Constitution Party (United States) federal candidates in 2010

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The Constitution Party
Chairman Frank Fluckiger
Founded U.S. Taxpayers' Party (1991 (1991))
Constitution Party (1999 (1999))
Headquarters 408 West Chestnut Street, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 17603. (Postal address is P.O. Box 1782, Lancaster, PA 17608-1782)
Membership  (2014) 76,425[1]
Ideology Paleoconservatism[2][3]
Christian right[4]
Fiscal conservatism[4]
Social conservatism[4]
Isolationism[5][6]
Political position Right-wing[7][8]
to Far-right[9][10][11][12][13]
Colors Red, white, and blue (national colors)
Seats in the Senate
0 / 100
Seats in the House
0 / 435
Governorships
0 / 50
State Upper House Seats
0 / 1,972
State Lower House Seats
0 / 5,411
Other elected offices 15 (2016)[14]
Website
www.constitutionparty.com

The following people were candidates of the United States Constitution Party for federal elections in 2010 by state:

Alabama[edit]

California[edit]

Florida[edit]

Kentucky[edit]

Minnesota[edit]

Mississippi[edit]

Missouri[edit]

Nevada[edit]

New Jersey[edit]

New York[edit]

Ohio[edit]

Utah[edit]

West Virginia[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Only Libertarians and Independents grew since 2008". Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  2. ^ Kleefeld, Eric (July 26, 2010). "Tancredo's New Home In The Constitution Party: A Religious, Paleoconservative Group Without Much Electoral Success". Talking Points Memo. Retrieved April 17, 2015. 
  3. ^ "Constitutionally Contentious". The American Spectator. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c "Ideological Third Parties and Splinter Parties". 
  5. ^ "The Princeton Encyclopedia of American Political History. (Two volume set)". Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  6. ^ "Presidential Campaigns, Slogans, Issues, and Platforms: The Complete ...". Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  7. ^ "Meet the Constitution Party's Candidate". Reason.com. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  8. ^ "Tancredo's New Home In The Constitution Party: A Religious, Paleoconservative Group Without Much Electoral Success". TPM. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  9. ^ Rudin, Ken. "Election 2010 Scorecard". National Public Radio. Retrieved 13 July 2013. 
  10. ^ Joyce, Kathryn (2010). Qu9iverfull: Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement. Beacon Press. pp. 7, 28. ISBN 978-0807010730. 
  11. ^ Cohen, Nancy L. (2012). Delirium: The Politics of Sex in America. Counterpoint. p. 321. ISBN 1582438013. 
  12. ^ Lovell, Jarret S. (2009). Crimes of Dissent: Civil Disobedience, Criminal Justice, and the Politics of Conscience. New York University Press. p. 50. ISBN 978-0814752272. 
  13. ^ Smith, Ben (2010-05-04). "Goode joins Constitution Party". Politico. 
  14. ^ Elected Office Holders Constitution Party website, Retrieved April 19, 2015
  15. ^ "GRUNDMANN FOR U.S. SENATE - Take the Red Pill". TruthUSA.org. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  16. ^ "Freedomcoalition.com". Freedomcoalition.com. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  17. ^ Bernie for America
  18. ^ "www.gailforcongress.com". www.gailforcongress.com. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  19. ^ "Home - William D. Wilday for Congress". Wildayforcongress.webs.com. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  20. ^ Gale Joy - Deaton For Senate. "Deaton For Senate 2010 Home Page". Deatonforsenate.com. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  21. ^ "ryonforcongress.com". ryonforcongress.com. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  22. ^ http://www.scottbradleyforsenate.com/sbradley/
  23. ^ http://site.kirk4congress.com
  24. ^ http://www.randallhinton.com/
  25. ^ http://jeffbecker.us
  26. ^ "Phil Hudok campaign website". Hudok.com. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 

Sources[edit]