Corinth and Counce Railroad

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Corinth and Counce Railroad
Reporting mark CCR
Locale Mississippi, Tennessee
Dates of operation 1959–1991
Successor Kansas City Southern
Track gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Length 16.15 miles
Headquarters Counce, Tennessee


The Corinth and Counce Railroad was a Class III railroad operating freight service between Mississippi and Tennessee. The line was built in 1959, expanded in 1974 and sold in 1991 to a new owner who changed the railroad's name. Today, some of the Corinth and Counce's trackage is operated by the Kansas City Southern Railway.

History[edit]

On November 26, 1958, the Corinth and Counce Railroad Company was incorporated to build a new, 16.15-mile (25.99 km) line of railroad between Corinth, Mississippi, where it connected with the Illinois Central Gulf Railroad and the Southern Railway, and Counce, Tennessee.[1]

The Corinth and Counce began operations on September 1, 1959.[1] The company's corporate offices were located in Counce, while there were engine houses in both Counce and Corinth.[2]

The Packaging Corporation of America acquired control of the Corinth and Counce on February 27, 1970.[1]

On August 12, 1974, the Interstate Commerce Commission and the Tennessee Valley Authority authorized the railroad to begin operations over a 10-mile branch line between Sharp, Mississippi and Yellow Creek, Mississippi.[1][3]

By the 1970s, the railroad's traffic included lumber, pulp, paper products, coiled steel and steel pipe.[1]

On December 31, 1991, the Corinth and Counce was sold to the MidSouth Rail Corporation, which changed the railroad's name to Tennrail.[4] On January 1, 1994, Tennrail was merged into the Kansas City Southern Railway.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Lewis, Edward A. American Short Line Railway Guide. The Baggage Car. p. 100. 
  2. ^ Lewis, Edward A. American Short Line Railway Guide. Kalmbach Books. p. 72. 
  3. ^ Lewis, Edward A. American Short Line Railway Guide. Kalmbach Books. p. 64. 
  4. ^ Lewis, Edward A. American Short Line Railway Guide. Kalmbach Books. p. 356. 
  5. ^ Lewis, Edward A. American Short Line Railway Guide. Kalmbach Books. p. 361.