Corythoichthys flavofasciatus

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Corythoichthys flavofasciatus
Al-Qusair 13 April 2008 - 042.jpg
Al Qusair, Egypt
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Syngnathiformes
Family: Syngnathidae
Genus: Corythoichthys
Species:
C. flavofasciatus
Binomial name
Corythoichthys flavofasciatus
(Rüppell, 1838)
Synonyms[2]
  • Syngnathus flavofasciatus Rüppell, 1838
  • Corythoichthys fasciatus (Gray, 1830)
  • Corythoichthys sealei Jordan & Starks, 1906
  • Corythoichthys serrulifer Fowler, 1938

Corythoichthys flavofasciatus, known commonly as the network pipefish, reticulate pipefish and yellow-banded pipefish, is a species of marine fish in the family Syngnathidae.

Corythoichthys flavofasciatus, Egypt

Distribution and habitat[edit]

This species can be found from the Red Sea [3] and Eastern Africa [4][5] to the Tuamotu, the Ryukyu Islands, northern Australia and the Austral Islands.[2] It lives in tropical climate and it is associated with lagoons and coral reefs at depths from the low tide line to 25 m.[2][6]

Description[edit]

Corythoichthys flavofasciatus can reach a length of about 12 centimetres (4.7 in) in males. These fishes have 26-36 dorsal soft rays.[2] Body has yellow and brown stripes, while the snout is red. Males develop orange stripes and brilliant light blue spots. This species is quite similar to Corythoichthys conspicillatus.

Biology[edit]

This species is ovoviviparous. These fishes are probably monogamous and are usually found in pairs.[2][6] The male carries the eggs in a ventral pouch, which is below the tail.[2][7] Hatching time usually lasts 10–12 days. These fishes feed on small invertebrates especially copepods, but also small isopods and ostracods.[2] In French Polynesia it is predated by Epinephelus merra.

Taxonomy[edit]

Some authorities consider that Corythoichthys flavofasciatus is a species which is restricted to the Red Sea and that the species found in the remainder of the Indo-Pacific is Corythoichthys conspicillatus.[8] [2]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Fenner, Robert M.: The Conscientious Marine Aquarist. Neptune City,: T.F.H. Publications, 2001.
  • Helfman, G., B. Collette y D. Facey: The diversity of fishes. Blackwell Science, Malden, Massachusetts, 1997.
  • Hoese, D.F. 1986:. A M.M. Smith y P.C. Heemstra (eds.) Smiths' sea fishes. Springer-Verlag, Berlin.
  • Moyle, P. and J. Cech.: Fishes: An Introduction to Ichthyology, 4th. ed., Upper Saddle River, New jersey: Prentice-Hall.
  • Nelson, J.: Fishes of the World, 3rd. ed. New York: John Wiley and Sons..
  • Wheeler, A.: The World Encyclopedia of Fishes, 2nd. Ed. London: Macdonald.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pollom, R. (2017). "Corythoichthys flavofasciatus". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2017: e.T65364818A67619390. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-3.RLTS.T65364818A67619390.en.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2018). "Corythoichthys flavofasciatus" in FishBase. February 2018 version.
  3. ^ Khalaf, M.A. A.M. Disi, 1997. Fishes of the Gulf of Aqaba. Marine Science Station, Aqaba, Jordania. 252 p.
  4. ^ Garpe, KC y M.C. Öhman, 2003. Coral and fish distribution patterns in Mafia Island Marine Park, Tanzania: fish-habitado interactions. Hydrobiologia 498: 191-211.
  5. ^ Fricke, R., 1999. Fishes of the Mascarene Islands (Réunion, Mauricio, Rodriguez): an Annotated checklist, with descriptions of new species. Koeltz Scientific Books, Koenigstein, Theses Zoologicae, Vol.. 31: 759 p.
  6. ^ a b Australian Government – Department of Environment and Energy
  7. ^ Breder, C.M. i D.E. Rosen, 1966. Modes of reproduction in fishes. T.F.H. Publications, Neptune City. 941 p.
  8. ^ Thompson, Vanessa J. & Dianne J. Bray. "Corythoichthys conspicillatus". Fishes of Australia. Museums Victoria. Retrieved 27 May 2018.

External links[edit]