Cooksbridge railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Cooksbridge National Rail
Cooksbridge Railway Station.jpg
Location
PlaceCooksbridge
Local authorityLewes
Coordinates50°54′14″N 0°00′32″W / 50.904°N 0.009°W / 50.904; -0.009Coordinates: 50°54′14″N 0°00′32″W / 50.904°N 0.009°W / 50.904; -0.009
Grid referenceTQ400134
Operations
Station codeCBR
Managed bySouthern
Number of platforms2
DfT categoryF2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2013/14Increase 44,310
2014/15Increase 46,530
2015/16Decrease 45,374
2016/17Decrease 37,058
2017/18Increase 39,044
History
Original companyLondon, Brighton and South Coast Railway
Pre-groupingLondon, Brighton and South Coast Railway
Post-groupingSouthern Railway
1 October 1847Opened as Cook's Bridge
May 1885Renamed Cooksbridge
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Cooksbridge from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

Cooksbridge railway station serves the village of Cooksbridge in East Sussex. It is on the East Coastway Line, 47 miles 31 chains (76.3 km) from London Bridge via Redhill. Train services are provided by Southern.

The station is unstaffed. A PERTIS ticket machine was installed in 2008 on both the London-bound and the Lewes-bound platform.

History[edit]

Cooksbridge lies on the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway "cut-off" line between Keymer Junction, near Wivelsfield on the Brighton Main Line, and Lewes. The erstwhile Brighton, Lewes and Hastings Railway were authorised to build the line in 1845; the LBSCR purchased it and opened the link on 1 October 1847.[1] The station opened as Cook's Bridge[2] on the same date.[3] The first station master was Richard Strevett who stayed until promoted to Hailsham on 17 August 1861. This replacement (George Bennett) lasted only a few weeks, arriving on 16 August 1861 and returning to his old job (porter at Brighton) on 6 September 1861. His replacement, Alfred Paver, was appointed on 13 September 1861.[4]

The initial services were very sparse. The May 1848 timetable shows Up Trains to London at 8.30am and 5.50pm and a London arrivals at 9am. (Afternoon passengers were directed to travel via Lewes on the 5.50pm train).[5]

Services[edit]

The station has a limited service: there are 11 southbound towards Eastbourne and 12 northbound trains towards London Victoria per weekday. There is no weekend service.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Plumpton   Southern
East Coastway Line
Mondays-Fridays only
  Lewes

References[edit]

  1. ^ Official notice published in The Sussex Advertiser. 28 September 1847. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. ^ Butt, R.V.J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations. Yeovil: Patrick Stephens Ltd. p. 68. ISBN 1-85260-508-1. R508.
  3. ^ Dendy Marshall, C.F.; Kidner, R.W. (1963) [1937]. History of the Southern Railway (2nd ed.). Shepperton: Ian Allan. p. 515. ISBN 0-7110-0059-X.
  4. ^ The employment records of the London Brighton & South Coast Railway held in the National Archives.
  5. ^ The Sussex Advertiser. 30 May 1848. Missing or empty |title= (help)

External links[edit]