neil Webber
Minister of Social Services
In office
May 1986 – March 1989
Succeeded by John Oldring
Personal details
Born (1936-06-23) June 23, 1936 (age 80)
Acme, Alberta
Political party Progressive Conservative
Occupation politician

Constance "Connie" Elaine Osterman (born June 23, 1936) is a former provincial politician from Alberta, Canada. She served as a member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1979 to 1992 sitting with the Progressive Conservative caucus in government. During her time in office she served as a cabinet minister in the governments of Premier Peter Lougheed and Don Getty from 1982 to 1989 managing various portfolios.

Early life[edit]

Constance "Connie" Elaine Osterman was born on June 23, 1936 in the town of Acme, Alberta.[1]

Political career[edit]

Osterman ran for a seat to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta for the first time in the 1979 Alberta general election. She stood as the Progressive Conservative candidate in the electoral district of Three Hills defeating three other candidates by a large vote margin to win her first term and hold the seat for her party.[2]

Osterman ran for a second term in the 1982 Alberta general election. She won a landslide almost quadrupling the combined vote of her two opponents to win re-election.[3] After the election Osterman was appointed by Premier Peter Lougheed to the Executive Council of Alberta to serve as the Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs.[4] Osterman was only the fifth woman in Alberta political history to be appointed to a portfolio in the provincial cabinet.[5]

Premier Don Getty appointed Osterman as Minister of Social Services and Community Health when he took power in 1985. Osterman ran for a third term in office in the 1986 Alberta general election. She ran in a two way race against NDP candidate Vernal Poole and won a huge majority despite losing some of her popular vote from the 1982 election.[6]

After the election Getty changed her portfolio to be Minister of Social Services. She ran for a fourth term in office in the 1989 Alberta general election defeating three other candidates to keep her seat.[7]

Osterman was fired from her cabinet post by Premier Don Getty after the Principal Group scandal came to light.[8] She resigned her seat in the legislature on May 5, 1992.[9]

Late life[edit]

Osterman enjoys playing bridge,[10] and has served on the board of directors for the Head Injured Relearning Society in Calgary.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Canadian Parliamentary Guide. P.G. Normandin. 1992. ISBN 0-921925-03-4. 
  2. ^ "Three Hills results 1979". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 26, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Three Hills results 1982". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 26, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Guest Introductions Hansard May 10, 1984". Legislative Assembly of British Columbia. Retrieved June 8, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Famous 5 fact sheet" (PDF). Legislative Assembly of Alberta. Retrieved June 8, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Three Hills results 1986". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 26, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Three Hills results 1989". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 26, 2010. 
  8. ^ Rich Vivone (2003-12-12). "Can a lady in politics be too tough". Insight Into Government. Rich Vivone & Associates. 
  9. ^ "Three Hills by-election". Elections Alberta. October 26, 1992. Retrieved June 6, 2010. 
  10. ^ "The Kibitzer, March 1999" (PDF). Calgary Duplicate Bridge Association Unit 390. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2006-05-13. Retrieved 2006-10-18. 
  11. ^ "Head Injured Relearning Society 2001 annual report" (PDF). Head Injured Relearning Society. Retrieved 2006-10-18. 

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