Coquille Myrtle Grove State Natural Site

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Coquille Myrtle Grove State Natural Site
Coquille Myrtle Grove State Natural Site.jpg
Picnic table at the site along the South Fork Coquille River
Coquille Myrtle Grove State Natural Site is located in Oregon
Coquille Myrtle Grove State Natural Site
Type Public, state
Location Coos County, Oregon
Nearest city Myrtle Point
Coordinates 42°57′44″N 124°06′24″W / 42.9623321°N 124.1067663°W / 42.9623321; -124.1067663Coordinates: 42°57′44″N 124°06′24″W / 42.9623321°N 124.1067663°W / 42.9623321; -124.1067663[1]
Area 7 acres (2.8 ha)[2]
Created 1950[2]
Operated by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
Open Day-use, year-round

Coquille Myrtle Grove State Natural Site is a state park administered by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department in the U.S. state of Oregon. The park, bordering the Powers Highway (Oregon Route 542) between Myrtle Point and Powers, in Coos County, features a swimming hole and sandy beach along the South Fork Coquille River. Other amenities include parking, picnic tables, restrooms, and access to fishing but no drinking water.[3]

The Save the Myrtlewoods organization donated the land for the park in 1950. Subject to occasional flooding, the 7-acre (2.8 ha) park contains a stand of Oregon myrtle trees.[2] The Oregon myrtle, also known as California laurel or Pacific myrtle, is a slow-growing hardwood often turned into lumber to make furniture, cabinets, and specialty items such as plates and bowls. Many of the larger stands, found at low elevation along the Pacific coast between lower California and Coos Bay, have been cut.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Coquille Myrtle Grove State Park". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2011-06-26. 
  2. ^ a b c "Park History". Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Retrieved May 18, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Coquille Myrtle Grove State Natural Site". Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Retrieved May 18, 2016. 
  4. ^ Bannan, Jan (2002). Oregon State Parks: A Complete Recreation Guide (second edition). Seattle: The Mountaineers Books. p. 39. ISBN 0-89886-794-0.