Chinese Consulate-General, Los Angeles

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Coordinates: 34°03′57″N 118°17′24″W / 34.065727°N 118.290100°W / 34.065727; -118.290100

Chinese Consulate-General, Los Angeles
PRCConsulateLA.JPG
Simplified Chinese 中华人民共和国驻洛杉矶总领事馆
Traditional Chinese 中華人民共和國駐洛杉磯總領事館
Literal meaning Consulate-General of the People's Republic of China in Los Angeles

The Consulate-General of the People's Republic of China in Los Angeles is the People's Republic of China's (PRC) diplomatic mission headquartered at 443 Shatto Place in the Koreatown neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, United States.[1] The passport and visa office is on the third floor of 500 Shatto Place, Los Angeles, California. The consulate's service area is Southern California (as defined by the PRC; Northern California is served by The Consulate General of The People's Republic of China in San Francisco), Arizona, Hawaii, New Mexico, and the U.S. Pacific territories.[2][3]

In 1987, China and the United States reached an agreement that each would open a fifth consular mission in the other's country, which led to the opening of the Los Angeles mission and was intended to result in the opening of the U.S. Consulate General in Wuhan.[4]

Liu Jian is the Consul General the People's Republic of China in Los Angeles.[5] In 2013, he succeeded Zhang Yun, who led the consular mission from 2007 until 2013.[6]

On December 16, 2011, a man fired bullets from a 9 mm handgun into the Chinese consulate, intending to kill a security guard with whom he earlier had a dispute during a protest.[7] Although there were 20 people in the consulate at the time of the shooting, the assailant missed his target and no one was injured.[7] The man subsequently drove away in his car before turning himself in to police. He was identified as a 67-year-old activist from Shanghai, who was part of a group protest, at the consulate, against China's human rights record.[8] On December 19, 2011, he was charged with two felonies: "assault with a semiautomatic firearm" and "shooting at an inhabited dwelling".[9]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "General Information about the Consulate". Website of The Consulate General of The People's Republic of China in Los Angeles. 443 Shatto Place, Los Angeles, CA 90020, USA: The Consulate General of The People's Republic of China in Los Angeles. 19 June 2010. Retrieved 23 September 2013. 
  2. ^ "Service Area of the Chinese Consulate General in Los Angeles". Website of The Consulate General of The People's Republic of China in Los Angeles. 443 Shatto Place, Los Angeles, CA 90020, USA: The Consulate General of The People's Republic of China in Los Angeles. 15 June 2010. Retrieved 23 September 2013. 
  3. ^ "Embassy and Consulates General of the People's Republic of China". Website of the Embassy of the People's Republic of China in the United States of America. 3505 International Place, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20008, USA: Embassy of the People's Republic of China in the United States of America. 1 February 2007. Retrieved 23 September 2013. 
  4. ^ Morrison, Patt (26 February 1987). "U.S. to Allow Chinese Consulate in L.A". Los Angeles Times [Home Edition]. 202 West 1st Street, Los Angeles, California, 90012, USA. p. 30, Section 1; Metro Desk. Retrieved 23 September 2013. 
  5. ^ "Biography of the Consul-General". The Consulate General of The People's Republic of China in Los Angeles. 2013-07-26. Retrieved 23 September 2013. 
  6. ^ http://losangeles.china-consulate.org/eng/biography/t56604.htm
  7. ^ a b "Chinese man booked over LA consulate shooting". Los Angeles: Agence France-Presse. 2011-12-16. Retrieved 2011-12-16. 
  8. ^ "Shots fired at Chinese consulate in LA, 1 arrested". Los Angeles: Associated Press. 2011-12-16. 
  9. ^ "Las Vegas man charged in Chinese consulate shooting in LA". Associated Press. 2011-12-19. Retrieved 2012-02-04. 

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