Craig Fitzhugh

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Craig Fitzhugh
Craig Fitzhugh.jpg
Minority Leader of the Tennessee House of Representatives
Assumed office
January 11, 2011
Preceded by Gary Odom
Member of the Tennessee House of Representatives
from the 82nd district
Assumed office
1995
Preceded by Floyd Crain
Personal details
Born (1950-03-22) March 22, 1950 (age 68)
Brownsville, Tennessee, U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Pamela Fitzhugh
Children 2
Education University of Tennessee (BS, JD)
Website Official website
Military service
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch  United States Air Force
Years of service 1976–1980 (Active)
1980–1988 (Reserve)
Rank US-O3 insignia.svg Captain (Active)
US-O4 insignia.svg Major (Reserve)
Unit Air Force Reserve Command emblem U.S. Air Force Reserve

Calvin "Craig" Fitzhugh (born March 22, 1950) is an American politician. He is a member of the Tennessee House of Representatives, representing the 82nd District, which encompasses all of Crockett, Haywood and Lauderdale counties.[1] He currently serves as the House Minority Leader and is a member of the Democratic Party.

Biography[edit]

Fitzhugh was born in Brownsville, Tennessee, in 1950 and raised in Ripley, Tennessee. He graduated from Ripley High School in 1968, where he played varsity baseball, football, and basketball. He graduated from the University of Tennessee in 1972 with a bachelor's degree in Banking and Finance. While at UT, he was a member of the Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity and played centerfield on the UT Freshman Baseball Team.

Fitzhugh graduated from law school at UT in 1975. He served four years active duty in the Air Force as a Captain in the Judge’s Advocate General Corp., serving at bases in North Carolina and England. In 1980, Fitzhugh returned to practice law in Ripley where he worked until joining the Bank of Ripley in 1992. He currently serves as the Bank of Ripley's CEO.

Fitzhugh has been married to Pam Chism for over 40 years. They have two children and two grandchildren.

Fitzhugh is active in the Tennessee Banker’s Association, where he previously served as Chairman of the statewide organization. He also remains active in the legal community where he was formerly a member of the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility. Recently, Fitzhugh was inducted as a Fellow of the Tennessee Bar Foundation.

An Eagle Scout, Fitzhugh has been an assistant scoutmaster since 1981. He was awarded the Silver Beaver Award and is a Brotherhood Order of the Arrow member and has completed Woodbadge training.

Fitzhugh is a 27-year sponsor of Ducks Unlimited and a former District and Zone Chairman. He is a fourth generation member of First Baptist Church in Ripley, where he serves as a Deacon.[2][self-published source]

In 2010, he was considered for the presidency of the University of Tennessee.[3]

Education[edit]

Fitzhugh graduated from Ripley High School in 1968. He then attended the University of Tennessee where he received a B.A. in Banking and Finance in 1972. He received a Juris Doctor (J.D.) in 1975 from the University of Tennessee School of Law.[4]

Political career[edit]

Fitzhugh was a Municipal Judge for the City of Gates, Tennessee from 1990 to 1992.[4] Fitzhugh was first elected to the Tennessee House in 1994, taking office in 1995. He has served in that position since, representing the 82nd District. Fitzhugh was elected by the Democratic caucus to serve as House Minority Leader in December 2010.[5]

Fitzhugh declined to run for Governor of Tennessee in the 2014 gubernatorial election.[6][7] He is running for Governor in 2018.[8]

Legislation[edit]

On June 4, 2007, Fitzhugh voted in favor for SB 2326 which increased the Cigarette Tax from 20 cents to 60 cents per pack. It passed the Tennessee House of Representatives 59-37.[9]

Following the 2012 meningitis related death of a local university student,[10] Fitzhugh & State Senator Lowe Finney filed the 'Jacob Nunnely Act' which required students living in on-campus housing to be immunized against the disease. The bill passed and was signed into law by Gov. Bill Haslam on June 4, 2013.[10]

Tennessee was previously one of 31 states that allowed a rapist, whose crime resulted in pregnancy, to sue the survivor for custody of said child.[11] In 2015, Fitzhugh introduced HB 554/SB 1121 which sought to terminate the parental rights of a rapist upon conviction for that crime from which a child resulted. The bill passed both the House and Senate unanimously. It was signed into law by Gov. Bill Haslam on April 16, 2015.[12]

Military service[edit]

Fitzhugh served in the United States Air Force from 1976 to 1980 and achieved the rank of Captain. He also served in the United States Air Force Reserve from 1980 to 1988 and achieved the rank of Major.[4]

Electoral history[edit]

Tennessee House of Representatives Election 2016[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Andy Cole 8,213 44.04
Democratic Craig Fitzhugh 10,437 55.96
Tennessee House of Representatives Election 2014[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican No Candidate
Democratic Craig Fitzhugh 7,830 100
Tennessee House of Representatives Election 2012[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Johnny Edwards 8,172 39.97
Democratic Craig Fitzhugh 12,273 60.03
Tennessee House of Representatives Election 2010[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Johnny Edwards 6,680 48.95
Democratic Craig Fitzhugh 6,964 51.05
Tennessee House of Representatives Election 2008[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican No Candidate
Democratic Craig Fitzhugh 13,088 100
Tennessee House of Representatives Election 2006[18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican No Candidate
Democratic Craig Fitzhugh 12,098 100
Tennessee House of Representatives Election 2004[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Dave Dahl 7,693 38.79
Democratic Craig Fitzhugh 12,140 61.21
Tennessee House of Representatives Election 2002[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Dave Dahl 6,003 39.45
Democratic Craig Fitzhugh 8,901 58.49
Independent Richard Rhoads 312 2.05

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.capitol.tn.gov/districtmaps/HouseDist82.pdf
  2. ^ http://craigfitzhugh.com/meet-craig/
  3. ^ "Finalists chosen for UT presidency - News - Oakridger - Oak Ridge, TN". Oakridger. Archived from the original on September 25, 2015. Retrieved 2013-05-22. 
  4. ^ a b c "Craig Fitzhugh" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-08-29. Retrieved 2013-05-22. 
  5. ^ Zelinski, Andrea (2010-12-16). "Fresh Face, New Focus for House Democrats". TNReport. Retrieved 2013-05-22. 
  6. ^ Zelinski, Andrea (2012-12-12). "House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh ponders run in 2014 governor race". Nashville City Paper. Retrieved 2013-05-22. 
  7. ^ Zelinski, Andrea. "Rep. Fitzhugh passes on run for governor". Nashville City Paper. Retrieved 2013-07-25. 
  8. ^ Garrison, Joey (August 6, 2017). "Craig Fitzhugh to run for governor of Tennessee, setting up contested Democratic primary". The Tennessean. Retrieved August 8, 2017. 
  9. ^ "Tennessee SB 2326 - Cigarette Tax Increase - Key Vote - Project Vote Smart". Votesmart.org. Retrieved 2013-05-22. 
  10. ^ a b http://www.stategazette.com/story/1975317.html
  11. ^ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/26/pregnant-rape-abortion_n_2552183.html
  12. ^ https://trackbill.com/bill/TN/109/HB554/child-custody-and-support-as-enacted-eliminates-th
  13. ^ http://elections.tn.gov/results.php
  14. ^ http://tn.gov/sos/election/results/20141104_CountyTotals_01.pdf
  15. ^ http://tn.gov/sos/election/results/2012-11/TNHouseCountyTotals.pdf
  16. ^ http://tn.gov/sos/election/results/2010-11/TNHCounty.pdf
  17. ^ http://www.tn.gov/sos/election/results/2008-11/tnh6799.pdf
  18. ^ http://tn.gov/sos/election/results/2006-11/en7th67-99.pdf
  19. ^ http://www.tn.gov/sos/election/results/2004-11/tnhousecounty.pdf
  20. ^ http://www.tn.gov/sos/election/results/2002-11/tn-house.pdf

External links[edit]

Tennessee House of Representatives
Preceded by
Gary Odom
Minority Leader of the Tennessee House of Representatives
2011–present
Incumbent