Cranston Fire

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Cranston Fire
2018 07 26-01.53.36.141-CDT.jpg
Cranston Fire on July 26, 2018
LocationMountain Center and Idyllwild, Riverside County, California, United States
Coordinates33°43′N 116°48′W / 33.72°N 116.8°W / 33.72; -116.8Coordinates: 33°43′N 116°48′W / 33.72°N 116.8°W / 33.72; -116.8
Statistics[1]
Cost>$22.06 million (2018 USD)[2]
Date(s)July 25, 2018 (2018-07-25) – August 10, 2018 (2018-08-10)
Burned area13,139 acres (53 km2)
CauseArson
Buildings
destroyed
12
Fatalities0
Non-fatal injuries3
Perpetrator(s)Brandon N. McGlover
Map
Cranston Fire is located in California
Cranston Fire
Location of fire in California
Location of Cranston Fire

The Cranston Fire was a wildfire that burned in southwest Riverside County, California, in the United States. The fire was started on July 25, 2018 by Brandon M. McGlover, in an act of arson. The fire burned a total of 13,139 acres (53 km2), before it was fully contained on August 10. The Cranston Fire impacted the communities of Idyllwild and Mountain Center, as well as recreational activities in the Lake Hemet area, San Bernardino National Forest and Mount San Jacinto State Park. Over 7,000 people were evacuated due to the Cranston Fire.

Events[edit]

July[edit]

The Cranston Fire allegedly was started on July 25, around noon, by Brandon M. McGlover, who allegedly started numerous fires in the region that day. By the evening, the fire had burned 4,700 acres (19 km2), with five percent containment. Over 2,000 people were evacuated, including Mountain Center, Idyllwild, Lake Hemet, a Girl Scouts camp and more. Portions of Highway 74 and Highway 243 were closed.[1]

The next day, the fire had reached approximately 7,500 acres (30 km2) and was at three percent containment. Evacuations were expanded to include Cedar Glen, Fern Valley, Mount San Jacinto State Park, and Pine Cove. Numerous areas, including campgrounds, in both the State Park and San Bernardino National Forest were closed. The fire was reported to have destroyed five homes.[1]

By July 27, over 7,000 people were evacuated due to the Cranston Fire. The fire had short, active runs in the southeast area of the fire, however, good suppression efforts were made. Caltrans focused on removing debris from highways.[1] By the next day, July 28, two firefighters were reported injured and Hamilton High School was named an evacuation center. The fire continued to grow into Garner Valley.[3] Evacuation orders were put in place, and then lifted later that evening, for Garner Valley.[1] Crews made significant efforts to keep the fire out of the southern and eastern parts of Idyllwild as the fire threatened fire retardant lines. Repopulation began in areas of Garner Valley and on July 29 repopulation started in Fern Valley, Pine Cove, Cedar Glen, and parts of Idyllwild.[4] By that evening, 560 people remained evacuated and the fire had been over half contained. Twelve buildings had been damaged and five damaged. One shelter was closed.[5]

Crews focused on mopping up and securing the fire's edge and containment lines were near finished around Idyllwild. Repair began to reduce erosion and mitigate impacts to natural resources as a result of fire suppression efforts.[6] The next day, July 31, Southern California Edison crews focused on restoring power by installing new power poles.[7] Hazard trees were removed and light precipitation aided in fire suppression.[8] By the evening of July 31, the fire had burned 13,139 acres (53 km2) and was 89 percent contained.[1]

August[edit]

As the Cranston Fire continued to burn into August, no new growth was reported. Teams began to be demobilized as the fire moved towards containment with mop up and suppression repair efforts in progress. Caltrans focused on removing hazardous trees on roadways while Southern California Edison focused on power restoration. Evacuation orders were lifted for Idyllwild, Pine Cove, Fern Valley, Cedar Glen and the western portion of Garner Valley up to Lake View Drive at the Lake Hemet Market.[9] By the morning of August 2, the Cranston Fire had burned 13,139 acres (53 km2) and was 92 percent contained, with 100 percent containment anticipated by August 9.[1][10] On August 10, 2018, the Cranston Fire was fully contained.[1]

Impact[edit]

The fire caused evacuations in residential areas, including Mountain Center, Idyllwild, Pine Cove, and Cedar Glen, as well as evacuations and closures in Mount San Jacinto State Park and the San Jacinto Ranger District of the San Bernardino National Forest. It also caused road closures along Highway 74 and Highway 243, impacting access to Hemet. Parts of Highway 74 and Highway 243 were later closed multiple times due to the threat of mudslides caused by the fire.[11] Areas in the Mountain Center area were also ordered to evacuate multiple times due to this threat.[12] Additionally, it caused numerous trail closures, including the Pacific Crest Trail. Parts of the National Forest were ordered closed until July 31, 2019.[13] Over 7,000 people were evacuated due to the fire.[1]

Transportation[edit]

Cranston Fire on July 27

Numerous portions of Highway 74, Highway 371 and Highway 243 were closed as a result of the fire, specifically in the areas of Hemet and Banning. Temporary flight restrictions were in place for the area.[1] The Palm Springs Aerial Tramway was closed for four days due to the fire.[14]

Recreation[edit]

San Bernardino National Forest was closed as a result of the Cranston Fire. Additional recreational closures included Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument and Mount San Jacinto State Park.[1]

Investigation[edit]

On July 25, the same day the fire was reported, CAL FIRE arrested Brandon N. McGlover for setting multiple fires in Riverside County. He was charged with 15 felony counts of arson for starting nine fires.[15] McGlover was sentenced to 12 year and four months in prison, must register as an arsonist for life, and is required to pay restitution to victims.[16]

Brandon N. McGlover

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Cranston Information - InciWeb the Incident Information System". InciWeb. USDA Forest Service, Fire and Aviation Management. Retrieved 26 July 2018.
  2. ^ "2018 National Large Incident Year-to-Date Report" (PDF). CAL FIRE. August 28, 2018. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  3. ^ "Cranston Fire Morning Update 07/28/2018 - InciWeb the Incident Information System". inciweb.nwcg.gov. USDA Forest Service, Fire and Aviation Management. Retrieved 29 July 2018.
  4. ^ "Cranston Fire Morning Update 07/29/2018 - InciWeb the Incident Information System". InciWeb. USDA Forest Service, Fire and Aviation Management. Retrieved 31 July 2018.
  5. ^ "Cranston Fire Evening Update 07292018 - InciWeb the Incident Information System". InciWeb. USDA Forest Service, Fire and Aviation Management. Retrieved 31 July 2018.
  6. ^ "Cranston Fire Morning Update 07/30/2018 - InciWeb the Incident Information System". InciWeb. USDA Forest Service, Fire and Aviation Management. Retrieved 31 July 2018.
  7. ^ "Cranston Fire Morning Update 07/31/2018 - InciWeb the Incident Information System". InciWeb. USDA Forest Service, Fire and Aviation Management. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  8. ^ "Cranston Fire Evening Update 07/31/2018 - InciWeb the Incident Information System". InciWeb. USDA Forest Service, Fire and Aviation Management. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  9. ^ "Cranston Fire Morning Update 08/01/2018". InciWeb. USDA Forest Service, Fire and Aviation Management. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  10. ^ "Cranston Fire expected to be contained by August 9". KESQ. City News Service. 1 August 2018. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  11. ^ "#HWY74 and #HWY243 could close at a moment notice due to rain/mudslides #CALTRANS – FF". Idyllwild Emergency. Mountain Disaster Preparedness. Retrieved 22 Aug 2018.
  12. ^ "Emergency alert: Fleming Ranch, Strawberry creek, Hurkey Creek, Apple Canyon ordered to evacuate – FF". Idyllwild Emergency. Mountain Disaster Preparedness. Retrieved 22 Aug 2018.
  13. ^ "Order No. 12-18-05" (PDF). InciWeb. USDA Forest Service, Fire and Aviation Management. Retrieved 22 Aug 2018.
  14. ^ Forgione, Mary. "Palm Springs tram reopens after four-day closure because of the Cranston fire". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2 August 2018.
  15. ^ "ARSON ARREST MADE BY CAL FIRE LAW ENFORCEMENT ON CRANSTON FIRE... - InciWeb the Incident Information System". InciWeb. USDA Forest Service, Fire and Aviation Management. Retrieved 27 July 2018.
  16. ^ "Brandon McGlover pleads guilty to arson charges in Cranston Fire case, gets 12 years in prison". Desert Sun. USA Today. Retrieved 14 July 2019.

External links[edit]