Cactus Bowl

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For the Division II bowl game of the same name played from 2001 through 2011, see Cactus Bowl (Division II).
Cactus Bowl
Motel 6 Cactus Bowl
Motel6CactusBowl.png
Stadium Chase Field
Location Phoenix, Arizona
Previous stadiums Arizona Stadium (1989–1999)
Bank One Ballpark (2000–2005)
Sun Devil Stadium (2006–2015)
Previous locations Tucson, Arizona (1989–1999)
Phoenix, Arizona (2000–2005)
Tempe, Arizona (2006–2015)
Operated 1989–present
Conference tie-ins Big 12, Pac-12
Previous conference tie-ins WAC (1990–1997)
Big 12 (1998–2001)
Big East (1998–2005)
Pac-10 (2002–2005)
Payout US$3.35 million per team (as of 2015)[1]
Sponsors
Domino's Pizza (1990–1991)
Weiser Lock (1992–1995)
Insight Enterprises (1997–2011)
Buffalo Wild Wings (2012–2013)
TicketCity (2015)
Motel 6 (2016–present)
Former names
Copper Bowl (1989)
Domino's Pizza Copper Bowl (1990–1991)
Weiser Lock Copper Bowl (1992–1995)
Copper Bowl (1996)
Insight.com Bowl (1997–2001)
Insight Bowl (2002–2011)
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl (2012–2013)
TicketCity Cactus Bowl (2015)
2016 matchup
Boise State vs. Baylor (Baylor 31–12)

The Cactus Bowl, officially the Motel 6 Cactus Bowl for sponsorship purposes, is an NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision college football bowl game that has been played in the state of Arizona since 1989.

Originally played as the Copper Bowl from inception through 1996, it was known as the Insight.com Bowl from 1997 through 2001, then the Insight Bowl from 2002 through 2011, and then the Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl for 2012 and 2013. The Cactus Bowl name has been in use since 2015. There was no game played during calendar year 2014 due to the schedule date moving from December to January; the game was played twice during 2016, due to the schedule date moving back to December.

Originally played at Arizona Stadium in Tucson, the game moved to Bank One Ballpark (now Chase Field) in Phoenix in 2000, and then to Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe in 2006. For the 2015 through 2017 seasons, the Cactus Bowl is being played at its previous home of Chase Field in Phoenix while Sun Devil Stadium undergoes renovations.[2] During this time, the game will be one of four bowl games that are played in baseball-specific stadiums; the Miami Beach Bowl, played at Marlins Park, the St. Petersburg Bowl, played at Tropicana Field, and the Pinstripe Bowl, played at Yankee Stadium, are the others.

History[edit]

"Cactus Bowl" had been the originally planned name for what became the Copper Bowl in 1989.[3] The game was played under the Copper Bowl name through 1996, after which title sponsorship rights were assumed by Insight Enterprises, who self-titled the game from 1997 through the 2011. In 2012, restaurant chain Buffalo Wild Wings became the sponsor and self-titled the game for two years.[4] Buffalo Wild Wings declined to renew sponsorship following the 2013 game,[5] at which time organizers opted to rename the game "Cactus Bowl" rather than reverting to the Copper Bowl name. There had been a Texas-based Cactus Bowl played in Division II, however that game was discontinued after 2011. For 2014, TicketCity sponsored the new Cactus Bowl,[6] and Motel 6 became the sponsor in 2015.[7]

For the first ten years, the game was played at Arizona Stadium, on the campus of the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. In 2000, the bowl's organizers moved the game to Bank One Ballpark, a baseball-specific stadium, in downtown Phoenix. In 2006, the game moved to Sun Devil Stadium at Arizona State University in Tempe to replace the Fiesta Bowl, which had moved to University of Phoenix Stadium in the Phoenix suburb of Glendale. The 2006 game set a record (since tied in the 2016 Alamo Bowl) for the biggest comeback in NCAA Division I FBS bowl history,[8] as Texas Tech came back from a 38–7 third-quarter deficit to defeat Minnesota 44–41 in overtime.

Before 2006, the game mainly featured teams from the Pac-10, WAC, Big 12, and old Big East conferences. Starting in 2006, it began featuring an annual matchup between teams from the Big Ten and the Big 12. Starting with the 2015 game, it has featured a matchup between Pac-12 and Big 12 teams, contingent on bowl eligibility. Teams from the ACC and MW have also competed, along with teams from the now defunct SWC and Big Eight, and one independent school (Notre Dame in 2004).

For the first three playings of the Copper Bowl, TBS carried the game. Beginning in 1992 and continuing until the 2005 playing, the game aired on ESPN. After a four-year hiatus, during which NFL Network carried the game, ESPN regained the rights beginning in 2010.

Game results[edit]

No. Name Date Winning Team Losing Team Site Attendance Notes
1 1989 Copper Bowl December 31, 1989 Arizona 17 North Carolina State 10 Arizona Stadium

Tucson, AZ
37,237
2 1990 Copper Bowl December 31, 1990 California 17 Wyoming 15 36,340
3 1991 Copper Bowl December 31, 1991 Indiana 24 Baylor 0 35,751
4 1992 Copper Bowl December 31, 1992 Washington State 31 Utah 28 40,826
5 1993 Copper Bowl December 29, 1993 Kansas State 52 Wyoming 17 49,075
6 1994 Copper Bowl December 29, 1994 BYU 31 Oklahoma 6 45,122
7 1995 Copper Bowl December 27, 1995 Texas Tech 55 Air Force 41 41,004
8 1996 Copper Bowl December 27, 1996 Wisconsin 38 Utah 10 42,122
9 1997 Insight.com Bowl December 27, 1997 Arizona 20 New Mexico 14 49,385
10 1998 Insight.com Bowl December 26, 1998 Missouri 34 West Virginia 31 36,147
11 1999 Insight.com Bowl December 31, 1999 Colorado 62 Boston College 28 35,762
12 2000 Insight.com Bowl December 28, 2000 Iowa State 37 Pittsburgh 29 Bank One Ballpark

Phoenix, AZ
41,813
13 2001 Insight.com Bowl December 29, 2001 Syracuse 26 Kansas State 3 40,028
14 2002 Insight Bowl December 26, 2002 Pittsburgh 38 Oregon State 13 40,533
15 2003 Insight Bowl December 26, 2003 California 52 Virginia Tech 49 42,364
16 2004 Insight Bowl December 28, 2004 Oregon State 38 Notre Dame 21 45,917
17 2005 Insight Bowl December 27, 2005 Arizona State 45 Rutgers 40 43,536
18 2006 Insight Bowl December 29, 2006 Texas Tech 44 Minnesota 41 Sun Devil Stadium

Tempe, AZ
48,391 OT
19 2007 Insight Bowl December 31, 2007 Oklahoma State 49 Indiana 33 48,892
20 2008 Insight Bowl December 31, 2008 Kansas 42 Minnesota 21 49,103
21 2009 Insight Bowl December 31, 2009 Iowa State 14 Minnesota 13 45,090
22 2010 Insight Bowl December 28, 2010 Iowa 27 Missouri 24 53,453
23 2011 Insight Bowl December 30, 2011 Oklahoma 31 Iowa 14 54,247
24 2012 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl December 29, 2012 Michigan State 17 TCU 16 44,617
25 2013 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl December 28, 2013 Kansas State 31 Michigan 14 53,284
26 2015 Cactus Bowl January 2, 2015 Oklahoma State 30 Washington 22 35,409
27 2016 Cactus Bowl (January) January 2, 2016 West Virginia 43 Arizona State 42 Chase Field
Phoenix, AZ
39,321
28 2016 Cactus Bowl (December) December 27, 2016 Baylor 31 Boise State 12 33,328

MVPs[edit]

Two MVPs are selected for each game; one an offensive player, the other a defensive player.
In three instances (1992, 1994, and 1995) offensive co-MVPs were named, along with one defensive MVP.

Most appearances[edit]

Media coverage[edit]

The Cactus Bowl has been broadcast by three different networks, TBS (1989–1991), ESPN (1992–2005, 2010–2016), and NFL Network (2006–2009)

Television[edit]

Date Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Sideline reporters
1989 TBS Bob Neal Tim Foley
1990 Bob Neal Tim Foley
1991 Ron Thulin Pat Haden
1992 ESPN Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried
1993 Kevin Harlan Craig James
1994 Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried
1995 Brad Nessler Gary Danielson
1996 Brad Nessler Gary Danielson
1997 Charley Steiner Todd Christensen Sean Salisbury
1998 Dave Barnett Bill Curry
1999 Mike Tirico Rod Gilmore
2000 Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried
2001 Dave Barnett Rod Gilmore
2002 Dave Barnett Mike Golic & Bill Curry Dave Ryan
2003 Mark Malone Mike Golic Rob Stone
2004 Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried Erin Andrews
2005 Brent Musburger Gary Danielson
2006 NFL Network Derrin Horton Dick Vermeil Alex Flanagan
2007 Bob Papa Sterling Sharpe Mike Mayock
2008 Paul Burmeister Mike Mayock Stacey Dales
2009 Paul Burmeister Mike Mayock Stacey Dales
2010 ESPN Sean McDonough Matt Millen Heather Cox
2011 Sean McDonough Matt Millen Heather Cox
2012 Brad Nessler Todd Blackledge Holly Rowe
2013 Sean McDonough Chris Spielman Shannon Spake
2015 Dave Flemming Danny Kanell Allison Williams
2016 (Jan.) Dave Neal Matt Stinchcomb Kayce Smith
2016 (Dec.) Rece Davis Joey Galloway & David Pollack Molly McGrath

Radio[edit]

Date Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Sideline reporters
2001 Nevada Sports Network
2002
2003
2004
2008 Sports USA Eli Gold John Robinson and Tony Graziani
2009 Westwood One Kevin Kugler Terry Donahue
2010 ESPN Radio Bill Rosinski David Norrie Joe Schad
2011 Bill Rosinski David Norrie Joe Schad
2012 Bill Rosinski David Norrie Joe Schad
2013 Bill Rosinski David Norrie Joe Schad
2015 Mark Neely David Diaz-Infante Dave Shore
2016 (Jan.) Drew Goodman David Diaz-Infante Olivia Harlan
2016 (Dec.) Clay Matvick Dusty Dvoracek Dawn Davenport

Wins by conference[edit]

Conference Appearances Wins Losses Pct.
Big 12 15 12 3 .800
Pac-10 / Pac-12 10 7 3 .700
Big Ten 10 4 6 .400
Big East 7 2 5 .286
WAC 7 1 6 .143
Big Eight 2 1 1 .500
SWC 2 1 1 .500
ACC 1 0 1 .000
Mountain West 1 0 1 .000
Independent 1 0 1 .000

Previous logos[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.statisticbrain.com/college-bowl-game-payouts/
  2. ^ http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/12817055/cactus-bowl-moving-chase-field
  3. ^ "New bowl game seeking sponsor, TV pact". The Tuscaloosa News. 1988-08-13. Retrieved 2014-12-30. 
  4. ^ "Insight Bowl loses its title sponsor after 15 years,". Sports Illustrated. Associated Press. 26 January 2012. Retrieved 26 January 2012. 
  5. ^ "Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl loses sponsorship". azcentral. 16 June 2014. 
  6. ^ "TicketCity gets Cactus Bowl naming rights for Cactus Bowl in Tempe". Phoenix Business Journal. 2014-11-25. Retrieved 2014-12-30. 
  7. ^ "Motel 6 inks naming rights deal for Cactus Bowl". Phoenix Business Journal. Retrieved 24 November 2015. 
  8. ^ "Down 31, Texas Tech rallies for biggest bowl comeback". Associated Press via ESPN. December 29, 2006. Archived from the original on 2 January 2007. Retrieved 30 December 2006. 

External links[edit]