Coordinated care organization

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

A coordinated care organization (CCO) is a community based, integrated care organization created by the state of Oregon to allow for local and regional distribution and coordination of healthcare to segments of the state's population covered under the Oregon Health Plan.

Its members are part of the Medicaid segment of the population and the CCO works with health care providers, hospitals, and local community groups to integrate healthcare services and contain cost increases through improved quality of care.[1][2] CCOs were created through Oregon Senate Bill 1580.[3]

CCOs have some very basic similarities with accountable care organizations (ACOs) but its major difference with ACOs are as follows. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) makes no provision for CCOs, there is no structured framework for them, are state developed, they might function as either a single organization or a network of providers, consumers do play a role in the governance of the organization, have a global budget with shared savings if certain quality measures are met,[4] emphasis on preventative health but also on non-medical determinants of health (eg housing, food security, and transportation),[5][6][7] and behavioral health integration is an explicit goal.[8][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Oregon Health & Science News. Oregon's CCO approach is a model for reduced health care spending, study finds". 7 March 2017.
  2. ^ "Oregon Health Authority. Coordinated Care: the Oregon Difference".
  3. ^ "Oregon Senate Bill 1580". 12 March 2012.
  4. ^ "Oregon's Health System Transformation: CCO Metrics 2015 Final Report" (PDF). June 2016.
  5. ^ "Beyond Health Care: The Role of Social Determinants in Promoting Health and Health Equity". 10 May 2018.
  6. ^ "WHO Social determinants of health".
  7. ^ "CDC: Social Determinants of Health: Know What Affects Health".
  8. ^ "What makes a CCO different from an ACO?".
  9. ^ "ACOs, CCOs: Challenges and Opportunities" (PDF).

External links[edit]