Cottonwood, Idaho

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Cottonwood, Idaho
Lunch in Cottonwood, Idaho (5947364833).jpg
Location of Cottonwood in Idaho County, Idaho.
Location of Cottonwood in Idaho County, Idaho.
Coordinates: 46°3′8″N 116°21′2″W / 46.05222°N 116.35056°W / 46.05222; -116.35056Coordinates: 46°3′8″N 116°21′2″W / 46.05222°N 116.35056°W / 46.05222; -116.35056
CountryUnited States
StateIdaho
CountyIdaho
Area
 • Total0.84 sq mi (2.17 km2)
 • Land0.84 sq mi (2.17 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
3,497 ft (1,066 m)
Population
 • Total900
 • Estimate 
(2019)[3]
940
 • Density1,120.38/sq mi (432.45/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (Pacific (PST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (PDT)
ZIP codes
83522
Area code(s)208
FIPS code16-18640
GNIS feature ID0372152

Cottonwood is a city in Idaho County, Idaho. On the Camas Prairie in north central Idaho, the population was 900 at the 2010 census, down from 944 in 2000. It is just west of U.S. Route 95, between Grangeville and Lewiston.

Origins

Cottonwood began in 1862 as a series of way station shelters for prospectors and mining suppliers on their way south to Florence and Warrens. It was named for the dense growth of trees that formerly lined Cottonwood Creek.[4]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910555
19206109.9%
1930519−14.9%
194067329.7%
19506892.4%
19601,08156.9%
1970867−19.8%
19809418.5%
1990822−12.6%
200094414.8%
2010900−4.7%
2019 (est.)940[3]4.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 900 people, 363 households, and 240 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,071.4 inhabitants per square mile (413.7/km2). There were 392 housing units at an average density of 466.7 per square mile (180.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.1% White, 0.9% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.4% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.9% of the population.

There were 363 households, of which 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.9% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.9% were non-families. 28.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 17.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.05.

The median age in the city was 43.2 years. 26.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 18.6% were from 25 to 44; 29% were from 45 to 64; and 18.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.1% male and 51.9% female.

2000 census

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 944 people, 364 households, and 242 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,136.4 people per square mile (439.1/km2). There were 398 housing units at an average density of 479.1 per square mile (185.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.99% White, 0.64% Native American, 0.42% Asian, and 0.95% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.42% of the population.

There were 364 households, out of which 34.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.5% were non-families. 28.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 29.7% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,167, and the median income for a family was $39,625. Males had a median income of $30,833 versus $20,833 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,003. About 5.8% of families and 10.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.7% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.

Geography

The Dog Bark Park Inn, a dog-shaped hotel room in Cottonwood

Cottonwood is located at 46°3′8″N 116°21′2″W / 46.05222°N 116.35056°W / 46.05222; -116.35056 (46.0522, -116.3506).[7] at an elevation of 3,500 feet (1,070 m) above sea level.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.84 square miles (2.18 km2), all of it land.[8]

Cottonwood is home to the Dog Bark Park Inn, a hotel in the shape of a beagle.

Climate

The climate in this area has mild differences between highs and lows, and there is adequate rainfall year-round. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Cottonwood has a marine west coast climate, abbreviated "Cfb" on climate maps.[9]

Climate data for Cottonwood (1950-2011)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 56
(13)
64
(18)
72
(22)
83
(28)
86
(30)
92
(33)
99
(37)
98
(37)
94
(34)
87
(31)
68
(20)
58
(14)
99
(37)
Average high °F (°C) 35.6
(2.0)
39.7
(4.3)
46.8
(8.2)
54.2
(12.3)
61.6
(16.4)
69.2
(20.7)
78.9
(26.1)
79.6
(26.4)
70.5
(21.4)
57.3
(14.1)
42.3
(5.7)
35.1
(1.7)
55.9
(13.3)
Average low °F (°C) 23.5
(−4.7)
26
(−3)
30.1
(−1.1)
35
(2)
41.4
(5.2)
47.9
(8.8)
55
(13)
54.7
(12.6)
47.6
(8.7)
38.2
(3.4)
29
(−2)
23.1
(−4.9)
37.6
(3.1)
Record low °F (°C) −11
(−24)
−20
(−29)
4
(−16)
18
(−8)
24
(−4)
32
(0)
31
(−1)
32
(0)
25
(−4)
9
(−13)
−5
(−21)
−18
(−28)
−20
(−29)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 1.81
(46)
1.41
(36)
1.88
(48)
2.31
(59)
3.06
(78)
2.56
(65)
1.35
(34)
1.19
(30)
1.18
(30)
1.49
(38)
2.12
(54)
1.77
(45)
22.12
(562)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 13.5
(34)
4.7
(12)
6.4
(16)
2.4
(6.1)
0.2
(0.51)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.2
(0.51)
4.2
(11)
14
(36)
45.6
(116)
Average precipitation days 12 10 13 13 15 12 6 6 6 9 13 12 127
Source: WRCC[10]

Transportation

Highways

The city is just west of U.S. Route 95, the state's main north-south highway, which formerly went through central Cottonwood. It was re-routed in 1976 with the completion of the new bypass, east of the city.[11]

Railroad

The city is the southern terminus of the BG&CM Railroad, a freight line with a northern terminus at Spalding. It runs on the former tracks of the Camas Prairie Railroad, whose second subdivision line continued to Fenn and Grangeville. The last run to Fenn and Grangeville was on November 29, 2000,[12][13] and those tracks were removed by mid-2003.[14][15]

Education

The Cottonwood Joint School District #242 operates the public schools, led by Prairie Junior/Senior High School in Cottonwood.[16] Summit Academy, a Catholic K-12 School, provides a classical Catholic Education.

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  4. ^ "Cottonwood, once a miner's stop, is now a farming, cattle center". Lewiston Morning Tribune. October 6, 1955. p. 8.
  5. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  6. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-02. Retrieved 2012-12-18.
  9. ^ Climate Summary for Cottonwood, Idaho
  10. ^ "COTTONWOOD 2 WSW, ID (102159)". Western Regional Climate Center. Retrieved November 26, 2015.
  11. ^ "Cottonwood bypass open to U.S. traffic". Lewiston Morning Tribune. July 13, 1976. p. 7A.
  12. ^ "Camas Prairie dream out of steam". Moscow-Pullman Daily News. Associated Press. November 30, 2000. p. 2A.
  13. ^ Walker, Jodi (December 31, 2000). "Some cracks in the foundation: Last train to Grangeville". Lewiston Morning Tribune. p. 3A.
  14. ^ Williams, Elaine (February 17, 2004). "Railroad changing hands". Lewiston Morning Tribune. p. 1A.
  15. ^ Williams, Elaine (March 4, 2004). "Railroad changes hands, trains keep on running". Lewiston Morning Tribune. p. 6A.
  16. ^ "Prairie Junior/Senior High School". Cottonwood Joint School District #242. Archived from the original on May 3, 2009. Retrieved November 28, 2012.

External links