Corday-Morgan Prize

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Corday-Morgan Medal and Prize
Corday Morgan Obverse.jpg
The obverse of a Corday Morgan medal awarded in the early 2000s. The crab on the medal is a reference to Morgan's work on the chelate effect
Awarded forThe most meritorious contributions to chemistry
Sponsored byRoyal Society of Chemistry
Date1949 (1949)
Reward(s)£5000
Websitersc.org/ScienceAndTechnology/Awards/CordayMorganPrizes

The Corday–Morgan Medal and Prize is awarded by the Royal Society of Chemistry for the most meritorious contributions to experimental chemistry, including computer simulation.[1] The prize was established by chemist Gilbert Morgan, who named it after his father Thomas Morgan and his mother Mary-Louise Corday.[1] From the award's inception in 1949 until 1980 it was awarded by the Chemical Society.[citation needed] Up to three prizes are awarded annually.[1]

The reverse of the Corday Morgan medal.

Recipients[edit]

The Corday–Morgan medallists have included many of the UK's most successful chemists. Since 1949 they have been:[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Corday–Morgan Medal and Prize". Retrieved 19 March 2013.
  2. ^ "RSC Corday-Morgan Prize Previous Winners". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  3. ^ "RSC Corday-Morgan Prize 2018 Winner". www.rsc.org. Retrieved 2018-05-16.
  4. ^ "RSC Corday-Morgan Prize 2018 Winner". www.rsc.org. Retrieved 2018-05-16.
  5. ^ "RSC Corday-Morgan Prize 2018 Winner". www.rsc.org. Retrieved 2018-05-16.
  6. ^ "Royal Society of Chemistry Prizes and Awards 2016". Royal Society of Chemistry. Archived from the original on 10 May 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2017.
  7. ^ "Royal Society of Chemistry Prizes and Awards 2015". Royal Society of Chemistry. Archived from the original on 20 February 2016. Retrieved 7 May 2015.
  8. ^ "Winners of RSC Prizes and Awards 2014". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  9. ^ "David Husain: Enterprising physical chemist". The Independent. 3 April 2008. Retrieved 9 September 2018.