Connie Osterman

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Connie Osterman
Member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta
In office
March 14, 1979 – May 5, 1992
Preceded byAllan Warrack
Succeeded byDon MacDonald
ConstituencyThree Hills
Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
In office
November 1982 – November 1, 1985
Preceded byJulian Koziak
Succeeded byAl Adair
Minister of Social Services and Community Health
In office
November 1, 1985 – May 1986
Preceded byNeil Webber
Minister of Social Services
In office
May 1986 – March 1989
Succeeded byJohn Oldring
Personal details
Born (1936-06-23) June 23, 1936 (age 83)
Acme, Alberta
Political partyProgressive Conservative
Occupationpolitician

Constance Elaine "Connie" Osterman (born June 23, 1936) is a former politician from Alberta, Canada. She served in the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1979 to 1992 as a member of the Progressive Conservative caucus in government. She served as a cabinet minister in the governments of Premier Peter Lougheed and Don Getty from 1982 to 1989.

Political career[edit]

Osterman first ran for a seat to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta in the 1979 general election, as the Progressive Conservative candidate in the electoral district of Three Hills; she defeated three other candidates by a large margin.[1]

In the 1982 Alberta general election Osterman won nearly quadruple the votes of her two opponents to hold her seat.[2] She was then appointed Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs by Premier Peter Lougheed.[3] Osterman was only the fifth woman in Alberta political history to be appointed to the provincial cabinet.[4]

When Don Getty became Premier in 1985, he appointed Osterman Minister of Social Services and Community Health. In the 1986 general election Osterman won a straight fight against NDP candidate Vernal Poole with a huge majority.[5]

After the election Getty changed Osterman's portfolio to the Ministry of Social Services. In the 1989 general election she defeated three other candidates to keep her seat.[6]

Osterman was removed from cabinet by Premier Getty after the Principal Group scandal came to light.[7] She resigned her seat in the legislature on May 5, 1992.[8]

Late life[edit]

Osterman has served on the board of directors for the Head Injured Relearning Society in Calgary.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Three Hills results 1979". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 26, 2010.
  2. ^ "Three Hills results 1982". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 26, 2010.
  3. ^ "Guest Introductions Hansard May 10, 1984". Legislative Assembly of British Columbia. Retrieved June 8, 2010.
  4. ^ "Famous 5 fact sheet" (PDF). Legislative Assembly of Alberta. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 7, 2010. Retrieved June 8, 2010.
  5. ^ "Three Hills results 1986". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 26, 2010.
  6. ^ "Three Hills results 1989". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 26, 2010.
  7. ^ Rich Vivone (2003-12-12). "Can a lady in politics be too tough". Insight Into Government. Rich Vivone & Associates.
  8. ^ "Three Hills by-election". Elections Alberta. October 26, 1992. Archived from the original on June 7, 2009. Retrieved June 6, 2010.
  9. ^ "Head Injured Relearning Society 2001 annual report" (PDF). Head Injured Relearning Society. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2006-10-17. Retrieved 2006-10-18.

External links[edit]