Cranbury, New Jersey

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Cranbury, New Jersey
Township of Cranbury
John S. Silvers Mansion, built 1886
John S. Silvers Mansion, built 1886
Map of Cranbury Township in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Cranbury Township in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Cranbury Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Cranbury Township, New Jersey
Cranbury is located in Middlesex County, New Jersey
Cranbury
Cranbury
Location in Middlesex County
Cranbury is located in New Jersey
Cranbury
Cranbury
Location in New Jersey
Cranbury is located in the United States
Cranbury
Cranbury
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°18′48″N 74°31′13″W / 40.31345°N 74.520233°W / 40.31345; -74.520233Coordinates: 40°18′48″N 74°31′13″W / 40.31345°N 74.520233°W / 40.31345; -74.520233[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyMiddlesex
IncorporatedMarch 7, 1872
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorBarbara Rogers (D, term ends December 31, 2022)[3][4]
 • AdministratorDenise Marabello[5]
 • Municipal clerkDebra A. Rubin[6]
Area
 • Total13.43 sq mi (34.79 km2)
 • Land13.28 sq mi (34.40 km2)
 • Water0.15 sq mi (0.39 km2)  1.12%
 • Rank181st of 565 in state
9th of 25 in county[1]
Elevation82 ft (25 m)
Population
 • Total3,857
 • Estimate 
(2019)[12]
4,067
 • Rank417th of 566 in state
24th of 25 in county[13]
 • Density291.2/sq mi (112.4/km2)
  • Rank481st of 566 in state
25th of 25 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Codes
Area code609[16]
FIPS code3402315550[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0882160[1][19]
Websitewww.cranburytownship.org

Cranbury is a township in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. Located within the Raritan Valley region, Cranbury is roughly equidistant between New York City and Philadelphia in the heart of the state. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,857,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 630 (+19.5%) from the 3,227 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 727 (+29.1%) from the 2,500 counted in 1990.[20]

Cranbury, along with the municipalities of Bellmawr, Egg Harbor Township, Montclair, and Woodbridge Township, were among the original five municipalities (of 565 in the state) in New Jersey that had authorized dispensaries for the sale of medical cannabis in their municipality.[21] However, on July 12, 2021, in an ordinance, the township unanimously voted down the allowance of all types of cannabis businesses from operating within the municipality.[22]

History[edit]

A deed for a sale of land and improvements dated March 1, 1698, is the earliest evidence of buildings constructed in present-day Cranbury. A home in Cranbury was used by Alexander Hamilton and the Marquis de Lafayette as a headquarters during the American Revolutionary War, and they were visited by General George Washington on June 26, 1778.[23][24] As part of orders issued during the Presidency of George Washington, maps of Cranbury were made showing the presence of a church, a mill and 25 other buildings. During its earliest years, the location was usually spelled as "Cranberry". Rev. Joseph G. Symmes argued in 1857 that the name was spelled improperly and that the suffix "bury" was more appropriate, leading the name of the community and brook to be changed to "Cranbury" in 1869.[25] The name has been attributed to wild cranberries that grew in the area.[26]

The so-called Hightstown rail accident occurred in or near Cranbury, in 1833. According to John Quincy Adams, who was aboard the train and who wrote in his diary about it, the train was 3 miles (4.8 km) from Hightstown when the disaster struck, putting the accident near what is now Cranbury Station.[27][28] Among the passengers aboard were Tyrone Power and Cornelius Vanderbilt.

Cranbury was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 7, 1872, from portions of both Monroe Township and South Brunswick Township. Portions of the township were taken on April 1, 1919, to form Plainsboro Township.[29]

George Washington's headquarters were located in Cranbury while planning for the Battle of Monmouth, a major turning point during the Revolutionary War.[30]

The township celebrated its tricentennial in 1998.[30]

Updike Parsonage Barn, originally constructed c. 1759, was disassembled, relocated and reconstructed in 2010 at its current location in Barn Park.[31]

Historic district[edit]

Cranbury Historic District
26, 28 North Main Street, Cranbury, NJ.jpg
Historic houses on North Main Street
LocationMain and Prospect streets; Maplewood and Scott avenues; Bunker Hill Road; Symmes Court; Westminster, Park and Wesley places
Area175 acres (71 ha)
Architectural styleBungalow/craftsman, Greek Revival, Vernacular Italianate
NRHP reference No.80002502[32]
NJRHP No.1830[33]
Significant dates
Added to NRHPSeptember 18, 1980
Designated NJRHPAugust 9, 1979

The Cranbury Historic District is a 175-acre (71 ha) historic district encompassing the village of Cranbury along Main and Prospect streets; Maplewood and Scott avenues; Bunker Hill Road; Symmes Court; Westminster, Park and Wesley places. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on September 18, 1980 for its significance in architecture and commerce. The district includes 177 contributing buildings, including the Old Cranbury School, which was added individually to the NRHP in 1971.[34]

Many buildings on Cranbury's Main Street and in the surrounding area date to the 18th or 19th century. The nomination form describes how "Cranbury is the best preserved 19th century village in Middlesex County" and states that "While there are many small mill towns in New Jersey, few are in such an undisturbed environment as that of Cranbury."[25][34] The John S. Silvers Mansion, built 1886, features Queen Anne style architecture.[34] The Elizabeth M. Wagner History Center of the Cranbury Historical and Preservation Society is located in a former gristmiller's house and has a display on Cranberry Mills.[35]

Geography[edit]

Brainerd Lake in the center of the township
Cranbury Township highlighted in Middlesex County

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 13.43 square miles (34.79 km2), including 13.28 square miles (34.40 km2) of land and 0.15 square miles (0.39 km2) of water (1.12%).[1][2]

Cranbury CDP (2010 Census population of 2,181[36]) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within Cranbury Township.[37][38] Despite the match between the name of the Township and the CDP, the two are not one and the same, as was the case for most paired Township / CDP combinations (i.e., a CDP with the same as its parent township) before the 2010 Census, when most such paired CDPs were coextensive with a township of the same name.[37]

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Brain Grove Lake, Cranbury Station, Wescott and Wyckoffs Mills.[39]

The township borders Monroe Township, Plainsboro Township and South Brunswick Township in Middlesex County; and East Windsor Township in Mercer County.[40][41][42]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18801,509
18901,422−5.8%
19001,4280.4%
19101,424−0.3%
19201,083*−23.9%
19301,27818.0%
19401,3425.0%
19501,79733.9%
19602,00111.4%
19702,25312.6%
19801,927−14.5%
19902,50029.7%
20003,22729.1%
20103,85719.5%
2019 (est.)4,067[12][43]5.4%
Population sources:
1880–1920[44] 1880–1890[45]
1890–1910[46] 1910–1930[47]
1930–1990[48] 2000[49][50] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[29]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 3,857 people, 1,320 households, and 1,060 families in the township. The population density was 291.2 per square mile (112.4/km2). There were 1,371 housing units at an average density of 103.5 per square mile (40.0/km2). The racial makeup was 80.53% (3,106) White, 3.45% (133) Black or African American, 0.10% (4) Native American, 13.74% (530) Asian, 0.03% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.36% (14) from other races, and 1.79% (69) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.57% (99) of the population.[9]

Of the 1,320 households, 41.4% had children under the age of 18; 71.3% were married couples living together; 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present and 19.7% were non-families. Of all households, 17.5% were made up of individuals and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.21.[9]

27.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 15.1% from 25 to 44, 35.5% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46.2 years. For every 100 females, the population had 94.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 88.2 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $131,667 (with a margin of error of +/− $21,076) and the median family income was $146,250 (+/− $24,045). Males had a median income of $122,566 (+/− $25,917) versus $60,781 (+/− $22,066) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $55,236 (+/− $5,718). About 3.1% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.2% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.[51]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 3,227 people, 1,091 households, and 877 families residing in the township. The population density was 240.6 people per square mile (92.9/km2). There were 1,121 housing units at an average density of 83.6 per square mile (32.3/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 88.78% White, 2.26% African American, 7.41% Asian, 0.22% from other races, and 1.33% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.70% of the population.[49][50]

There were 1,091 households, out of which 46.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 74.6% were married couples living together, 4.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.6% were non-families. 16.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.31.[49][50]

In the township the population was spread out, with 30.4% under the age of 18, 3.4% from 18 to 24, 27.6% from 25 to 44, 27.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.4 males.[49][50]

The median income for a household in the township was $111,680, and the median income for a family was $128,410. Males had a median income of $94,683 versus $44,167 for females. The per capita income for the township was $50,698. About 0.7% of families and 1.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.7% of those under age 18 and 0.9% of those age 65 or over.[49][50]

Economy[edit]

Cranbury is host to many warehouses along Route 130 and the roads leading to the NJ Turnpike. A company making the Boy Scout Pinewood Derby cars is also here. Cranbury was noted for a used Rolls-Royce dealership located in the center of township, but it has gone out of business. The alternative energy business Blacklight Power, which occupies a building formerly occupied by Creative Playthings, is in fact located in East Windsor, in an area served by the Cranbury Post Office.

The Associated University Presses is an academic publishing company supplying textbooks to colleges and universities.[52]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Cranbury Town Hall, the Old Cranbury School

Cranbury Township is governed under the Township form of government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 565) statewide governed under this form.[53] The Township Committee is comprised of five members, who are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[7][54] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor. In 1990, the Cranbury Township Committee was expanded from three to five members and the position of Township Administrator by ordinance.[3]

As of 2022, members of the Cranbury Township Committee are Mayor Barbara F. Rogers (D, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2022), Deputy Mayor Michael J. Ferrante (D, term on committee ends 2024, term as deputy mayor ends 2022), Eman El-Badawi (D, 2024), Matthew A. Scott (D, 2023) and M. Evelyn Spann (R, 2022).[3][55][56][57][58]

In 2018, the township had an average property tax bill of $11,960, the highest in the county, compared to an average bill of $8,767 statewide.[59]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Cranbury Township is located in the 12th Congressional District[60] and is part of New Jersey's 14th state legislative district.[10][61][62]

For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Bonnie Watson Coleman (D, Ewing Township).[63][64] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[65] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[66][67]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 14th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Linda R. Greenstein (D, Plainsboro Township) and in the General Assembly by Daniel R. Benson (D, Hamilton Township, Mercer County) and Wayne DeAngelo (D, Hamilton Township, Mercer County).[68]

Middlesex County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners, whose seven members are elected at-large on a partisan basis to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects from among its members a Commissioner Director and Deputy Director.[69] As of 2022, Middlesex County's Commissioners (with party affiliation, term-end year, and residence listed in parentheses) are Commissioner Director Ronald G. Rios (D, Carteret, term as commissioner ends December 31, 2024; term as commissioner director ends 2022),[70] Commissioner Deputy Director Shanti Narra (D, North Brunswick, term as commissioner ends 2024; term as deputy director ends 2022),[71] Claribel A. "Clary" Azcona-Barber (D, New Brunswick, 2022),[72] Charles Kenny (D, Woodbridge Township, 2022),[73] Leslie Koppel (D, Monroe Township, 2023),[74] Chanelle Scott McCullum (D, Piscataway, 2024)[75] and Charles E. Tomaro (D, Edison, 2023).[76][77] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Nancy Pinkin (D, 2025, East Brunswick),[78][79] Sheriff Mildred S. Scott (D, 2022, Piscataway)[80][81] and Surrogate Claribel Cortes (D, 2026; North Brunswick).[82][83][84]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,768 registered voters in Cranbury Township, of which 836 (30.2%) were registered as Democrats, 684 (24.7%) were registered as Republicans and 1,246 (45.0%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered as either Libertarians or Greens.[85]

Presidential Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016[86] 37.1% 794 55.9% 1,196 7.0% 150
2012[87] 46.9% 971 52.0% 1,076 1.1% 22
2008[88] 45.3% 986 53.0% 1,153 1.3% 29
2004[89] 50.8% 1,044 48.0% 987 0.9% 23

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 52.0% of the vote (1,076 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 46.9% (971 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (22 votes), among the 2,082 ballots cast by the township's 2,839 registered voters (13 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 73.3%.[90][91] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 53.0% of the vote (1,153 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 45.3% (986 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (29 votes), among the 2,176 ballots cast by the township's 2,777 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.4%.[88] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 50.8% of the vote (1,044 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 48.0% (987 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (23 votes), among the 2,055 ballots cast by the township's 2,510 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 81.9.[89]

Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2017[92] 47.2% 655 51.6% 716 1.2% 17
2013[93] 67.1% 941 31.3% 439 1.6% 22
2009[94] 54.6% 901 35.5% 585 9.4% 155
2005[95] 50.9% 787 44.7% 691 3.2% 49

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 67.1% of the vote (941 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 31.3% (439 votes), and other candidates with 1.6% (22 votes), among the 1,421 ballots cast by the township's 2,850 registered voters (19 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 49.9%.[93][96] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 54.6% of the vote (901 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 35.5% (585 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.7% (144 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (11 votes), among the 1,649 ballots cast by the township's 2,711 registered voters, yielding a 60.8% turnout.[97]

Education[edit]

The Cranbury School District serves children in public school for pre-kindergarten through eighth grade at Cranbury School.[98][99] As of the 2020–2021 school year, the district, comprised of one school, had an enrollment of 463 students and 55.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 8.3:1.[100][101] For the 1996–1997 school years, Cranbury School was formally designated as a National Blue Ribbon School, the highest honor that an American public school can achieve.[102] During the 2009–2010 school year, Cranbury School was awarded the Blue Ribbon School Award of Excellence a second time,[103] and a third time for the 2016–2017 school year.[104]

For ninth through twelfth grades, students move on to Princeton High School in Princeton, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Princeton Public Schools.[30][105][106][107] Cranbury Township is granted a seat on the Princeton Regional Schools Board of Education, with the designated representative only voting on issues pertaining to Princeton High School and district-wide issues.[108] As of the 2020–2021 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,555 students and 125.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.4:1.[109] Cranbury students had attended Hightstown High School and then Lawrence High School before the relationship was established with Princeton.[110]

Eighth grade students from all of Middlesex County are eligible to apply to attend the high school programs offered by the Middlesex County Vocational and Technical Schools, a county-wide vocational school district that offers full-time career and technical education at Middlesex County Academy in Edison, the Academy for Allied Health and Biomedical Sciences in Woodbridge Township and at its East Brunswick, Perth Amboy and Piscataway technical high schools, with no tuition charged to students for attendance.[111][112]

Public libraries[edit]

The Cranbury Public Library serves Cranbury residents, sharing a facility with the Cranbury School until summer 2020 when the school evicted the library to provide additional learning space during the COVID-19 pandemic. The public library has operated out of a pocket library since early 2021 while a free-standing public library is being built at 30 Park Place West.[30][113]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

View south along the New Jersey Turnpike (I-95) in Cranbury

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 51.25 miles (82.48 km) of roadways, of which 31.08 miles (50.02 km) were maintained by the municipality, 12.85 miles (20.68 km) by Middlesex County and 3.16 miles (5.09 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 4.16 miles (6.69 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[114]

Several major roads and highways pass through the township[115] Cranbury hosts a 4-mile (6.4 km) section of Interstate 95 (the New Jersey Turnpike).[116] While there are no exits in Cranbury, the township is accessible by the Turnpike in neighboring East Windsor Township (Exit 8) and Monroe Township (Exit 8A). The Molly Pitcher Service Area is located at mile marker 71.7 on the southbound side.[117]

Other significant roads passing through Cranbury include U.S. Route 130,[118] County Route 535,[119] County Route 539,[120] County Route 615[121] and County Route 614.[122]

Public transportation[edit]

Middlesex County offers the M6 MCAT shuttle route providing service to Jamesburg and Plainsboro Township.[123]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Cranbury include:

In popular culture[edit]

Cranbury is referenced in the 2014 movie Edge of Tomorrow, as the hometown of Major William Cage (played by Tom Cruise). When asked if people of Cranbury plant cranberries, Cage answered: "Tomatoes, best I've ever had."[137]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Township Committee, Cranbury Township. Accessed April 18, 2022. "The Township Committee is the governing body established by State law for the Township form of government. The membership of the Cranbury Township Committee was expanded from three to five in January 1990. The terms of the members are for three years, staggered, so that at least one member is up for election every year. The membership annually chooses one of the members as Mayor."
  4. ^ 2022 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed March 1, 2022.
  5. ^ Administration, Cranbury Township. Accessed March 29, 2022.
  6. ^ Clerk / Registrar, Cranbury Township. Accessed March 29, 2022.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 70.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Cranbury, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Cranbury township, Middlesex County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 5, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Cranbury township Archived 2011-10-06 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 5, 2012.
  12. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 22, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Cranbury, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 5, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Cranbury, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  17. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 30, 2022.
  19. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  21. ^ Guion, Payton. "Marijuana legalization would force tough choice for N.J. towns", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, November 15, 2017. Accessed November 15, 2017. "NJ Advance Media reached out to mayors in all five towns that have medical dispensaries: Bellmawr, Cranbury, Egg Harbor, Montclair and Woodbridge."
  22. ^ [1], myCentral Jersey [myCentralJersey.com], Written by Julia Duggan, July 15, 2021. Accessed August 11, 2021.
  23. ^ From George Washington to Major General Lafayette, 26 June 1778, Founders Online at National Archives and Records Administration. Accessed December 3, 2019.
  24. ^ To George Washington from Major General Lafayette, 25 June 1778, Founders Online at National Archives and Records Administration. Accessed December 3, 2019.
  25. ^ a b History, Cranbury Township. Accessed December 3, 2019. "The marshy land near the mill site might have grown cranberries, hence the name. On 18th Century maps, the name appears as Cranberry and Cranberry Town. In 1857, Reverend Joseph G. Symmes felt the name was incorrectly spelled and suggested it be changed to Cranbury. In Old English 'bury' (connoting 'burgh') could be spelled bury, bery, or berry. In 1869, the town and the brook were renamed Cranbury."
  26. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 28, 2015.
  27. ^ John Quincy Adams diary 39, 1 December 1832 - 31 May 1835, page 179, Massachusetts Historical Society. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  28. ^ A history book on Cranbury says the accident happened 4 miles from Hightstown, putting the accident near today's retirement communities in Monroe Township. However, the book refers to John Quincy Adams' diary. See Chambers, John Whiteclay. Cranbury: A New Jersey Town from the Colonial Era to the Present, p. 50. Rutgers University Press, 2012. ISBN 9780813553580. Accessed November 10, 2015.
  29. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 169-170. Accessed July 5, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d Cheslow, Jerry. "Historic, Sparsely Settled -- and Loving It", The New York Times, March 16, 1997. Accessed July 14, 2011. "The Middlesex County community is celebrating the 300th anniversary of the first documented European settlement in the area.... Cranbury pays tuition to send 106 high school students to nearby Princeton High School. According to Cranbury's Chief School Administrator, Robert J. Bartoletti, 87 percent of the town's youngsters go on to higher education.... As part of the addition, the 28,000-volume Cranbury Public Library, which shares space with the school library, is also being expanded to 6,000 square feet from 4,000 and the school's computers are to be enhanced through the networking of all of the classrooms into the library."
  31. ^ Barn Park, Cranbury Township. Accessed December 3, 2019. "The Parsonage barn originally belonged to the Parsonage Plantation, c. 1759, of the First Presbyterian Church of Cranbury. It was dismantled in 2004 and stored for five years. In 2010, a foundation was laid and the repaired timbers were re-erected with funding from the Cranbury Historical and Preservation Society, Cranbury Landmarks, Inc., and the Township of Cranbury."
  32. ^ "National Register Information System – (#80002502)". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. November 2, 2013.
  33. ^ "New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places - Middlesex County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection - Historic Preservation Office. September 28, 2021. p. 1.
  34. ^ a b c Karschner, Terry; Walsh, Ruth (January 1979). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Cranbury Historic District". National Park Service. With accompanying 77 photos
  35. ^ "Elizabeth M. Wagner History Center". Cranbury Historical and Preservation Society.
  36. ^ Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Cranbury CDP Archived 2011-10-06 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 14, 2011.
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  38. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Middlesex County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 28, 2012.
  39. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  40. ^ Areas touching Cranbury Township, MapIt. Accessed July 13, 2016.
  41. ^ Municipalities Archived February 1, 2020, at the Wayback Machine, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed December 1, 2019.
  42. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  43. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
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Further reading[edit]

  • Chambers, John Whiteclay. Cranbury: A New Jersey Town From the Colonial Era to the Present. (Rivergate Books / Rutgers University Press; 2012)

External links[edit]