Cook County, Minnesota

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Cook County
Cook County Courthouse
Map of Minnesota highlighting Cook County
Location within the U.S. state of Minnesota
Map of the United States highlighting Minnesota
Minnesota's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 47°55′00″N 90°33′00″W / 47.916666666667°N 90.55°W / 47.916666666667; -90.55
Country United States
State Minnesota
FoundedMarch 9, 1874
Named forMichael Cook
SeatGrand Marais
Largest cityGrand Marais
Area
 • Total3,340 sq mi (8,700 km2)
 • Land1,452 sq mi (3,760 km2)
 • Water1,887 sq mi (4,890 km2)  57%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total5,600
 • Estimate 
(2021)
5,617 Increase
 • Density1.7/sq mi (0.65/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district8th
Websitewww.co.cook.mn.us

Cook County is the easternmost county in the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of the 2020 census, the population was 5,600,[1] making it Minnesota's seventh-least populous county. Its county seat is Grand Marais.[2] The Grand Portage Indian Reservation is in the county.

History[edit]

Ojibwe people were early inhabitants of this area. The first non-indigenous people to explore the area were French fur traders, a few of whom settled in the area. By the 1830s, the French population was a few dozen. In the 1830s, settlers began arriving from New England and from upstate New York. Completion of the Erie Canal (1825) and settling of the Black Hawk War (1831) made migration easier.

Most of Cook County's 1830s settlers came from Orange County, Vermont and Down East Maine (modern day Washington County and Hancock County). Most were fishermen and farmers. By 1845 the future Cook County contained 350 people of European descent; by 1874 there were about 2,000. They were primarily members of the Congregational Church, Methodist, and Baptist churches. By 1900 there were about 3,000 people in Cook County.

The first decade of the 20th century saw a large influx of Europeans from Germany, Scandinavia, and Ireland. These waves introduced Lutheranism and Catholicism to Cook County.

The county was created on March 9, 1874.[3] It was named for Territorial and State Senator Michael Cook.[4]

Geography[edit]

Eagle Mountain, the highest natural point in Minnesota at 2,301 feet (701 m), is located in northern Cook County.

Cook County is a rugged, heavily wooded triangle of land on Minnesota's northeastern tip. It abuts Canada's southern border and is largely surrounded by the northern end of the Great Lakes. It is heavily dotted with lakes, ponds and streams.[5] The state's highest point is in the county, at 2,301' (701m) ASL. The county has an area of 3,340 square miles (8,700 km2), of which 1,452 square miles (3,760 km2) is land and 1,887 square miles (4,890 km2) (57%) is water.[6] It is Minnesota's second-largest county by area. Minnesota's highest natural point, Eagle Mountain at 2,301 feet (701 m), and highest lake, Lake Abita at 2,048 feet (624 m), are in Cook County. Lake Superior is at the county's southern border.

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Cook County is in the extreme northeast of the state at the tip of the Arrowhead region; it is adjacent to only one other county by land. Its geographic neighbors are:

Protected areas[edit]

[5]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Lutsen, Minnesota
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 22
(−6)
26
(−3)
35
(2)
47
(8)
56
(13)
64
(18)
70
(21)
70
(21)
62
(17)
52
(11)
39
(4)
27
(−3)
48
(9)
Average low °F (°C) 4
(−16)
7
(−14)
19
(−7)
31
(−1)
39
(4)
45
(7)
52
(11)
54
(12)
47
(8)
38
(3)
26
(−3)
11
(−12)
31
(−1)
Average rainfall inches (mm) 0.9
(23)
0.7
(18)
1.4
(36)
1.9
(48)
2.8
(71)
3.5
(89)
3.3
(84)
3.3
(84)
3.6
(91)
2.5
(64)
1.6
(41)
1.1
(28)
26.4
(670)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 15.2
(39)
8.1
(21)
8.1
(21)
2.2
(5.6)
0.2
(0.51)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.4
(1.0)
3.8
(9.7)
13.3
(34)
50.8
(129)
Source: Weatherbase[7]

Northern Minnesota offers extreme winter weather. While the averages are low, the extremes provide more details. A third of the year is below freezing (31.9%, 116 days, or 4 months). Of those days, 21 are below zero degrees Fahrenheit (−17.8 °C).

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Days Below 32 °F/0 °C[7]
20 18 19 13 3.5 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.5 5.8 16 20 116
Days Below 0 °F/-17.8 °C[7]
8.2 6 1.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0.5 4.8 21

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
188065
18909850.8%
1900810726.5%
19101,33664.9%
19201,84137.8%
19302,43532.3%
19403,03024.4%
19502,900−4.3%
19603,37716.4%
19703,4231.4%
19804,09219.5%
19903,868−5.5%
20005,16833.6%
20105,1760.2%
20205,6008.2%
2021 (est.)5,617[8]0.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790-1960[10] 1900-1990[11]
1990-2000[12] 2010-2020[1]
Age pyramid of county residents based on 2000 census data

2000 census[edit]

As of the 2000 census,[13] there were 5,168 people, 2,350 households, and 1,438 families in the county. The population density was 3.56/sqmi (1.37/km2). There were 4,708 housing units at an average density of 3.24/sqmi (1.25/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 89.45% White, 7.59% Native American, 0.33% Asian, 0.29% Black or African American, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.25% from other races, and 2.05% from two or more races. 0.75% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 21.6% were of German, 17.7% Norwegian, 11.5% Swedish, 7.2% Irish and 5.4% English ancestry.

There were 2,350 households, of which 24.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.8% were non-families. 32.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.17 and the average family size was 2.73.

The county population contained 20.4% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 31.2% from 45 to 64, and 17.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44. For every 100 females there were 99.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.5 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,640, and the median income for a family was $47,132. Males had a median income of $31,211 versus $23,650 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,775. About 8.1% of families and 10.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.2% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

[5]

Townships[edit]

Unorganized territories[edit]

Ghost towns[edit]

Government and politics[edit]

Cook County has generally voted Democratic. In 88% of presidential elections since 1988, the county selected the Democratic nominee. The county was a bellwether in every election from 1916 to 1984, except 1960 and 1976. The county was one of the rare white-majority rural counties to have its margin increase for Joe Biden in 2020 relative to Barack Obama's 2012 margin, with 65% of voters choosing the Democratic nominee.

Elections and officeholders[edit]

United States presidential election results for Cook County, Minnesota[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 1,203 31.59% 2,496 65.55% 109 2.86%
2016 1,156 34.05% 1,912 56.32% 327 9.63%
2012 1,221 36.75% 1,993 59.99% 108 3.25%
2008 1,240 37.04% 2,019 60.30% 89 2.66%
2004 1,489 45.08% 1,733 52.47% 81 2.45%
2000 1,295 45.92% 1,171 41.52% 354 12.55%
1996 1,010 39.94% 1,169 46.22% 350 13.84%
1992 878 33.54% 1,005 38.39% 735 28.07%
1988 1,078 49.36% 1,080 49.45% 26 1.19%
1984 1,219 51.63% 1,129 47.82% 13 0.55%
1980 1,147 50.62% 871 38.44% 248 10.94%
1976 1,034 48.54% 1,018 47.79% 78 3.66%
1972 1,047 57.62% 742 40.84% 28 1.54%
1968 853 49.33% 777 44.94% 99 5.73%
1964 764 43.86% 976 56.03% 2 0.11%
1960 987 60.15% 650 39.61% 4 0.24%
1956 1,078 61.67% 668 38.22% 2 0.11%
1952 946 65.06% 503 34.59% 5 0.34%
1948 674 47.94% 688 48.93% 44 3.13%
1944 513 48.12% 545 51.13% 8 0.75%
1940 673 49.27% 686 50.22% 7 0.51%
1936 387 32.14% 793 65.86% 24 1.99%
1932 418 43.27% 492 50.93% 56 5.80%
1928 609 72.59% 219 26.10% 11 1.31%
1924 471 67.97% 29 4.18% 193 27.85%
1920 467 72.85% 98 15.29% 76 11.86%
1916 125 34.44% 162 44.63% 76 20.94%
1912 30 8.62% 65 18.68% 253 72.70%
1908 255 77.98% 42 12.84% 30 9.17%
1904 207 82.80% 31 12.40% 12 4.80%
1900 81 52.60% 65 42.21% 8 5.19%
1896 81 42.19% 107 55.73% 4 2.08%
1892 68 51.52% 19 14.39% 45 34.09%
1888 24 45.28% 29 54.72% 0 0.00%
1884 46 85.19% 8 14.81% 0 0.00%


County Board of Commissioners[15]
Position Name District
Commissioner Robert Svaleson District 1
Commissioner Stacey Hawkins District 2
Commissioner and Chairperson David Mills District 3
Commissioner and Vice Chair Ann Sullivan District 4
Commissioner Ginny Storlie District 5
State Legislature (2018-2020)
Position Name Affiliation District
  Senate Tom Bakk[16] Independent District 3
  House of Representatives Rob Ecklund[17] Democrat District 3A
U.S Congress (2018-2020)
Position Name Affiliation District
  House of Representatives Pete Stauber[18] Republican 8th
  Senate Amy Klobuchar[19] Democrat N/A
  Senate Tina Smith[20] Democrat N/A

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Cook County, Minnesota". www.census.gov. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 4, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Minnesota Place Names". Minnesota Historical Society. Archived from the original on June 20, 2012. Retrieved March 17, 2014.
  4. ^ Upham, Warren (1920). Minnesota Geographic Names: Their Origin and Historic Significance. Minnesota Historical Society. p. 135.
  5. ^ a b c Cook County MN Google Maps (accessed March 6, 2019)
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved October 6, 2014.
  7. ^ a b c "Weatherbase: Historical Weather for Lutsen MN". Retrieved January 9, 2009.
  8. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021". Retrieved April 4, 2022.
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 6, 2014.
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved October 6, 2014.
  11. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 6, 2014.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 6, 2014.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 17, 2018.
  15. ^ "County Commissioners". www.co.cook.mn.us. Archived from the original on December 28, 2021. Retrieved December 28, 2021.
  16. ^ "MN State Senate". www.senate.mn. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  17. ^ "Rep. Rob Ecklund (03A) - Minnesota House of Representatives". www.house.leg.state.mn.us. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  18. ^ "Representative Pete Stauber". Representative Pete Stauber. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  19. ^ "U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar". www.klobuchar.senate.gov. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  20. ^ "Home". Senator Tina Smith. Retrieved June 24, 2020.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 47°55′N 90°33′W / 47.917°N 90.550°W / 47.917; -90.550