Cook County Sheriff's Office

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Cook County Sheriff's Office
IL - Cook County Sheriff.jpg
Abbreviation CCSO
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdiction Cook County, Illinois, Illinois, United States
Legal jurisdiction Cook County, Illinois
General nature • Local civilian agency
Headquarters Chicago & Maywood, Illinois

Sworn members 6,900 at full strength
Sheriff responsible
Departments
Website
www.cookcountysheriff.org

The Cook County Sheriff's Office is the principal law enforcement agency that serves Cook County, Illinois. It is the second largest sheriff's department in the United States, with over 6,900 members when at full operational strength. It is headed by the Sheriff of Cook County, currently Thomas Dart. Due to its size the Cook County Sheriff's Office divides its operations by task into several departments, the most recognizable of them are the Cook County Sheriff's Police Department, the Court Services Department, and the Department of Corrections. The Sheriff oversees all three departments.

All Cook County Sheriff's Deputies are Sworn and State certified Peace Officers with Full Statutory Power of Arrest regardless of their particular job function or title. Like other sheriffs' departments in Illinois, the Sheriff can provide all traditional law-enforcement functions, including county-wide patrol and investigations irrespective of municipal boundaries, even in the city of Chicago, but has traditionally limited its police patrol functions to unincorporated areas of the county because unincorporated areas are the primary jurisdiction of a Sheriff's Department in Illinois.

The Sheriff's Police patrol services are often not required in incorporated cities because the cities such as Chicago have established their own police departments. The 500–600 member Sheriff's Police Department would not have the personnel necessary to supply full police services to all incorporated areas in Cook County especially in a municipality such as Chicago.

Like other sheriffs' departments in Illinois, the sheriff can provide all traditional law-enforcement functions, including county-wide patrol and investigations irrespective of municipal boundaries, even in the city of Chicago, but has traditionally limited its police patrol functions to unincorporated areas of the county which are the primary jurisdiction of a sheriff's department in Illinois.

Sheriff's Deputies provide the other services of the sheriff, such as service of process, enforcing evictions and levies, securing courthouses, securing and operating the 9,000-plus detainee population of the Cook County Jail, transporting prisoners and overseeing offender rehabilitation programs.

Cook County has additional police departments that are not the responsibility of the sheriff. These include the Cook County Forest Preserve District Police and Cook County Hospital Police.

A Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor of the Cook County Sheriff's Office

Sheriff's Office Internal Departments[edit]

The Cook County Sheriff's Office is carved into several departments. [1]

  • The Cook County Sheriff's Police Department is the third largest police department in the State of Illinois. They are state certified law enforcement officers and are in charged with patrolling unincorporated areas of Cook County as well as assisting suburban police departments with police operations including, but not limited to, detective and evidence services, narcotics interdiction, bomb detection and disposal, vice operations, street crimes suppression and hostage/barricade/terrorist incidents. Approximately 109,000 people live in unincorporated communities within Cook County among the county's 5.3 million total population. The Cook County Sheriff's Police Training Academy trains police recruits within the department as well as those from suburban agencies.
  • Cook County Sheriff's Department of Corrections is one of the largest single-site pre-trial holding facilities in the world. Deputy Sheriff's assigned to Department of Corrections are responsible for the security of more than 9,000 detainees, many of whom are violent offenders awaiting trial in the criminal court system.
  • Sheriff’s Police Fugitive Warrant Unit is responsible for the apprehension of fugitives wanted on warrants for criminal offenses. This unit works closely with the United States Marshal's Great Lakes Task Force and is also responsible for extradition of offenders from outside the Cook County area.
  • Sheriff’s Office BII / Criminal Intelligence Unit is a vital information hub gathering gang intelligence from within the Department of Corrections and bridges the information gap between all divisions of the sheriff's office and outside agencies. This unit is also responsible for investigative services within corrections and court facilities and is featured in the MSNBC television series "The Squeeze".[2]
  • Department of Women's Justice Services administers gender responsive drug treatment programs for female offenders and programs for pregnant detainees among many other services.
  • Jail Diversion and Crime Prevention Division was designed to make the Cook County Sheriff’s Office more useful and accessible to residents. It operates manoy vital preventive and educational programs that municipalities, schools and average citizens can take advantage of free of charge. Programs include DUI and distracted driving prevention, graffiti removal, New Path speakers' series, and the SMART program.
  • The Office Of Professional Review investigates allegations of misconduct within the sheriff's office.
  • The Court Services Division provides security for all courtrooms, judges and other government officials as well as prisoners being tried. In addition to providing courtroom security, deputy sheriffs operate security posts at the entrance of each facility where many arrests are made every year of individuals attempting to enter with weapons, drugs and other various contraband. Cook County is home to one of the largest unified court systems in the world, including the Richard J. Daley Center which is arguably the largest courthouse in the world.

Rank structure and insignia are different under each division of the Sheriff[edit]

Rank insignia[citation needed] for exempt positions that are above the below listed merit ranks include gold oak leaves, eagles then increasing numbers of gold stars worn on shirt collars and on shoulders of jackets. Merit Rank insignia for a Correctional, Deputy, or Police Lieutenant is a gold bar worn on the collars of the shirt and the shoulders of the jacket. Rank insignia for a Correctional and Deputy Sergeant are gold chevrons worn on the collars of the shirt and embroidered chevrons worn on the upper sleeves of shirts and jackets. Police Sergeants, however, wear brown chevrons on the sleeves of their uniform shirts. Tenured officers will have gold hash-marks or stars on the lower left side of their long-sleeved shirts and jackets. Each mark represents five years of service. A star represents twenty years of service.

Title Insignia
Chief of Police/Executive Director (Courts or Corrections)
First Deputy Chief of Police/First Assistant Executive Director (Correctional)
Deputy Chief of Police/Assistant Executive Director (Courts or Corrections)
Police Lieutenant/Correctional Lieutenant/Deputy Lieutenant
US-O2 insignia.svg
Police Sergeant/Correctional Sergeant/Deputy Sergeant
LAPD Sergeant-1.jpg
Police Officer/Correctional Deputy/Deputy Sheriff

Fallen officers[edit]

Since the establishment of the Cook County Sheriff’s Office, 15 officers have died in the line of duty.[3][4][5]

Officer Date of Death Details
Deputy Sheriff Frank E. Nye[6]
Thursday, December 22, 1898
Gunfire
Policeman Sam F. Kaiser[7]
Sunday, April 20, 1930
Motorcycle accident
Policeman Frederick C. Bryant[8]
Saturday, May 24, 1930
Motorcycle accident
Policeman Meyer Joseph (Jack) Lapine[9]
Monday, September 5, 1932
Motorcycle accident
Policeman Robert (Ruby) Schanbaum[10]
Saturday, August 11, 1934
Vehicular assault
Policeman Frank J. Christian[11]
Sunday, October 19, 1941
Vehicular assault
Deputy Sheriff Joseph Law Sr.[12]
Saturday, September 21, 1974
Gunfire
Police Investigator John A. Rusnak[13]
Wednesday, August 3, 1977
Automobile accident
Police Investigator Michael W. Ridges[14]
Thursday, October 17, 1985
Gunfire
Deputy Sheriff Jeffery Blakey[15]
Tuesday, January 5, 1988
Assault
Deputy Sheriff Alfred Brown Jr.[16]
Tuesday, November 17, 1992
Assault
Police Officer James F. Knapp[17]
Wednesday, January 4, 2006
Automobile accident
Deputy Sheriff Nikkii Bostic-Jones[18]
Wednesday, July 18, 2012
Vehicular Assault
Deputy Sheriff/ Investigator II Cuauhtemoc Estrada[19]
Friday, 20 December 2013
Gunfire
Police Officer Jason Gallero[20] Thursday, September 15, 2016 Fatal Medical Event

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cook County Sheriff's Office Departments page". CookCountySheriff.org. 2009-01-22. Archived from the original on 2009-01-22. Retrieved 2012-08-13. 
  2. ^ "NBC% Chicago". Nbcchicago.com. 2012-07-09. Retrieved 2012-08-13. 
  3. ^ "The Officer Down Memorial Page". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-08-13. 
  4. ^ "The Officer Down Memorial Page". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-08-13. 
  5. ^ "The Officer Down Memorial Page". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-08-13. 
  6. ^ "Deputy Sheriff Frank E. Nye, Cook County Sheriff's Office – Department of Court Services, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  7. ^ "Policeman Sam F. Kaiser, Cook County Highway Police, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  8. ^ "Policeman Frederick C. Bryant, Cook County Highway Police, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  9. ^ "Policeman Meyer Joseph "Jack" Lapine, Cook County Highway Police, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  10. ^ "Policeman Robert "Ruby" Schanbaum, Cook County Highway Police, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  11. ^ "Policeman Frank J. Christian, Cook County Highway Police, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  12. ^ "Deputy Sheriff Joseph Law, Sr., Cook County Sheriff's Office – Department of Court Services, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  13. ^ "Investigator John A. Rusnak, Cook County Sheriff's Police Department, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  14. ^ "Investigator Michael W. Ridges, Cook County Sheriff's Police Department, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  15. ^ "Correctional Officer Jeffery B. Blakey, Cook County Sheriff's Office – Department of Corrections, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  16. ^ "Deputy Sheriff Alfred "Butch" Brown, Jr., Cook County Sheriff's Office – Department of Court Services, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  17. ^ "Patrol Officer James F. Knapp, Cook County Sheriff's Police Department, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  18. ^ "Correctional Officer Nikkii Bostic-Jones, Cook County Sheriff's Office – Department of Corrections, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2012-10-31. 
  19. ^ "Investigator II Cuauhtemoc Estrada, Cook County Sheriff's Office – Department of Court Services, Illinois". Odmp.org. Retrieved 2014-06-18. 
  20. ^ "Patrol Officer Jason Gallero". The Officer Down Memorial Page (ODMP). Retrieved 2016-11-06. 

External links[edit]