Covington Catholic High School

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Covington Catholic High School
Address
Covington Catholic High School is located in Kentucky
Covington Catholic High School
Covington Catholic High School
Covington Catholic High School is located in the United States
Covington Catholic High School
Covington Catholic High School

,
41011

United States
Coordinates39°3′58″N 84°31′59″W / 39.06611°N 84.53306°W / 39.06611; -84.53306Coordinates: 39°3′58″N 84°31′59″W / 39.06611°N 84.53306°W / 39.06611; -84.53306
Information
Other names
  • CCH
  • CovCath
TypePrivate school
MottoLatin: Pro Deo et patria
(For God and country)
Religious affiliation(s)Roman Catholic
Established1925 (1925)
Founders
OversightRoman Catholic Diocese of Covington
NCES School ID00515778[1]
PrincipalBob Rowe
ChaplainFr. Michael Hennigen
Teaching staff41.9 (on an FTE basis)[1]
Grades912
GenderBoys
Enrollment603[1] (2015–2016)
Student to teacher ratio14.4[1]
Campus size30 acres (12 ha)
Color(s)Blue and white         
MascotColonel Covington Colonels.png
Team nameColonels
AccreditationSouthern Association of Colleges and Schools[2]
NewspaperThe CCH Times
Website

Covington Catholic High School (abbreviated CCH or CovCath) is a private, all-male high school in Park Hills, Kentucky, United States. It was founded in 1925 by Bishop Francis William Howard and Brother George Sauer and is part of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Covington. The school is the only boys' high school in Northern Kentucky and one of five in the Cincinnati area. The girls' Notre Dame Academy is located across the street.

History[edit]

Early history[edit]

Covington Catholic traces its roots to St. Joseph Commercial School in Covington. In 1885, Bishop Camillus Paul Maes invited three brothers of the Society of Mary of Dayton, Ohio, to run the all-boys parochial school at St. Joseph's Parish on 12th Street. The brothers later established the commercial school to offer vocational education in business. The school graduated classes from 1892 to 1926.[3][4][unreliable source?]

In 1925, responding to Bishop Francis William Howard's call for a four-year Catholic boy's high school in Northern Kentucky, the Marianists opened Covington Catholic High School at Mother of God on West 6th Street, with a freshman class of 32. The commercial school closed the following year as the brothers chose to devote their efforts to the new high school. High school classes were held in the Mother of God School building until a new building could be completed.[5] Covington Catholic graduated its first class of 17 in 1929. The school received accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and the Kentucky Department of Education that year. In its early years, the school's support and students came primarily from parishes in Covington, Fort Mitchell, Fort Wright, and Ludlow.[3][4]

Relocation to Park Hills[edit]

In the early 1950s, it became apparent that Covington Catholic High School would have to be expanded further to accommodate increased demand. Pastors from 13 Northern Kentucky parishes approved plans for construction of a new 44,000-square-foot (4,100 m2) high school building on a 14-acre (5.7 ha) plot in Park Hills, a few miles away from the previous location in Covington. The cornerstone was placed in 1954, and the first class graduated from the school in 1955. The 13 parishes shared the cost of the new school, around $845,000 (equivalent to $6.15 million in 2016).[3][4]

The school gymnasium was dedicated on January 29, 1955, when the Purcell High School Cavaliers played Covington Catholic in basketball.[4] Some Kenton County families sent their children to Newport Catholic High School because Covington Catholic lacked a football program.[6] In 1968, Wooten Field was added for football, and the baseball field was completely rebuilt. A building containing a weight room, locker rooms, showers, and offices was added in 1988 to accommodate the growing needs of athletic teams.[4][6]

Project Team Build[edit]

In 1968, Covington Catholic introduced Project Team Build in response to the financial and staffing challenges that parochial schools were experiencing. The program consisted of modular scheduling, team teaching, independent study, and grading based on self-assessments, with increased participation by parents. Religious education became self-directed with an emphasis on elective courses. An "open campus" policy permitted students to leave the campus when not attending a class. The school was accredited by the Kentucky Department of Education as an experimental school and won recognition for educational innovation.[7][8][9] However, the governing Board of Pastors objected to the open campus policy and religion curriculum. In April 1971, after failed negotiations with the 12-member board, 30 of 46 faculty members resigned, including the principal, Fr. Richard K. Knuge. The Society of Mary permanently withdrew from the school.[3][10][11] Kenneth J. Gross became the first lay principal that year, and the board was reorganized to include parents and laypeople. The open campus policy remained but was limited to seniors in good standing.[12]

Expansion[edit]

On October 29, 2002, construction of the current building began directly behind the original structure. It opened in December 7, 2003, and contains four computer labs. Since the new school has been built, renovations have been made to the football field, baseball complex, and gymnasium.[3][4] Wooten Field was converted to synthetic turf with markings for American football and soccer.[13] In October 2003, Covington Catholic became the first high school in the Cincinnati area to ban tailgate parties at on-campus sporting events.[14]

The campus expanded again in 2010 with the acquisition of 5 acres (2.0 ha) and an adjoining church property with a 20,000-square-foot (1,900 m2) building,[4] now called the Griffin Centre.[13] The school completed the Yung Family Tennis Complex in early 2016 and subsequently opened a new academic building. In August 2017, the school opened a renovated Wooten Field at Dennis Griffin Stadium. The $2.6 million project upgraded the field, stands, and press box and added floodlights for night games.[15]

The campus comprises 30 acres (12 ha).[4] The gymnasium is the only building remaining from when the school moved to Park Hills.[13]

Academics[edit]

As of 2016, a quarter of Covington Catholic's enrolled students take classes in a STEM program that was introduced in 2015 in partnership with Project Lead the Way.[16]

The U.S. Department of Education recognized Covington Catholic as a National Blue Ribbon School for the 2007–08 and 2016–17 school years.[17]

Extracurricular activities[edit]

Athletics[edit]

Covington Catholic athletic teams are known as the Colonels.[15] As of 2018, the Colonels have won 21 Kentucky High School Athletic Association championships. From 1987 to 2015, under athletic director Mike Guidugli, the Colonels won 10 state championships, 21 state runner-up titles, and 130 regional titles. As of 2014, two-thirds of the student body participates in KHSAA-sanctioned sports.[18]

Since its football debut in 1968,[6] the Colonels have been one of three dominant high school football teams in Northern Kentucky, along with Beechwood and Highlands.[19] The Colonels have won seven state championships at the KHSAA Commonwealth Gridiron Bowl, the eighth most in the state. Originally, Covington Catholic was placed in Class 3A for postseason competition; it won the state championship in this class in 1987, 1988, 1993, 1994, 1997, and 2006.[20] In a 2007 statewide realignment of boy's high school football teams, Covington Catholic was placed in Class 5A; as of 2018, they have won one state championship in this class, in 2017.[21] The school's District 5 competitors are Boone County, Conner, Cooper, and Highlands.[22] The Colonels play home games on the school grounds, at Wooten Field at Dennis Griffin Stadium.[15]

The baseball team plays home games at Tom Berger Field.[13] The team has won a single state championship, in 2002.[23]

The swimming and diving teams practice at Silverlake Recreation Center in Erlanger and at Northern Kentucky University.[24] Covington Catholic has won five state championships, in 1962 (in class B), 1974 (tied with Ft. Thomas Highlands in class AA), 1977 and 1978 (in class AA), and 1983.[25]

Covington Catholic fielded its first soccer team in 1977.[26] It won its first state championship in 2005.[27]

The Colonels have also won two KHSAA championship titles in basketball (2014[28] and 2018[29]), two in cross country (1982 and 1994 in class AA),[30] two in golf (1969 and 1984),[31] and one in track and field (2009 in class AA).[32]

Controversy[edit]

Covington Catholic sends students to the anti-abortion March for Life each year; nearly half of the student body attended in 2015.[33] On January 18, 2019, the school attracted attention when viral videos showed Nathan Phillips, a Native American who was participating in an Indigenous Peoples March in Washington, D.C., encountering a group of their students.[34][35][36] The students were visiting the Lincoln Memorial after participating in the Washington March for Life.[34] The students were initially widely condemned on the basis of a short video and reported accounts from Phillips. Longer videos fueled controversy and discussion on what exactly occurred.[37] Several media sources issued retractions, corrections, and apologies.[38][39][40][41]

The school and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Covington initially apologized to Phillips and said that they would further investigate the matter.[42] Bishop Roger Joseph Foys subsequently apologized to the student involved, saying, "We should not have allowed ourselves to be bullied and pressured into making a statement prematurely."[43]

An investigation into the event conducted by Greater Cincinnati Investigation, Inc. found no "offensive or racial statements" were made by the Covington Catholic students.[44]

Notable alumni[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Search for Private Schools – School Detail for Covington Catholic High School". National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved 27 January 2019.
  2. ^ SACS-CASI. "SACS-Council on Accreditation and School Improvement". Archived from the original on April 16, 2010. Retrieved June 23, 2009.
  3. ^ a b c d e Schroeder, David E. (2009). "Covington Catholic High School". In Tenkotte, Paul A.; Claypool, James C. The Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky. pp. 239–240. ISBN 978-0-8131-2565-7 – via Issuu.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h "Covington Catholic High School History". Covington Catholic High School. Archived from the original on September 28, 2007. Retrieved March 2, 2007.
  5. ^ "High School To Be Ready in Fall For Catholic Students of Covington, Bishop Says". The Cincinnati Enquirer (Kentucky ed.). June 10, 1926. p. 14 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ a b c Sweeney, Michael R. (2009). "Newport Central Catholic High School". In Tenkotte, Paul A.; Claypool, James C. The Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky. pp. 354–355. ISBN 978-0-8131-2565-7 – via Issuu.
  7. ^ Valentine, Carole (August 18, 1970). "Innovation at CCHS: Mrs. Malony Tells Catholic Women About It". The Cincinnati Enquirer (Kentucky ed.). Covington, Kentucky: Combined Communications. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ Brookshire, Kay (February 14, 1971). "It's What's Happening At Covington Catholic". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Combined Communications. p. 3-K – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ Kuettner, Al (December 2, 1970). "New idea in study: Covington Catholic throws traditional education out". The Cincinnati Post & Times-Star. E. W. Scripps Company. p. 15 – via NewsBank. (Subscription required (help)).
  10. ^ Brookshire, Kay (April 6, 1971). "Marianist Evaluator Commends CCHS Staff". The Cincinnati Enquirer (Kentucky ed.). Covington, Kentucky: Combined Communications. p. 41 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ Kaufman, Ben L. (April 3, 1971). "Covington Teachers Quit Catholic School". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Combined Communications. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ Brookshire, Kay (May 14, 1971). "Layman New Principal of 'Covington Catholic'". The Cincinnati Enqurier (Kentucky ed.). Covington, Kentucky: Combined Communications. p. 24 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ a b c d "Our Campus". Covington Catholic High School. Archived from the original on June 8, 2017.
  14. ^ Eigelbach, Kevin (October 30, 2003). "CovCath tailgating ban is 'preemptive'". The Cincinnati Post. E. W. Scripps Company. p. A1 – via NewsBank. (Subscription required (help)). Covington Catholic High School has a new principal, a new building, a brand-new parking lot and now a new policy against tailgate parties before Colonels football games and other sporting events. It may be a first in Greater Cincinnati, where the trend has been toward more tailgating rather than less.
  15. ^ a b c Weber, James (August 14, 2017). "After 50 years of football, CovCath debuts stadium lights". The Community Recorder. Fort Mitchell, Kentucky: Gannett Company. p. 1B. Retrieved January 21, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ Mayhew, Chris (February 4, 2016). "CovCath engineers a passion for robotics". Campbell Community Recorder. Fort Thomas, Kentucky: Gannett Company. p. 5A – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Blue Ribbon Schools Program: Schools Recognized, 1982 Through 2018" (PDF). United States Department of Education. November 27, 2018. p. 65. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
  18. ^ a b Weber, James (July 23, 2015). "Short Hops". The Community Recorder. Gannett Company. p. 1B – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ Tenkotte, Paul A.; Claypool, James C., eds. (2009). "Football". The Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky. pp. 354–355. ISBN 978-0-8131-2565-7 – via Google Books.
  20. ^ "Football" (PDF). 2017–2018 KHSAA Handbook. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  21. ^ "KHSAA Football Record Book" (PDF). Kentucky High School Athletic Association. July 25, 2018. p. 1.
  22. ^ "Current Alignment of Team – Football – 2019 through 2022 Playing Seasons". Kentucky High School Athletic Association. May 9, 2018. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
  23. ^ "Baseball" (PDF). 2017–2018 KHSAA Handbook. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  24. ^ "CCH Swimming & Diving". Covington Catholic High School. Archived from the original on December 10, 2017.
  25. ^ "Swimming – Boys" (PDF). 2017–2018 KHSAA Handbook. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  26. ^ "John Toebben, coach of NKU soccer team". The Cincinnati Post. E. W. Scripps Company. April 29, 2003. p. A7. Retrieved February 14, 2019. The Fort Wright resident also started the soccer programs at Covington Catholic High School in 1977 and Covington Latin School in 1980.
  27. ^ "Soccer – Boys" (PDF). 2017–2018 KHSAA Handbook. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  28. ^ "Basketball – Boys" (PDF). 2017–2018 KHSAA Handbook. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  29. ^ "KHSAA Boys' Sweet 16® Basketball Record Book" (PDF). Kentucky High School Athletic Association. April 2, 2018. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  30. ^ "Cross Country – Boys" (PDF). 2017–2018 KHSAA Handbook. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  31. ^ "Golf – Boys" (PDF). 2017–2018 KHSAA Handbook. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  32. ^ "Track – Boys" (PDF). 2017–2018 KHSAA Handbook. Kentucky High School Athletic Association. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  33. ^ Van Benschoten, Amanda (January 23, 2015). "Thousands of local students in D.C. for anti-abortion rally". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. p. A20 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ a b Londberg, Max (January 19, 2019). "'Blatant racism': Ky. high school apologizes following backlash after video shows students surrounding indigenous marchers". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  35. ^ Olivo, Antonio; Wootson, Cleve; Heim, Joe (January 19, 2019). "'It was getting ugly': Native American drummer speaks on the MAGA-hat-wearing teens who surrounded him". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 19, 2019 – via MSN.
  36. ^ Mervosh, Sarah (January 19, 2019). "Viral Video Shows Boys in 'Make America Great Again' Hats Surrounding Native Elder". The New York Times. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  37. ^ Mervosh, Sarah; Rueb, Emily S. (January 21, 2019). "Fuller Picture Emerges of Viral Video of Native American Man and Catholic Students". The New York Times. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  38. ^ Levine, Jon (January 21, 2019). "National Review Pulls Article Saying Covington Students 'Might as Well Have Just Spit on the Cross'". TheWrap. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  39. ^ Michael E., Miller (January 22, 2019). "Viral standoff between a tribal elder and a high schooler is more complicated than it first seemed". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  40. ^ Zimmerman, Julie Irwin (January 21, 2019). "I Failed the Covington Catholic Test". The Atlantic. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  41. ^ Bogost, Ian (January 21, 2019). "Stop Trusting Viral Videos". The Atlantic. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  42. ^ Beam, Adam; Melley, Brian (January 20, 2019). "Students in 'MAGA' hats mock Native American after rally". WROC-TV. Associated Press. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  43. ^ Romero, Dennis (January 26, 2018). "Bishop apologizes to teen who faced off with Native American". NBC News.
  44. ^ Stellars, Frances; Williams, Kevin (February 13, 2019). "Investigation finds no evidence of 'racist or offensive statements' by Covington Catholic students during Lincoln Memorial incident". The Washington Post.
  45. ^ Koch, Bill (March 17, 1987). "Despite disadvantages, UC swimmers are top-notch". The Cincinnati Post. E. W. Scripps Company. p. 4C – via NewsBank. (Subscription required (help)). But Frank Busch, in his seventh season as swimming coach at the University of Cincinnati, doesn’t complain about the small Laurence Hall pool he must use. … “We have our work cut out for us right now,” said Busch, a graduate of Covington Catholic High School.
  46. ^ Williams, Jason (January 22, 2019). "Who knew? Trump's top White House attorney is Covington Catholic High School graduate". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  47. ^ Groeschen, Tom (August 20, 2010). "CovCath grad in ArenaBowl". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. p. D5 – via Newspapers.com.
  48. ^ Alumni Us
  49. ^ Tom Ando, 'Awakening the Storm: The Brett Dietz story' ArenaFan June 15, 2007.
  50. ^ Hardin, Marc (February 15, 2015). "CovCath's Meyer breaks 28-year-old record". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. Retrieved February 3, 2019. Now that Meyer has erased Ryan's record, the oldest boys' regional standards belong to two-time Olympic medalist Nate Dusing, who swam for CovCath. Dusing still holds two regional marks, the 100 butterfly and 100 backstroke, both set in 1997.
  51. ^ Schmidt, Neil (2009). "Flesch, Steve". In Tenkotte, Paul A.; Claypool, James C. The Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky. p. 344. ISBN 978-0-8131-2565-7 – via Google Books.
  52. ^ "Future Cat a surefire hit at CovCath". Kentucky. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  53. ^ Eckberg, John (October 5, 2008). "How to get cash in a credit crunch". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. p. G3 – via Newspapers.com. McNay, a native of Edgewood and a 1977 Covington Catholic graduate, says another simple solution is obvious: Sell something.
  54. ^ Bill Cribbs (October 19, 2011). "Kentucky Obituary and Death Notice Archive - Page 43". Genlookups.com. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  55. ^ "The Local Boys: Hometown Players for the Cincinnati Reds - Dan Neville". The River City News. Covington, Kentucky. April 1, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  56. ^ "Neville Wins 10th; Perez Hits 29th HR". The Cincinnati Post & Times-Star. E. W. Scripps Company. July 18, 1964. p. 9 – via NewsBank. (Subscription required (help)).
  57. ^ Tenkotte, Paul A.; Claypool, James C., eds. (2009). "Basketball". The Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky. p. 66. ISBN 978-0-8131-2565-7 – via Google Books.
  58. ^ "Covington Native, NBA All Star Dies". The River City News. 24 December 2014. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  59. ^ Ernst, Ryan (August 18, 2004). "It's not a smooth move". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. p. G6 – via Newspapers.com.

External links[edit]