Conrad Glass

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Conrad Glass in London, 2009

Conrad "Connie" Glass MBE (born 20 January 1961) is a Tristanian police officer and a former Chief Islander. He lives on Tristan da Cunha and is the first islander to have written a book about the territory — Rockhopper Copper (2005).

Biography[edit]

Glass was born on Tristan da Cunha on 20 January 1961. When Queen Mary's Peak erupted later that year, he and his family were evacuated to the United Kingdom. His family stayed in Calshot, Hampshire, for two years before returning to the South Atlantic island. Glass began his schooling in World War II-era navy huts on Tristan at the age of five, and in 1974 continued to study at the island's newly built school. He left school at the age of 15, but took further studies a year later so that he could pass UK exams.[1]

After completing his schooling, Glass worked at the island's fish factory for eight years. In 1985, having decided that future prospects in the fishing industry were dismal, Glass gained employment with the island's government in its supermarket warehouse. After a year working in the warehouse, Glass left Tristan with his family for Saint Helena, where he trained with the Saint Helena Police Service.[1]

One year later, Glass returned to his island home and started working as a storekeeper and tool clerk. Concurrent to that employment, Glass began to work part-time for the police service. Upon the retirement of Albert Glass, he assumed command of the police department on Tristan da Cunha. In 1992, Glass went to the UK for training with the Hertfordshire Constabulary. Upon his return to Tristan, he was promoted to the rank of Sergeant. He was promoted again in 1998, to Inspector.[1]

Glass became the first Tristanian to write a book on island life, its history and legends, when Rockhopper Copper was published in 2005.[2] In 2007, Glass stood in elections for the position of Chief Islander in the Tristan da Cunha Island Council;[3] which he won, serving 3 years until 2010.[4]

On 12 June 2010, Governor of Saint Helena Andrew Gurr announced that Glass was being awarded an MBE in honour of his years of dedicated service to the Tristanian community.[5] Glass was presented the MBE on 1 February 2011 by Governor Gurr.[6]

Glass continued as the island's only police officer. In 2010 he told The Guardian that in his then 22 years of service on the almost crime-free island, he had not had to use its sole holding cell since he took on the job. Glass also said that as his retirement approaches, no one has appeared to want to take over his position. Two special constables show no interest in doing so.[7]

Publications[edit]

  • Glass, Conrad: Rockhopper Copper, The Orphans Press, 2005, ISBN 9781903360101
  • Glass, Conrad: Rockhopper Copper, Polperro Heritage Press, 2012, 2nd edition, ISBN 9780953001231

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Profile of Conrad Glass Chief Islander 2007 – 2010". Tristan da Cunha Government. Archived from the original on 23 June 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2014.
  2. ^ Brock, Juanita (14 March 2005). "Rockhopper Copper set to Hit Bookshelves". Tristan Times. Archived from the original on 23 June 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2014.
  3. ^ Glass, Sarah (6 March 2007). "First Step Towards Island Council Elections". Tristan Times. Tristan da Cunha. Archived from the original on 23 June 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2014.
  4. ^ "Reports and Pictures from Conrad Glass' 2007 – 2010 tenure as Tristan da Cunha Chief Islander". Tristan da Cunha Government. Archived from the original on 23 June 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2014.
  5. ^ Brock, Juanita (18 June 2010). "Rockhopper Copper to Receive MBE". Tristan Times. Tristan da Cunha. Archived from the original on 23 June 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2014.
  6. ^ Glass, Sarah (7 February 2011). "Tristan's Governor makes his first visit to the Island". Tristan Times. Tristan da Cunha. Archived from the original on 23 June 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2014.
  7. ^ Crossan, Rob (13 January 2010). "The world's loneliest police beat". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 23 June 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2014.