Continental A40

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A40
Continental A40 l.jpg
Preserved Continental A40-5 (dual magneto, two spark plugs per cylinder)
Type Piston aero-engine
National origin United States
Manufacturer Teledyne Continental Motors
First run 1931
Major applications Taylor E-2 Cub
Piper J-2 Cub

The Continental A40 engine is a carbureted four-cylinder, horizontally opposed, air-cooled aircraft engine that was developed especially for use in light aircraft by Continental Motors. It was produced between 1931 and 1941.[1][2][3]

Design and development[edit]

The 37 hp (28 kW) A40 was introduced in the depths of the Great Depression. At the time there were a number of small engines available but all suffered from either high cost, complexity, or low reliability. The A-40 addressed all those shortcomings and was instrumental in the production of light aircraft in the difficult economic constraints of the period. The A-40-4 introduced an increase in power to 40 hp (30 kW). The engine later inspired the A-50 and subsequent engines.[1][2][4]

The A40 featured single ignition until the A-40-5 version, which introduced dual ignition. All engines in this family have a 5.2:1 compression ratio and were designed to run on fuel with a minimum octane rating of 73.[2][3]

The entire family of engines had its certification terminated on 1 November 1941. Engines produced before that date are still certified, but none can be produced after that date.[2][3]

Variants[edit]

A40
Single ignition, 37 hp (28 kW) at 2550 rpm, dry weight 144 lb (65 kg)[2]
A40-2
Single ignition, 37 hp (28 kW) at 2550 rpm, dry weight 144 lb (65 kg)[2]
A-40-3
Single ignition, 37 hp (28 kW) at 2550 rpm, dry weight 144 lb (65 kg)[2] Featured cadmium-nickel connecting rod bearings.[5]
A40-4
Single ignition, 40 hp (30 kW) at 2575 rpm, dry weight 144 lb (65 kg),[2] Steel backed connecting rod inserts
A40-5
Dual ignition, 40 hp (30 kW) at 2575 rpm, dry weight 156 lb (71 kg)[3]

Applications[edit]

Taylor E-2 Cub showing its A-40 engine with the cylinders protruding through the cowling, Canada Aviation Museum.

Engines on display[edit]

Specifications (A40-5)[edit]

Data from Type Certificate Data Sheet 72,[2] Jane's 1938[10]

General characteristics

  • Type: 4-cylinder air-cooled horizontally opposed aircraft piston engine
  • Bore: 3.125 in (79.3 mm)
  • Stroke: 3.75 in (95.3 mm)
  • Displacement: 115 cu in (1.9 L)
  • Length: 27.9375 in (710 mm)
  • Width: 26.4375 in (672 mm)
  • Height: 20.4375 in (519 mm)
  • Dry weight: 154 lb (69.9 kg) dry with carburrettor and magnetos

Components

  • Valvetrain: One intake and one exhaust side-valve per cylinder with a flathead valve design.
  • Fuel system: CMC Stromberg NA-82 carburetor
  • Fuel type: minimum 73 octane
  • Cooling system: Air-cooled

Performance

See also[edit]

Related lists

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Continental A-40". Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome. Retrieved 2011-09-26. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Federal Aviation Administration (November 1941). "Approved Type Certificate 72" (PDF). Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  3. ^ a b c d Federal Aviation Administration (November 1941). "Approved Type Certificate 174" (PDF). Retrieved 2008-12-15. 
  4. ^ Christy, Joe: Engines for Homebuilt Aircraft & Ultralights, pages 8-9. TAB Books, 1983. ISBN 0-8306-2347-7
  5. ^ Sport Aviation. December 1959.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ a b c d Wooden props (2008). "Fahlin Propellers". Retrieved 2008-12-13. 
  7. ^ "ATC 660 data sheet" (PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Retrieved 2011-09-27. 
  8. ^ "Aircraft Specification No. A-691" (PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Retrieved 2011-09-27. 
  9. ^ "TC 637 data sheet" (PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Retrieved 2011-09-26. 
  10. ^ Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1938. London: Sampson, Low & Martin company Limited. 1938. 

External links[edit]