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Cork City Council

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Cork City Council

Comhairle Cathrach Chorcaí
Coat of arms or logo
Type
Type
Leadership
Kieran McCarthy, Ind
Structure
Seats31
Political groups
Elections
Single transferable vote
Last election
7 June 2024
Motto
Latin: Statio Bene Fida Carinis
"A safe harbour for ships"[1][2]
Meeting place
City Hall, Cork
Website
Official website Edit this at Wikidata
The area governed by the council prior to the 2019 boundary extension

Cork City Council (Irish: Comhairle Cathrach Chorcaí) is the local authority of the city of Cork in Ireland. As a city council, it is governed by the Local Government Act 2001. Before 1 January 2002, the council was known as Cork Corporation. The council is responsible for housing and community, roads and transportation, urban planning and development, amenity and culture, environment and the management of some emergency services (including Cork City Fire Brigade).[3] The council has 31 elected members. Elections are held every five years and are by single transferable vote. The head of the council is elected on an annual basis and has the honorific title of Lord Mayor. The city administration is headed by a chief executive, Ann Doherty. The council meets at City Hall, Cork.

Boundary changes[edit]

The area under the administration of Cork City Council was expanded in 1840, in 1955 and in 1965.[4][5][6]

The area was extended from 31 May 2019, taking in territory under the administration of Cork County Council.[7] This implemented changes under the Local Government Act 2019.[8]

The 2015 Cork Local Government Review recommended merging Cork City Council and Cork County Council into a single "super council", within which a metropolitan district council will govern the Metropolitan Cork area; however, a minority report opposed the merger.[9][10] This was subsequently followed in 2017 by a report published by an expert advisory group recommending a city boundary extension.[11] The city boundary was to be extended to include Little Island, Cork Airport, Ballincollig, Blarney, and Carrigtwohill, adding a population of over 100,000, however the final extension will not include either Little Island or Carrigtwohill.[12] Places farther out will remain part of the county, including Cobh, Carrigaline, and Midleton, as well as Ringaskiddy, the centre of the Port of Cork.[12] The report gives parameters for compensation to be paid by the city to the county for the consequent reduction in its revenue.[13][14] The revised proposal was welcomed by Micheál Martin but criticised by some county councillors.[12] The city council voted unanimously to accept it.[15] Barry Roche of The Irish Times wrote that the Mackinnon Report "has proven almost as divisive as its predecessor", except with the city and county councils' positions reversed.[16] On 6 June 2018 Cabinet approval was given for the boundary extension, to include the surrounding areas of Cork Airport, Douglas and others.[17][18]

Regional Assembly[edit]

Cork City Council has two representatives on the Southern Regional Assembly who are part of the South-West Strategic Planning Area Committee.[19]

Elections[edit]

Members of Cork City Council are elected for a five-year term of office on the electoral system of proportional representation by means of the single transferable vote (PR-STV) from multi-member local electoral areas (LEAs).

Year FF FG SF GP Lab PBP–S SD II WP PDs Ind Total
2024 9 5 4 3 3 1 1 1 0 4 31
2019 8 7 4 4 1 1 0 1 5 31
2014 10 5 8 0 0 3 1 4 31
2009 6 8 4 0 7 1 1 4 31
2004 11 8 2 1 6 1 0 1 1 31
1999 12 8 1 1 5 0 0 2 2 31
1991 9 6 0 1 6 3 3 3 31
1985 13 8 0 0 5 2 3 31

Local Electoral Areas[edit]

Cork is divided into five LEAs, defined by electoral divisions and wards.[20]

LEA Definition Seats
Cork City North-East The electoral divisions of Blackpool A, Blackpool B, Mayfield, Montenotte A, Montenotte B, St. Patrick's A, St. Patrick's B, St. Patrick's C, The Glen A, The Glen B, Tivoli A and Tivoli B as described in the County Borough of Cork (Wards) Regulations 1970[21] and therein referred to as a ward;

in the electoral division of St. Mary's (part);

the townlands of Ballincolly, Ballincrokig and Kilbarry;

and that part of the townland of Ballyvolane that is contained within the electoral division of St. Mary's (part);

and

those parts of the electoral divisions of Caherlag, Rathcooney (Part) and Riverstown that are contained within the City of Cork.

6
Cork City North-West

The electoral divisions of Churchfield, Commons, Fair Hill A, Fair Hill B, Fair Hill C, Farranferris A, Farranferris B, Farranferris C, Gurranebraher A, Gurranebraher B, Gurranebraher C, Gurranebraher D, Gurranebraher E, Knocknaheeny, Shanakiel, Shandon A, Shandon B, Sundays Well A and Sundays Well B as described in the County Borough of Cork (Wards) Regulations 1970 and therein referred to as a ward;

in the electoral division of St. Mary's (part);

the townlands of Ballycannon, Ballygrohan, Ballysheedy, Clogheen, Coolymurraghue, Killard, Killeens, Knocknacullen East, Knocknagorty, Mount Desert;

and those parts of the townlands of Commons, Garranabraher and Knocknacullen West that are contained within the electoral division of St. Mary's (part);

and

those parts of the electoral divisions of Blarney, Carrigrohanebeg, Matehy and Whitechurch that are contained within the City of Cork.

6
Cork City South-Central

The electoral divisions of Ballyphehane A, Ballyphehane B, Centre A, Centre B, City Hall A, Evergreen, Gillabbey A, Gillabbey B, Gillabbey C, Greenmount, Mardyke, Pouladuff A, Pouladuff B, South Gate A, South Gate B, The Lough, Togher B, Tramore A, Tramore B, Tramore C, Turners Cross A, Turners Cross B, Turners Cross C and Turners Cross D as described in the County Borough of Cork (Wards) Regulations 1970 and therein referred to as a ward;

in the electoral division of Lehenagh;

the townlands of Ballycurreen, Curraghconway, Grange and Inchisarsfield;

and

in the electoral division of Douglas; the townlands of Ballinvuskig, Rathmacullig East and Rathmacullig West.

6
Cork City South-East

The electoral divisions of Ballinlough A, Ballinlough B, Ballinlough C, Browningstown, City Hall B, Knockrea A, Knockrea B, Mahon A, Mahon B, and Mahon C as set out in the County Borough of Cork (Wards) Regulations 1970 and therein referred to as a ward;

in the electoral division of Douglas;

the townlands of Ardarrig, Ballinimlagh Ballybrack, Castletreasure, Douglas, Grange, Hop Island, Knocknamullagh, Maryborough, Moneygurney, Monfieldstown, Mounthovel, Oldcourt, Rochestown;

and that part of the townland of Ballyorban that is contained within the City of Cork;

and

those parts of the electoral divisions of Carrigaline (in the former rural district of Cork) and Monkstown Rural that are contained within the City of Cork.

6
Cork City South-West

The electoral divisions of Bishopstown A, Bishopstown B, Bishopstown C, Bishopstown D, Bishopstown E, Glasheen A, Glasheen B, Glasheen C and Togher A as described in the County Borough of Cork (Wards) Regulations 1970 and therein referred to as a ward;

those parts of the townlands of Ballinaspig More and Inchigaggin that are contained within the electoral division of Bishopstown (part);

in the electoral division of Lehenagh;

the townlands of Ballyduhig North, Gortagoulane, Lehenagh Beg and Lehenagh More;

and

those parts of the electoral divisions of Ballincollig, Ballygarvan, Inishkenny and Ovens that are contained within the City of Cork.

7

Councillors[edit]

The following were elected at the 2024 Cork City Council election.

2024 seats summary[edit]

Party Seats
Fianna Fáil 9
Fine Gael 5
Sinn Féin 4
Green 3
Labour 3
Independent Ireland 1
PBP–Solidarity 1
Social Democrats 1
Independent 4

Councillors by electoral area[edit]

This list reflects the order in which councillors were elected on 7 June 2024.[22]

Council members from 2024 election
Local electoral area Name Party
Cork City North East Kenneth O'Flynn Independent Ireland
John Maher Labour
Margaret McDonnell Fianna Fáil
Joe Kavanagh Fine Gael
Ted Tynan Independent
Oliver Moran Green
Cork City North West Tony Fitzgerald Fianna Fáil
Damian Boylan Fine Gael
John Sheehan Fianna Fáil
Kenneth Collins Sinn Féin
Michelle Gould Sinn Féin
Brian McCarthy PBP–Solidarity
Cork City South Central Shane O'Callaghan Fine Gael
Seán Martin Fianna Fáil
Pádraig Rice Social Democrats
Dan Boyle Green
Paudie Dineen Independent
Fiona Kerins Sinn Féin
Cork City South East Terry Shannon Fianna Fáil
Kieran McCarthy Independent
Mary Rose Desmond Fianna Fáil
Des Cahill Fine Gael
Peter Horgan Labour
Honore Kamegni Green
Cork City South West Fergal Dennehy Fianna Fáil
Colm Kelleher Fianna Fáil
Garret Kelleher Fine Gael
Joe Lynch Sinn Féin
Laura Harmon Labour
Terry Coleman Fianna Fáil
Albert Deasy Independent

References[edit]

  1. ^ statiō bene fīdā carīnīs: literally "a good trust-station for keels", adapted by inversion from Virgil's Aeneid (II, 23: statio male fida carinis, "an unsafe harbour"). Sometimes corrupted to "fide".
  2. ^ "Cork City Coat of Arms". Cork City Council. Archived from the original on 15 September 2015. Retrieved 21 February 2016.
  3. ^ "Council Services". Cork City Council. Archived from the original on 1 October 2020. Retrieved 10 October 2020.
  4. ^ "History and Legislation". Cork City Council. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  5. ^ Local Government Provisional Order Confirmation Act 1955 (No. 1P of 1955). Enacted on 16 March 1955. Act of the Oireachtas. Retrieved from Irish Statute Book on 3 January 2022.
  6. ^ Local Government Provisional Order Confirmation Act 1965 (No. 2P of 1965). Enacted on 29 June 1965. Act of the Oireachtas. Retrieved from Irish Statute Book on 3 January 2022.
  7. ^ Local Government Act 2019 (Transfer Day) Order 2019 (S.I. No. 25 of 2019). Signed on 30 January 2019. Statutory Instrument of the Government of Ireland. Archived from the original on 8 February 2020. Retrieved from Irish Statute Book on 17 March 2019.
  8. ^ Local Government Act 2019 (No. 1 of 2019). Enacted on 25 January 2019. Act of the Oireachtas. Archived from the original on 8 July 2019. Retrieved from Irish Statute Book on 17 March 2019.
  9. ^ Cork Local Government Committee (September 2015). "Local Government Arrangements in Cork" (PDF). Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government. Archived (PDF) from the original on 1 August 2017. Retrieved 8 September 2015.
  10. ^ "Merger of Cork councils to be in place for 2019 elections". Evening Echo. 7 September 2015. Archived from the original on 10 October 2015. Retrieved 8 September 2015.
  11. ^ "Cork city to double in size taking in Ballincollig, Blarney and Carrigtwohill". 9 June 2017. Archived from the original on 30 July 2017. Retrieved 29 July 2017.
  12. ^ a b c Riegel, Ralph (9 June 2017). "How Cork's 'super council' has been dismissed - and the city is getting a border extension". Irish Independent. Archived from the original on 9 June 2017. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  13. ^ English, Eoin (9 June 2017). "Cork council merger plans to be axed but extension of city boundary recommended". Irish Examiner. Archived from the original on 9 June 2017. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  14. ^ Expert Advisory Group on Local Government Arrangements in Cork 2017, §§9.11,13.2
  15. ^ English, Eoin (13 June 2017). "Cork City councillors accept boundary extension findings". Irish Examiner. Archived from the original on 13 June 2017. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  16. ^ Roche, Barry (15 July 2017). "Cork City Council needs 'extended boundary' to tackle housing crisis". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 29 July 2017. Retrieved 16 July 2017.
  17. ^ "County Hall spends more than €30,000 on legal advice on boundary changes". Evening Echo. 6 June 2018. Archived from the original on 12 June 2018. Retrieved 7 June 2018.
  18. ^ "Boundary increase for Cork City Council approved by Cabinet". The Irish Times. 6 June 2018. Archived from the original on 16 November 2018. Retrieved 7 June 2018.
  19. ^ Local Government Act 1991 (Regional Assemblies) (Establishment) Order 2014, Article 5 and Schedule 3 (S.I. No. 573 of 2014). Signed on 16 December 2014. Statutory Instrument of the Government of Ireland. Retrieved from Irish Statute Book on 4 May 2023.
  20. ^ City Of Cork Local Electoral Areas Order 2019 (S.I. No. 27 of 2019). Signed on 31 January 2019. Statutory Instrument of the Government of Ireland. Archived from the original on 11 September 2020. Retrieved from Irish Statute Book on 19 March 2019.
  21. ^ County Borough of Cork (Wards) Regulations 1970 (S.I. No. 246 of 1970). Signed on 22 October 1970. Statutory Instrument of the Government of Ireland. Retrieved from Irish Statute Book on 4 May 2023.
  22. ^ "Cork City Council – Elected Candidates". RTÉ News. Retrieved 17 June 2024.

External links[edit]