Conus cedonulli

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Conus cedonulli
Conus cedonulli 1.jpg
Apertural and abapertural views of shell of Conus cedonulli Linnaeus, C., 1767
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Mollusca
Class: Gastropoda
Clade: Caenogastropoda
Clade: Hypsogastropoda
Clade: Neogastropoda
Superfamily: Conoidea
Family: Conidae
Genus: Conus
Species: C. cedonulli
Binomial name
Conus cedonulli
Linnaeus, 1758
Synonyms[2]
  • Conus (Stephanoconus) cedonulli Linnaeus, 1767 accepted, alternate representation
  • Conus amiralis Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus amiralis var. cedonulli Linnaeus, 1767 (original rank)
  • Conus caledonicus Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus caracanus Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus cedonulli insularis Gmelin, 1791
  • Conus cedonulli var. amiralis Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus cedonulli var. caracanus Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus cedonulli var. grenadensis Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus cedonulli var. martinicanus Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus grenadensis Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus holemani Nowell-Usticke, 1968
  • Conus martinicanus Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus nullisecundus Nowell-Usticke, 1968
  • Cucullus geographicus Röding, 1798
  • Protoconus cedonulli (Linnaeus, 1767)
  • Tenorioconus caracanus (Hwass in Bruguière, 1792)
  • Tenorioconus cedonulli (Linnaeus, 1767)
  • Tenorioconus insularis (Gmelin, 1791)

Conus cedonulli is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[2]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Being a very varied species-complex, there has been much confusion in the course of years about which species and subspecies to assign to the Conus cedonulli-complex, hence the number of synonyms named.
In 1985 D.L.N. Vink proposed assigning the following species to the Conus cedonulli-complex along with Conus cedonulli :[3]

  • Conus aurantius Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus insularis Gmelin, 1791 : considered by Vink to be a synonym of Conus aurantius Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus mappa sensu Lightfoot, 1786
  • Conus sanctaemarthae spec. nov. : now synonym of Conus mappa sensu Lightfoot, 1786

The following subspecies of Conus cedonulli were recognized by the World Register of Marine Species:

  • Conus cedonulli dominicanus Hwass in Bruguière, 1792:[4] synonym of Conus dominicanus Hwass in Bruguière, 1792
  • Conus cedonulli insularis Gmelin, 1791:[5] synonym of Conus cedonulli Linnaeus, 1767

Description[edit]

The color of the species in this complex is white to purplish grey
although specimens from St. Vincent are very often dark-mahogany-brown, with some rare examples being 'black' or near-black.[6]
The shell is crossed by streaks that are alternately light and dark. Between these streaks yellow, brown or dark dots occur.
The operculum is small compared to the aperture and is only one seventh its size.
The soft body of the animal is dark red.[6]
The size of an adult shell varies between 38 mm and 78 mm.

Distribution[edit]

This species occurs in the Caribbean Sea from Colombia to Trinidad, along the Lesser Antilles and along the Bahamas.
Off West coast BARBADOS, the species has been dredged at depths around 85 fathoms/510 feet.
This would appear to be the species' bathymetric maximum, since at other locations the species is usually found at much shallower depths.[7]

Gallery[edit]

Below are several color forms:

References[edit]

  1. ^ NatureServe (2013). "Conus cedonulli". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 15 December 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Conus cedonulli Linnaeus, 1758.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 27 March 2010.
  3. ^ D.L.N. Vink, The Conus cedonulli complex; Zoologische Mededelingen, 51 (5), 1979 p.79-93
  4. ^ Conus cedonulli dominicus Hwass in Bruguière, 1792.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 11 September 2011.
  5. ^ Conus cedonulli insularis Gmelin, 1791.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 11 September 2011.
  6. ^ a b Personal marine bio experience
  7. ^ Personal marine bio experience via trappings and dredgings, during the 1980's

External links[edit]