Cottage pudding

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Cottage pudding
TypePudding
CourseDessert
Place of originUnited States
Main ingredientsCake, glaze or custard

Cottage pudding is a traditional American dessert consisting of a plain, dense cake served with a sweet glaze or custard. The glaze is generally cornstarch based and flavored with sugar, vanilla, chocolate, butterscotch, or one of a variety of fruit flavors such as lemon or strawberry.

History[edit]

One typical recipe is from Recipes Tried and True, a collection of recipes compiled in 1894 by the Ladies' Aid Society of the First Presbyterian Church in Marion, Ohio.[1]

Cottage pudding can be baked over a fruit base, with a Cottage Pudding recipe from ”Fanny Farmer”resulting dessert similar to a fruit cobbler, as in the recipe for Apple Pan Dowdy in The Fannie Farmer Cookbook.[2]

Description[edit]

Cottage pudding is a simple single layer butter cake served with some kind of sauce poured over it.[3] The sauce could be custard, hard sauce, butterscotch, chocolate sauce, whipped cream, or crushed fruits.

There are many variations on the simple recipe. The traditional preparation is served as a one layer cake topped with fruit or custard, but the same batter can also be used for layer cakes, like banana layer cakes, which are filled with a layer of custard and sliced bananas, or as a substitute for sponge cake in traditional layer cake "pies" like the Washington pie or Boston cream pie, and other desserts like peach melba and baked Alaska.[4] It could also be used to make ice cream sandwiches.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ womenshistory.about.com
  2. ^ "The Fannie Farmer Cookbook", 11th Edition, published by Little, Brown and Company, original copyright 1896 by Fannie Merritt Farmer.
  3. ^ "Cottage Pudding recipe from "Fanny Farmer"". Monterey Herald.
  4. ^ Making a cake in a jiffy
  5. ^ Cottage Pudding Proves Equally at Home in an Apartment or Fine Mansion, Detroit Free Press, Detroit, Michigan. 13 Feb 1934, Page 10,