Corymbia tessellaris

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Corymbia tessellaris
Corymbia tesselaris 2.jpg
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Corymbia
Species: C. tessellaris
Binomial name
Corymbia tessellaris
K.D.Hill & L.A.S.Johnson
Synonyms
  • Eucalyptus tessellaris (F.Muell.) K.D.Hill & L.A.S.Johnson
  • Eucalyptus viminalis Hook.
  • Eucalyptus papuana var. aparrerinja Blakely

Corymbia tessellaris (syn. Eucalyptus tessellaris), the carbeen, Moreton Bay ash, black butt, is a Ghost gum tree ranging from small to 35 m. tall, forming a lignotuber. Bark rough on lower 1–4 m of trunk, tessellated, dark grey to black, abruptly changing to white-cream smooth bark above that is sometimes powdery. Name from Latin: tessellaris - tessellated, referring to the rough bark in small squares.

Range[edit]

Northeastern Australia from north and northwest of Narrabri (30° S), N.S.W., and eastern Queensland from Charleville to the tip of Cape York Peninsula where a tree of this species is the northernmost eucalypt on the Australian mainland. Also found on some of the Torres Strait Islands and southern New Guinea.[1] Found on plains and rolling terrain on a wide variety of soils including swampy clayey types.

Description[edit]

Noted for its distinctive stocking of tessellated or "crocodile scale" bark over the lower part of the trunk abruptly changing to smooth white above. It has a compound axillary inflorescences with an expanded rhachis, thin-walled fruit and a crown of fully adult lanceolate smooth leaves about 15 cm long and 1 cm wide.[2]

The trunk is almost always straight making up a half to two thirds of the total tree height, with a crown of slender branches with pendulous smaller branchlets.[3]

Fruit 8–11 mm long, 6–8 mm diameter, cylindrical or ovoid (occasionally somewhat urceolate), more or less striate; disc depressed; valves enclosed.[4]

Withstands strong winds, heat and drought and tolerates a moderate amount of salt spray. Propagates from seed. Flowering midwinter to early summer.[5]

The wood is heavy and has been used for bridge construction and making spears. The tree produces many organic compounds with industrial potential including pinenes, aromadendrene, limonene and globulol.[6]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ [3]
  4. ^ [4]
  5. ^ [5]
  6. ^ Beasley (2009), p. 25.

References[edit]

External links[edit]