Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material

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The Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material was adopted on 26 October 1979 in Vienna, Austria. The initial signing ceremony took place in Vienna and at New York on 3 March 1980, and the convention entered into force on 8 February 1987. The convention is deposited with the International Atomic Energy Agency. In July 2005 a diplomatic conference was convened to amend the Convention and strengthen its provisions,[1] as a result of which it was renamed the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities.

As of 2014, there are 149 state parties to the convention plus the European Atomic Energy Community. Bulgaria, Hungary, Mongolia, Poland, and Russia have denounced the convention after having ratified it.

The United States Department of State says that:

The Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material provides for certain levels of physical protection during international transport of nuclear material. It also establishes a general framework for cooperation among states in the protection, recovery, and return of stolen nuclear material. Further, the Convention lists certain serious offenses involving nuclear material which state parties are to make punishable and for which offenders shall be subject to a system of extradition or submission for prosecution.

—United States Department of State[2]

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