Coverdale–Page

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Coverdale–Page
A road sign indicating a merge
Studio album by
Released18 March 1993 (Japan)
Recorded1991–92
StudioLittle Mountain Studios in Vancouver; Criteria Studios in Miami, Florida; Abbey Road Studios in London and Highbrow Productions in Hook City, Nevada
GenreBlues rock, hard rock, heavy metal
Length61:05
LabelGeffen (Americas/East Asia)
EMI (Europe)
Sony (Japan)
Producer

Coverdale–Page (styled as Coverdale • Page) is the only studio album by Whitesnake lead vocalist David Coverdale and former Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page (in a collaboration known as Coverdale–Page), released by Geffen Records in North America and EMI internationally, on 15 March 1993. The album was recorded at Little Mountain Sound Studios in Vancouver, Criteria Studios in Miami, Granny's House in Reno, Nevada and Abbey Road Studios, London. Recording commenced in the fall of 1991 and concluded in early 1992. It was produced by Page, Coverdale and Canadian record producer, Mike Fraser.[1]

According to Coverdale, the traffic sign shown on the cover of the album signified "two roads joining to one road. Try to express unification or joining together."[2]

Coverdale–Page reached No. 4 in the UK and No. 5 on the US Billboard 200 chart, while the first single released, "Pride and Joy", although barely making a dent on the pop charts, reached the No. 1 spot on the Album Rock Tracks chart for six weeks.[3] The album was certified Gold by the RIAA for sales of the LP, CD and Cassette in excess of 500,000 copies[4] and eventually went Platinum.[5] It also received the official Japanese Sony Music in-house award for sales in excess of 150,000 copies in Japan[6] as well as the EMI in-house sales award for sales in excess of 60,000 copies in the UK.[7]

Background[edit]

The project commenced in 1991 at the suggestion of American A&R executive John Kalodner, as both artists were signed to Geffen Records at the time in North America. The two had met at least once before, at Castle Donington's 1990 Monsters of Rock festival, which Whitesnake headlined. Aerosmith were second on the bill and Page guested on their encore, "Train Kept A-Rollin'".

Prior to the formation of the duo, Page's former Led Zeppelin bandmate Robert Plant had been reluctant to reunite with Page.[8] In interviews at the time, Plant expressed some derision at the guitarist's collaboration with Coverdale, referring to the project as "David Cover-version".[9][10]

"David was really good to work with," Page noted. "It was very short-lived, but I enjoyed working with him, believe it or not."[11]

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic4/5 stars[12]

Sales were respectable, especially in the UK and US, where the album went top 5. Critical reviews were also favourable, with Rolling Stone stating that "it may not be the second coming of Led Zeppelin, but it's close enough that only the most curmudgeonly would deny the band its due... Coverdale's bluesy howl has never been put to better use than against Page's guitar." Q magazine went further saying, "Excellent... this album screams classic from start to finish."[13]

Legacy[edit]

The following review from RIP magazine, "Robert Plant is going to be seriously pissed when he hears this [album]",[14] and the poor reception and sales of Plant's album Fate of Nations, released around the same time, was apparently the catalyst for Page and Plant reuniting for an MTV Special, two albums and a tour.[citation needed]

In a March 2018 interview (which happens to be the 25th anniversary release of the album), on Eddie Trunk's SiriusXM radio show, Coverdale revealed plans to release a remastered box set version, with the possible inclusion of four or five previously unreleased tracks, that were written and recorded for the album, but didn't make the final cut.[15]

On 25 June 2019, The New York Times Magazine listed Coverdale–Page among hundreds of artists whose material was reportedly destroyed in the 2008 Universal fire.[16]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks are written by David Coverdale and Jimmy Page.

No.TitleLength
1."Shake My Tree"4:54
2."Waiting on You"5:16
3."Take Me for a Little While"6:17
4."Pride and Joy"3:32
5."Over Now"5:24
6."Feeling Hot"4:11
7."Easy Does It"5:53
8."Take a Look at Yourself"5:02
9."Don't Leave Me This Way"7:53
10."Absolution Blues"6:00
11."Whisper a Prayer for the Dying"6:54

Personnel[edit]

Additional musicians[edit]

Technical[edit]

  • Michael Fraser – producer, engineer, mixing
  • Michael McIntyre – engineer, production co-ordination
  • Keith Rose – assistant engineer
  • Delwyn Brooks – assistant engineer
  • Chris Brown – assistant engineer
  • George Marino – mastering
  • Hugh Syme – art direction, design

Production[edit]

  • Michael McIntyre
  • Tommy McIntyre
  • Robert DeBell

Charts[edit]

Chart (1993) Peak Position
Norwegian Albums Chart[17] 11
UK Albums Chart [3] 4
US Billboard The 200 Albums Chart[18] 5
Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart[19] 5
Swedish Albums Chart[20] 8
Swiss Albums Chart[21] 16
Australian ARIA Top 50 Albums Chart[22] 25
German Albums Chart[23] 27
Dutch Albums Chart[24] 55

Singles[edit]

Year Single Chart Position
1993 "Pride and Joy" US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks Chart[25] 1
Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart[26] 50
"Shake My Tree" US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks Chart[27] 3
Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart[28] 81
"Take Me for a Little While" UK Singles Chart[3] 29
US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks Chart[29] 15
Canadian RPM Top 100 Chart[30] 77
US Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles Chart[31] 15
"Over Now" US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks Chart[citation needed] 24
"Take a Look at Yourself" UK Singles Chart[3] 43

Certifications[edit]

Country Sales Certification
Canada (CRIA) 100,000+ Platinum[32]
United States (RIAA) 1,000,000+ Platinum[33]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Coverdale-Page debut album". Classic Rock Review. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  2. ^ Led-Zeppelin.org. "Led Zeppelin Assorted Info". Archived from the original on 14 May 2012.
  3. ^ a b c d "Coverdale Page – Full Official Chart History". Official Charts Company. Official Charts Company. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  4. ^ "Coverdale Page Coverdale Page USA AWARD DISC (406281)". Eil.com. Retrieved 9 October 2011.
  5. ^ Prato, Greg. "Coverdale/Page Biography". Yahoo. Retrieved 25 July 2011.
  6. ^ "Coverdale Page Coverdale Page Japan AWARD DISC (406354)". Eil.com. 20 June 2007. Retrieved 9 October 2011.
  7. ^ "Coverdale Page Coverdale Page UK IN-HOUSE AWARD DISC (406343)". Eil.com. 20 June 2007. Retrieved 9 October 2011.
  8. ^ Prato, Greg. "Coverdale/Page". Vh1. Retrieved 27 June 2009.
  9. ^ "David Coverdale Hopes to End Fight With Robert Plant". Michael Gallucci. 15 June 2013. Retrieved 4 December 2015.
  10. ^ Led-Zeppelin.org. "Led Zeppelin Assorted Info". Archived from the original on 16 February 2012.
  11. ^ Murray, Charles Shaar (August 2004). "The Guv'nors". Mojo. No. 129. p. 75.
  12. ^ "Coverdale/Page - Coverdale/Page, David Coverdale, Jimmy Page | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 15 November 2018. Retrieved 15 November 2018.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  14. ^ "Coverdale and Page - Coverdale/Page (album review )". Sputnikmusic.com. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  15. ^ Lifton, Dave. "David Coverdale Hints at 'Coverdale/Page' Box Set". Ultimate Classic Rock.
  16. ^ Rosen, Jody (25 June 2019). "Here Are Hundreds More Artists Whose Tapes Were Destroyed in the UMG Fire". The New York Times. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  17. ^ "Top 100 Albums – 21 March 1993". norwegiancharts.com. Archived from the original on 6 November 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2009.
  18. ^ "The Billboard 200 – 3 April 1993". Billboard. Archived from the original on 3 July 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2009.
  19. ^ "RPM Albums Chart – 3 April 1993". RPM. Archived from the original on 6 October 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2009.
  20. ^ "Top 60 Albums – 7 April 1993". swedishcharts.com. Archived from the original on 6 November 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2009.
  21. ^ "Top 100 Albums – 11 April 1993". hitparade.ch. Archived from the original on 10 November 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2009.
  22. ^ "Top 50 Albums – 11 April 1993". ARIA. Archived from the original on 5 November 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2009.
  23. ^ "Top 100 Albums – 12 April 1993". musicline.de. Retrieved 19 January 2009.[permanent dead link]
  24. ^ "Top 100 Albums – 24 April 1993". dutchcharts.nl. Archived from the original on 7 November 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2009.
  25. ^ "Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks – 27 February 1993". Billboard. Retrieved 15 January 2009.
  26. ^ "RPM Singles Chart – 10 April 1993". RPM. Archived from the original on 6 October 2012. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  27. ^ "Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks – 8 May 1993". Billboard. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  28. ^ "RPM Singles Chart – 5 June 1993". RPM. Archived from the original on 6 October 2012. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  29. ^ "Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks – 17 July 1993". Billboard. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  30. ^ "RPM Singles Chart – 31 July 1993". RPM. Archived from the original on 6 October 2012. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  31. ^ "Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles – 7 August 1993". Billboard. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  32. ^ "CRIA Coverdale Page – 30 March 1993". CRIA. Archived from the original on 26 December 2009. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  33. ^ "RIAA.org Coverdale Page – 7 April 1995". RIAA. Archived from the original on 22 September 2010. Retrieved 19 January 2009.