Copacetic (Knuckle Puck album)

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Copacetic
Copacetic KP.jpg
Studio album by Knuckle Puck
Released July 31, 2015
Recorded February 26–April 1, 2015
Always Be Genius Recording Studio
Genre Pop punk,[1][2][3] emo[1]
Length 40:47
Label Rise
Producer Seth Henderson
Knuckle Puck chronology
While I Stay Secluded
(2014)
Copacetic
(2015)
Shapeshifter
(2017)
Singles from Copacetic
  1. "Disdain"
    Released: July 6, 2015
  2. "True Contrite"
    Released: July 6, 2015

Copacetic is the debut studio album by American pop punk band Knuckle Puck. Following the release of several EPs and the addition of bassist Ryan Rumchaks, the band began writing material for their debut album. In late December, it was announced the band had signed to Rise Records. The band recorded at Always Be Genius Recording Studio between February and April 2015 with producer Seth Henderson.

Copacetic was released through Rise on July 31. The album sold over 8,000 copies in the first week, charting at number 61 on the Billboard 200. It also charted in the top 20 on several Billboard charts and in the top 50 on several UK charts.

Background[edit]

Knuckle Puck formed as a cover band in the fall of 2010[4] in the outskirts of Chicago.[5] The band consisted of vocalist Joe Taylor, guitarist Kevin Maida and drummer John Siorek.[4] Before the group started writing original songs in April 2011 with the addition of guitarist Nick Casasanto.[4] Since a permanent bass player had not been found, the group had friends fill in on bass.[4] The band released five EPs over the course of three years.[5] Maida explained that the lyrical content in the EPs were about the band's "woes in life and what was bringing us down".[6] In spring 2014 the band recruited bassist Ryan Rumchaks.[4] In October, the band released the last of these EPs, titled While I Stay Secluded. Maida commented that the band had "firmly and confidently" considered the EP their best work so far.[7] In November and December, the band supported Modern Baseball on their fall tour.[8] On December 22, Knuckle Puck announced they had signed to Rise Records[9] and planned to release their debut full-length album in summer 2015.[10] Maida said that Rise would be "a bountiful new home" for them and would help them evolve.[9]

Production[edit]

In late 2014 the band started writing material for Copacetic.[4] Maida claimed the band wanted their sound to "cross as many different paths as possible" without it bearing a predictable sound.[11] The group tried "as many new and exciting things as possible" to expand their sound.[11] Maida called the album "a definitive statement" for the band, "it's a new chapter and a new beginning."[11] Maida explained that the material on Copacetic is about "a state of being content" as opposed to life struggles in previous EPs.[6] Maida also said that some songs on the album refer to things that "bother us, but overall it's about saying, 'I'm fine. I'm alright'".[6] "Disdain" is about difficulties with a long-distance relationship and "disdain one can develop for said distance."[12] "Untitled" came about from the band attempting to mix the styles of 1990s emo bands, such as American Football and Mineral.[4]

On February 26, the band announced they had started recording Copacetic,[13] and it was completed on April 1.[14] The album was produced by Seth Henderson at Always Be Genius Recording Studio.[15] Henderson also mixed the album, while Kris Crummett mastered it.[15]

Release[edit]

On June 11, 2015, Copacetic was announced along with its track list and artwork.[16] The artwork was done by Ben Sears, who also provided design.[15] On June 19, a music video was released for "Disdain".[17] The video was directed by Max Moore.[18] On June 30, "True Contrite" was made available for streaming.[19] The band played on the 2015 edition of Warped Tour.[20] On July 6, "Disdain" and "True Contrite" were released as singles.[21][22] On July 14, "Pretense" was made available for streaming.[23] On July 23, the album was made available for streaming.[24] Copacetic was released on July 31 through Rise.[16][nb 1] On August 10, a music video for "True Contrite" was released.[25] The video features Casasanto's brother[25] and was directed by Moore.[26] The video was filmed twice: one with polaroids on the wall, and the other with nothing on the walls.[25] Maida said the video was "one of the most painstaking, rewarding experiences ever".[25] The band supported State Champs on their European tour in September and October.[27] Knuckle Puck toured the U.S. in October and November, with support from Seaway, Head North and Sorority Noise.[25]

On February 11, 2016, a music video was released for "Pretense".[28] The video was directed by YEAH! Films[29] and filmed in Canada a few weeks prior.[28] In February and March, the band supported Neck Deep and State Champs on their co-headlining U.S. tour.[30] In March and April, the band went on their first UK headlining tour with support from Seaway and Boston Manor.[31] The band went on the 2016 edition of Warped Tour.[32] From mid October to late November, the band supported The Wonder Years on their tour of the U.S.[33] The band are set to support Real Friends on their tour of the UK in December.[34]

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AbsolutePunk8/10[35]
AllMusicFavorable[1]
Blunt Magazine3/5[36]
Cleveland.comB+[3]
Punknews.org3/5 stars[37]
Rock Sound8/10[2]

Critical response[edit]

Reviewing the album for Rock Sound, Jack Rogers said it delivers "the sort of shirt tugging poignancy" the band are known for. Rogers mentioned that album shows off "their emotionally dented style" beating their peers. Overall, he noted that they "invested every ounce" of themselves to create a "damn fine pop-punk debut."[2] Cleveland.com reviewer Troy L. Smith noted that people who liked early 2000s pop punk albums such as Simple Plan's No Pads, No Helmets...Just Balls (2002) and New Found Glory's Sticks and Stones (2002) would enjoy Copacetic. Smith wrote that Taylor's vocals was "a nice change of pace" compared to pop punk's typical "whiny vocals". Smith ended with making mention of the band taking risks, such as the eight-minute closing track "Untitled".[3] AllMusic reviewer Timothy Monger noted the album's sound "[r]anging from blazing, epic emo and pop-punk to slower, more contemplative fare."[1]

Punknews.org staff member RENALDO69 wrote that the album had "subtle new bends in it" but kept to the band's sound of their EPs. RENALDO69 clarified that although this wasn't "a bad thing", the album was weighed down by "too much cookie-cutter and filler". They mentioned that the band leaned towards a "more pop side of the punk spectrum", resulting in the album sounding "a bit stagnant."[37] AbsolutePunk reviewer Blake Solomon wrote that the group's sound had matured, providing "instrumental denouements" and "actually interesting" slow-paced songs. He noted that album did "an admirable job recreating the peaks and valleys of sorrow." Solomon mentioned how pop punk was a genre that references the past, while closing with the album being "just as interested in our uncertain futures."[35]

Commercial performance and accolades[edit]

Copacetic sold 8,482 copies in the first week,[38] charting in the U.S. at number 61 on the Billboard 200.[39] The album also charted at number 3 on the Hard Rock Albums chart,[40] number 4 on both the Alternative Albums[41] and Top Internet Albums charts,[38] number 5 on the Independent Albums chart,[42] and number 6 on the Top Rock Albums[43] and Vinyl Albums charts.[38] The album charted in the UK at number 12 on the Independent Album Breakers chart,[44] number 28 on the Rock & Metal Albums chart,[45] and number 47 on the Independent Albums chart.[46]

Copacetic was included at number 9 on Rock Sound's top 50 releases of 2015 list.[47] It was also nominated for Album Of The Year at the 2016 Alternative Press Music Awards.[48]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Knuckle Puck[49].

No.TitleLength
1."Wall to Wall (Depreciation)"2:18
2."Disdain"2:44
3."Poison Pen Letter"3:39
4."Swing"3:43
5."Ponder"2:10
6."Evergreen"3:28
7."True Contrite"4:55
8."Stationary"2:05
9."In Your Crosshairs"4:42
10."Pretense"3:05
11."Untitled"7:51
Total length:40:47

Personnel[edit]

Personnel per booklet.[15]

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (2015) Peak
position
UK Independent Albums[46] 47
UK Independent Album Breakers[44] 12
UK Rock & Metal Albums[45] 28
U.S. Billboard 200[39] 61
U.S. Billboard Alternative Albums[41] 4
U.S. Billboard Hard Rock Albums[40] 3
U.S. Billboard Independent Albums[42] 5
U.S. Billboard Top Internet Albums[38] 4
U.S. Billboard Top Rock Albums[43] 6
U.S. Billboard Vinyl Albums[38] 13

References[edit]

Footnotes

  1. ^ U.S. Rise RISE 278-2

Citations

  1. ^ a b c d Monger, Timothy. "Copacetic - Knuckle Puck | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on December 10, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c Rogers 2015, p. 80
  3. ^ a b c Smith, Troy L. (July 31, 2015). "Album Review: Knuckle Puck's 'Copacetic' defines pop punk for a new generation". cleveland.com. Archived from the original on August 10, 2015. Retrieved August 10, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Galil, Leor (July 21, 2015). "Knuckle Puck do for pop-punk what elastic does for sweatpants". Chicago Reader. Archived from the original on August 10, 2015. Retrieved August 10, 2015. 
  5. ^ a b Pearlman 2015, p. 70
  6. ^ a b c Pearlman 2015, p. 71
  7. ^ Rock Sound (October 16, 2014). "Listen To A Brand New Knuckle Puck Track With Rock Sound". Rock Sound. Archived from the original on July 24, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2015. 
  8. ^ Sharp, Tyler (September 29, 2014). "Modern Baseball, Knuckle Puck, more announce fall tour". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on November 10, 2016. Retrieved July 23, 2015. 
  9. ^ a b Sharp, Tyler (December 22, 2014). "Knuckle Puck Sign to Rise Records". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on December 24, 2014. Retrieved July 23, 2015. 
  10. ^ DiVincenzo, Alex (December 22, 2014). "Knuckle Puck Signs to Rise Records, LP Coming Summer 2015". AbsolutePunk.net. Retrieved July 23, 2015. 
  11. ^ a b c Sharp, Elliott (July 23, 2015). "Listen: Knuckle Puck's 'Copacetic' Album Premiere". redbull.com. Archived from the original on July 23, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2015. 
  12. ^ Walker 2015, p. 14
  13. ^ Sharp, Tyler (February 26, 2015). "Knuckle Puck begin recording debut full-length album". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on March 2, 2015. Retrieved June 13, 2015. 
  14. ^ Sharp, Tyler (April 1, 2015). "Knuckle Puck finish recording debut album". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on April 4, 2015. Retrieved June 13, 2015. 
  15. ^ a b c d Copacetic (Booklet). Knuckle Puck. Rise. 2015. RISE 278-2. 
  16. ^ a b Sharp, Tyler (June 11, 2015). "Knuckle Puck announce debut album, 'Copacetic'". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on June 13, 2015. Retrieved June 11, 2015. 
  17. ^ Sharp, Tyler (June 19, 2015). "Knuckle Puck give first taste of debut album with "Disdain"". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on June 22, 2015. Retrieved June 19, 2015. 
  18. ^ Rise Records (June 19, 2015). Knuckle Puck - Disdain (Official Music Video). YouTube. Archived from the original on August 21, 2015. Retrieved August 10, 2015. 
  19. ^ Palmedo, Tree (June 30, 2015). "Knuckle Puck Set Amps and Emotions to Max on 'True Contrite'". Spin. Archived from the original on June 30, 2015. Retrieved June 30, 2015. 
  20. ^ Sharp, Tyler (April 8, 2015). "Senses Fail, Knuckle Puck, Miss May I, more announced for Warped Tour 2015". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on April 10, 2015. Retrieved June 13, 2015. 
  21. ^ "Disdain - Knuckle Puck | Release Info". AllMusic. Archived from the original on September 17, 2015. Retrieved September 17, 2015. 
  22. ^ "True Contrite - Knuckle Puck | Release Info". AllMusic. Archived from the original on September 17, 2015. Retrieved September 17, 2015. 
  23. ^ Biddulph, Andy (July 14, 2015). "Knuckle Puck Are One Of The Brightest Pop-Punk Bands In The Game. Here's Why". Rock Sound. Archived from the original on July 15, 2015. Retrieved July 14, 2015. 
  24. ^ Biddulph, Andy (July 23, 2015). "Stream The New Knuckle Puck Album". Rock Sound. Archived from the original on July 23, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2015. 
  25. ^ a b c d e Payne, Chris (August 10, 2015). "Knuckle Puck Smash Chairs in Polaroid/Feeling-Filled 'True Contrite' Video". Billboard. Archived from the original on August 10, 2015. Retrieved August 10, 2015. 
  26. ^ Rise Records (July 30, 2015). Knuckle Puck - True Contrite (Official Music Video). YouTube. Archived from the original on August 10, 2015. Retrieved August 10, 2015. 
  27. ^ Pierangelo, Hannah (May 26, 2015). "State Champs Announce Fall European Headliner". idobi.com. Archived from the original on June 15, 2015. Retrieved June 13, 2015. 
  28. ^ a b Garner, George (February 11, 2016). "Knuckle Puck Unveil New Video For Pretense". Kerrang!. Archived from the original on February 13, 2016. Retrieved February 13, 2016. 
  29. ^ Rise Records (February 11, 2016). Knuckle Puck - Pretense (Official Music Video). YouTube. Archived from the original on April 24, 2016. Retrieved February 13, 2016. 
  30. ^ Tate, Jason (December 7, 2015). "Alt Press Tour: State Champs + Neck Deep". AbsolutePunk.net. Retrieved March 11, 2016. [dead link]
  31. ^ James (November 23, 2015). "Knuckle Puck Announce 2016 UK Headline Tour". Kerrang!. Archived from the original on November 24, 2015. Retrieved February 13, 2016. 
  32. ^ Sharp, Tyler (March 22, 2016). "10 more bands announced for Warped Tour 2016". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on March 23, 2016. Retrieved March 22, 2016. 
  33. ^ Sharp, Tyler (August 15, 2016). "The Wonder Years, Real Friends, Knuckle Puck, others announce tour". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. Archived from the original on February 2, 2017. Retrieved January 23, 2017. 
  34. ^ Stam, Janneke (May 23, 2016). "Real Friends Have Announced A Tour". Rock Sound. Archived from the original on May 24, 2016. Retrieved May 23, 2016. 
  35. ^ a b Solomon, Blake. "Knuckle Puck - Copacetic - Album Review". AbsolutePunk.net. Archived from the original on August 11, 2015. Retrieved August 11, 2015. 
  36. ^ O'Connor 2015, p. 67
  37. ^ a b RENALDO69 (July 28, 2015). "Knuckle Puck - Copacetic". Punknews.org. Archived from the original on August 10, 2015. Retrieved August 11, 2015. 
  38. ^ a b c d e Knuckle Puck (August 19, 2015). "Knuckle Puck on Twitter". Twitter. Archived from the original on August 19, 2015. Retrieved August 19, 2015. 
  39. ^ a b "Knuckle Puck - Chart history (Billboard 200)". Billboard. Archived from the original on April 27, 2016. Retrieved August 11, 2015. 
  40. ^ a b "Knuckle Puck - Chart history (Hard Rock Albums)". Billboard. Archived from the original on April 27, 2016. Retrieved August 11, 2015. 
  41. ^ a b "Knuckle Puck - Chart history (Alternative Albums)". Billboard. Archived from the original on April 27, 2016. Retrieved August 11, 2015. 
  42. ^ a b "Knuckle Puck - Chart history (Independent Albums)". Billboard. Archived from the original on April 27, 2016. Retrieved August 11, 2015. 
  43. ^ a b "Knuckle Puck - Chart history (Top Rock Albums)". Billboard. Archived from the original on April 27, 2016. Retrieved August 11, 2015. 
  44. ^ a b "Official Independent Album Breakers Chart Top 20". officialcharts.com. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved August 28, 2015. 
  45. ^ a b "Official Rock & Metal Albums Chart Top 40". officialcharts.com. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved August 28, 2015. 
  46. ^ a b "Official Independent Albums Chart Top 50". officialcharts.com. Archived from the original on June 3, 2016. Retrieved August 28, 2015. 
  47. ^ Bird, ed. 2016, p. 28
  48. ^ Whitt, Cassie (March 18, 2016). "Here are the nominees for the 2016 AP Music Awards!". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on April 23, 2016. Retrieved May 1, 2016. 
  49. ^ "BMI | Repertoire Search". BMI. Retrieved October 30, 2015.  Click on the individual entries of the Copacetic songs for the writing credits.

Sources

  • Bird, Ryan, ed. (January 2016). "Top 50 Releases of the Year". Rock Sound. No. 208. London: Freeway Press Inc. ISSN 1465-0185. 
  • O'Connor, Sarah. Simmons, Amy, ed. "In Review". Blunt. No. 140. Sydney: nextmedia. ISSN 1445-6974. 
  • Pearlman, Mischa (Summer 2015). Bird, Ryan, ed. "Everything Is Alright". Rock Sound. No. 203. London: Freeway Press Inc. ISSN 1465-0185. 
  • Rogers, Jack (Summer 2015). Bird, Ryan, ed. "Reviews". Rock Sound. No. 203. London: Freeway Press Inc. ISSN 1465-0185. 
  • Walker, Jennyfer J. (August 1, 2015). McMahon, James, ed. "Fresh Blood: Rock's Breaking Bands". Kerrang!. No. 1579. London: Bauer Media Group. ISSN 0262-6624. 

External links[edit]