Cossack songs

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Zaporozhshiy kazak by Konsyantin Makovskiy (1884)

Cossack songs are folk songs which were created by the Cossacks of the Russian Empire. Cossack songs were influenced by Russian and Ukrainian folk songs, North Caucasian music, as well as original works by Russian composers.

Cossack songs are divided into several subgroups including Don, Terek, Ural, etc.

Dnipropetrovsk[edit]

Cossack’s songs of Dnipropetrovsk Region
CountryUkraine
Domainsperforming arts
Reference01194
RegionEurope and North America
Inscription history
Inscription2016 (11.COM session)
«Mykluho Maklay» — «Ой з-за гори, да ще й з-за лиману»

Dnipropetrovsk's Cossack songs (Ukrainian:Козацькі пісні Дніпропетровщини [uk]) describe Zaporozhian Cossacks songs in the Dnipropetrovsk region, listed as an intangible cultural heritage in need of urgent protection.[1][2][3] Cossack songs traditionally involve male singing.[4] Cossack songs are nowadays often performed by women, but rarely in mixed groups.

List of Intangible Cultural Heritage[edit]

2014 in Dnepropetrovsk region began the initiative group of nomination dossier for inclusion Cossack songs end to the UNESCO list of security. On November 28, 2016, the Committee for the Protection of Intangible Cultural Heritage List included Cossack songs of the Dnipropetrovsk region on the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in need of urgent protection. According to the Committee, these works, sung by Cossack communities in the region, talk about the tragedy of war and the personal experiences of soldiers. The lyrics maintain spiritual ties with the past, but are also entertaining.[1]

«Oy na hori ta y zhentsi zhnut'». Amvrosiy Zhdakha 1911—1914 years
«Oy, ty, divchyno, moya ty zore». Amvrosiy Zhdakha 1911—1914 years
«Oy, vida chayci-chayci». Amvrosiy Zhdakha 1911—1914 years
«Oy, u poli mohyla». Amvrosiy Zhdakha 1911—1914 years
«U dibrovi chorna halka». Amvrosiy Zhdakha 1911—1914 years

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