Coppa Campioni d'Italia

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The Coppa Campioni d'Italia is the trophy that in Italian football represents the victory of the Serie A championship.

The trophy was created in 1960 by sculptor and medalist Ettore Calvelli; has a height of 45 cm around and weighs about 5 kg, rests on a stone base hard blue sodalite and has at its center a ring of gold depicting an allegory of athletes; between 2015 and 2016, these dimensions increased (specifically, about 20 cm in height) for television requirements.[1] The Cup has a value of about 60,000 euro and bears engraved on golden base, the names of all the teams that have won the top division since the season 1960–61.

The first team to be awarded the Coppa Campioni d'Italia was Juventus in 1961, the same club as in 2005 received the trophy for the first time on the field.

The original trophy remains property of the Lega Serie A and is only held in custody by the winning club; when returned the club receives a reduced scale model to be exhibited in their trophy room.[2]

List of winners[edit]

Season Winner Manager Captain
1960–61
Juventus Italy Argentina Renato Cesarini Italy Argentina Omar Sívori
1961–62
Milan Italy Nereo Rocco Italy Cesare Maldini
1962–63
Internazionale Argentina Helenio Herrera Italy Giacinto Facchetti
1963–64
Bologna Italy Fulvio Bernardini Italy Giacomo Bulgarelli
1964–65
Internazionale Argentina Helenio Herrera Italy Armando Picchi
1965–66
Internazionale Argentina Helenio Herrera Italy Armando Picchi
1966–67
Juventus Paraguay Heriberto Herrera Italy Ernesto Castano
1967–68
Milan Italy Nereo Rocco Italy Gianni Rivera
1968–69
Fiorentina Italy Bruno Pesaola Italy Giancarlo De Sisti
1969–70
Cagliari Italy Manlio Scopigno Italy Pierluigi Cera
1970–71
Internazionale Italy Giovanni Invernizzi Italy Giacinto Facchetti
1971–72
Juventus Czechoslovakia Čestmír Vycpálek Italy Sandro Salvadore
1972–73
Juventus Czechoslovakia Čestmír Vycpálek Italy Sandro Salvadore
1973–74
Lazio Italy Tommaso Maestrelli Italy United Kingdom Giuseppe Wilson
1974–75
Juventus Italy Carlo Parola Italy Giuseppe Furino
1975–76
Torino Italy Luigi Radice Italy Claudio Sala
1976–77
Juventus Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Giuseppe Furino
1977–78
Juventus Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Giuseppe Furino
1978–79
Milan Sweden Nils Liedholm Italy Gianni Rivera
1979–80
Internazionale Italy Eugenio Bersellini Italy Graziano Bini
1980–81
Juventus Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Giuseppe Furino
1981–82
Juventus Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Giuseppe Furino
1982–83
Roma Sweden Nils Liedholm Italy Agostino Di Bartolomei
1983–84
Juventus Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Gaetano Scirea
1984–85
Verona Italy Osvaldo Bagnoli Italy Roberto Tricella
1985–86
Juventus Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Gaetano Scirea
1986–87
Napoli Italy Ottavio Bianchi Argentina Diego Maradona
1987–88
Milan Italy Arrigo Sacchi Italy Franco Baresi
1988–89
Internazionale Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Italy Giuseppe Baresi
1989–90
Napoli Italy Alberto Bigon Argentina Diego Maradona
1990–91
Sampdoria Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Vujadin Boškov Italy Luca Pellegrini
1991–92
Milan Italy Fabio Capello Italy Franco Baresi
1992–93
Milan Italy Fabio Capello Italy Franco Baresi
1993–94
Milan Italy Fabio Capello Italy Franco Baresi
1994–95
Juventus Italy Marcello Lippi Italy Roberto Baggio
1995–96
Milan Italy Fabio Capello Italy Franco Baresi
1996–97
Juventus Italy Marcello Lippi Italy Antonio Conte
1997–98
Juventus Italy Marcello Lippi Italy Antonio Conte
1998–99
Milan Italy Alberto Zaccheroni Italy Paolo Maldini
1999–2000
Lazio Sweden Sven-Göran Eriksson Italy Alessandro Nesta
2000–01
Roma Italy Fabio Capello Italy Francesco Totti
2001–02
Juventus Italy Marcello Lippi Italy Alessandro Del Piero
2002–03
Juventus Italy Marcello Lippi Italy Alessandro Del Piero
2003–04
Milan Italy Carlo Ancelotti Italy Paolo Maldini
2004–05
Title stripped from Juventus
2005–06
Internazionale Italy Roberto Mancini Argentina Javier Zanetti
2006–07
Internazionale Italy Roberto Mancini Argentina Javier Zanetti
2007–08
Internazionale Italy Roberto Mancini Argentina Javier Zanetti
2008–09
Internazionale Portugal José Mourinho Argentina Javier Zanetti
2009–10
Internazionale Portugal José Mourinho Argentina Javier Zanetti
2010–11
Milan Italy Massimiliano Allegri Italy Massimo Ambrosini
2011–12 Juventus Italy Antonio Conte Italy Alessandro Del Piero
2012–13 Juventus Italy Antonio Conte Italy Gianluigi Buffon
2013–14 Juventus Italy Antonio Conte Italy Gianluigi Buffon
2014–15 Juventus Italy Massimiliano Allegri Italy Gianluigi Buffon
2015–16 Juventus Italy Massimiliano Allegri Italy Gianluigi Buffon
2016–17 Juventus Italy Massimiliano Allegri Italy Gianluigi Buffon
2017–18 Juventus Italy Massimiliano Allegri Italy Gianluigi Buffon

Number of cups for every club[edit]

Club N. of cups Championship seasons
Juventus 23 1960–61, 1966–67, 1971–72, 1972–73, 1974–75, 1976-77, 1977–78, 1980–81, 1981–82, 1983–84, 1985–86, 1994–95, 1996–97, 1997–98, 2001–02, 2002–03, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18
Milan 11 1961–62, 1967–68, 1978–79, 1987–88, 1991–92, 1992–93, 1993–94, 1995–96, 1998–99, 2003–04, 2010–11
Internazionale 11 1962–63, 1964–65, 1965–66, 1970–71, 1979–80, 1988–89, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10
Roma 2 1982–83, 2000–01
Lazio 2 1973–74, 1999–2000
Napoli 2 1986–87, 1989–90
Torino 1 1975–76
Bologna 1 1963–64
Fiorentina 1 1968–69
Cagliari 1 1969–70
Verona 1 1984–85
Sampdoria 1 1990–91

Bold indicates clubs currently playing in the top division.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Guido Vaciago (31 May 2016). "Juventus, la coppa Scudetto è cresciuta! Lo ha chiesto la tv..." (in Italian). tuttosport.com.
  2. ^ Premiazione scudetto (PDF). legaseriea.it (in Italian). Lega Nazionale Professionisti Serie A. 13 May 2011.