Conocephalum conicum

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Conocephalum conicum
Conocephalum conicum.jpg
Conocephalum conicum – a thallose liverwort
Scientific classification
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C. conicum
Binomial name
Conocephalum conicum

Conocephalum conicum, the great scented liverwort,[1] common mushroom-headed liverwort[1] or snakeskin liverwort, is a liverwort species in the genus Conocephalum .

A lunularic acid decarboxylase has been detected from C. conicum.[2]

The larvae of the moth Epimartyria pardella feed on C. conicum.

Description[edit]

Conocephalum conicum has very wide thalli which can form large mats.

Thalli[edit]

The thalli can grow to 17mm wide, large for a liverwort. The thalli are very strong-smelling, with purplish margins; a dark green, leathery surface; flat and smooth. There is a set of lines running along the thalli's surface. The air pores, which are found between the lines, are more conspicuous.

Reproductive structures[edit]

Male plants bear unstalked, terminal cushions. Female plants have terminal conical receptacles on stalks, which are shortly lobed.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Edwards, Sean R. (2012). English Names for British Bryophytes. British Bryological Society Special Volume. 5 (4 ed.). Wootton, Northampton: British Bryological Society. ISBN 978-0-9561310-2-7. ISSN 0268-8034.
  2. ^ Lunularic acid decarboxylase from the liverwort Conocephalum conicum. Robert J. Pryce, Linda LintonPhytochemistry, November 1974, Volume 13, Issue 11, Pages 2497–2501, doi:10.1016/S0031-9422(00)86926-5
  3. ^ Atherton, Ian D.M.; Bosanquet, Sam D.S.; Llawley, Mark, eds. (2010). Mosses and Liverworts of Britain and Ireland: A Field Guide (PDF). British Bryological Society. p. 255. ISBN 978-0956131010. Retrieved 13 April 2015.

External links[edit]