Conway Bypass (New Hampshire)

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NH Route 16.svg

The Conway Bypass is a proposed rerouting of New Hampshire Route 16 around the villages of Conway and North Conway. Though it has been in a proposal stage for decades, the project is still slowly moving forward. To date, multiple related early stage projects have been completed, including most recently upgrading North-South Road near North Conway.

The proposed route is split into three stages - southern, middle, and northern.

Southern leg[edit]

The southern section is planned to run from the two-lane section of present-day Route 16 near the Conway - Albany border to the US 302 - NH 113 intersection, effectively detouring to the south of Conway village. To date, no major work has been done on this section.

On June 25, 2008, New Hampshire Governor John Lynch signed the Ten-Year Highway Transportation Plan into law, which included the southern leg of the Conway Bypass. Construction is planned to start in 2015 and last four years, splitting the southern leg of the bypass into three phases during that time.[1]

Middle leg[edit]

The middle section of the highway is planned to run from the US 302 - NH 113 intersection to near the present day Wal-Mart location, crossing the site of the former White Mountain Airport. Portions of this leg have seen preliminary work, such as clearing. This section is not currently part of the state's Ten-Year Highway Transportation Plan.

On April 13, 2010, with doubt of the middle and northern sections being built, Conway voters removed the late-1990s-created overlay district for this route, allowing for development within 500 feet of the state owned bypass corridor. [2]

Northern leg[edit]

The northern section of the highway is planned to run adjacent to North-South Road near North Conway. Preliminary work has been done to facilitate this, including a leg leading from a new rotary. This section is not currently part of the state's Ten-Year Highway Transportation Plan.

On April 13, 2010, with doubt of the middle and northern sections being built, Conway voters removed the late-1990s-created overlay district for this route, allowing for development within 500 feet of the state owned bypass corridor. [3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Conway Daily Sun, June 27, 2008
  2. ^ Conway Daily Sun, April 14, 2010
  3. ^ Conway Daily Sun, April 14, 2010

External links[edit]