Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage and Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy

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Crash Bandicoot Purple:
Ripto's Rampage
Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy
Crash Bandicoot Purple - Ripto's Rampage Coverart.png
Spyro Orange - The Cortex Conspiracy Coverart.png
The North American cover arts for Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage and Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy
Developer(s) Vicarious Visions
Publisher(s) Vivendi Universal Games[a]
Producer(s) Caroline Trujillo
Designer(s) Jonathan Russell
Colin Wilkinson
Programmer(s) Sunbir Gill
Jan-Erik Steel
Eric Caraszi
Artist(s) Brent Gibson
Chongguang Zhang
Robyn Poirier
Jason Harlow
Composer(s) Manfred Linzer
Series Crash Bandicoot
Spyro
Platform(s) Game Boy Advance
Release
  • NA: June 3, 2004
  • EU: June 25, 2004
  • JP: December 9, 2004
Genre(s) Platform
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer

Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage and Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy are two platform games published by Vivendi Universal Games. They are developed by Vicarious Visions for the Game Boy Advance. They were released in North America on June 3, 2004, and in Europe on June 25, 2004 (under the names Crash Bandicoot Fusion and Spyro Fusion) and in Japan on December 9, 2004 as (Crash Bandicoot Advance and Spyro Advance Wakuwaku Tomodachi Dai Sakusen!).

The game is the tenth installment in the Crash Bandicoot series of video games, and the eighth installment in the Spyro series of video games.[1] For both series, the games are the fourth installments made for the Game Boy Advance.[1][2] This crossover is set after the events of their games for that platform. The story of the games centre on a plot to wreak havoc on the universe by the main antagonists Doctor Neo Cortex and Ripto, who have recently joined forces. The protagonists of the story, Crash Bandicoot and Spyro the Dragon, must team up and defeat Doctor Cortex and Ripto along with their genetically modified minions.

Gameplay[edit]

Ripto's Rampage and The Cortex Conspiracy are single-player side-scrolling crossover adventure games in which the player controls Crash Bandicoot and/or Spyro the Dragon in the respective games.[3] While the games feature platforming elements that allow Crash and Spyro to navigate different areas, the main focus is on a series of minigames that make up the core of the gameplay.[1][2] The minigames involve distinctively different gameplay elements, such as destroying enemies in a Breakout-inspired challenge or racing through an area with a jet pack, tank or inner tube.[1][2] The games make use of the Game Link Cable, allowing players to compete in multiplayer versions of several of the minigames found in the games.[2] Much of these minigames only require one copy of either of the games for as many as four players in the network.[1][2] Players can earn trading cards by performing specific tasks; these cards can be traded between Game Boy Advance systems to players who do not physically own a copy of the games.[2] Additional content can be accessed if the two games are linked to each other.[2]

Plot[edit]

Doctor Neo Cortex and Ripto join forces to rid themselves of their respective adversaries Crash Bandicoot and Spyro the Dragon by genetically modifying Ripto's "Riptoc" minions and disguising them as Crash and Spyro, leading the two protagonists to believe they are against each other.[4][5] Crash and Spyro are alerted of their respective worlds' predicament and are sent to get rid of the disguised Riptocs.[6][7] Crash and Spyro eventually encounter each other between Wumpa Jungle and Dragon Castles, believing each other to be a disguised Riptoc.[8] However, they soon discover that they have been tricked into fighting each other by Cortex and Ripto and decide to team up against them.[9][10]

Spyro and Crash's recent success leads to an argument between Cortex and Ripto so they decide to send Cortex's niece, Nina Cortex, to Fire Mountain where she kidnaps Coco and the Professor. Blink the Mole informs Crash and Spyro of the kidnapping. When the duo confronted Nina, Crash distracts Nina having her chase him so Spyro can free Coco and the Professor unnoticed. This worked as Coco and the Professor are free while Nina is trapped in a cage. The Professor is disappointed as their work to track down Cortex and Ripto is destroyed so Coco hatches an idea: If Crash and Spyro can put a tracer on Cortex and Ripto, they would track them to their headquarters so the duo splits up and go to each other's home world this way their respective nemesis won't suspect anything. Only Spyro succeeds in planting a tracer on Cortex. Crash and Spyro reach their headquarters in outer space called Tech Park. As a team, Crash and Spyro defeat Cortex and Ripto once and for all.

Development[edit]

As production finished on Crash Nitro Kart, Vivendi Universal Games contemplated the next handheld game in the Crash Bandicoot series. Hoping to do something different from what has been done before, Vivendi Universal Games approached Vicarious Visions with the concept of bringing Crash Bandicoot and Spyro the Dragon together for the first time. Liking the idea, Vicarious Visions collaborated with Vivendi Universal Games in filling out the concept to what would become the two games.[11]

The game was designed by Jonathan Russell and Colin Wilkinson. The game was programmed by Sunbir Gill, Jan-Erik Steel and Eric Caraszi. Brent Gibson, Chongguang Zhang, Robyn Poirier and Jason Harlow served as the game's artists, while Harlow, Travis Cameron, Kaan Kayimoglu and Rob Gallerani provided the game's animation. The game's audio was provided by Manfred Linzer of Shin'en Multimedia .[12]Manfred Linzer went uncredited.

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate score
AggregatorScore
Metacritic67/100 (Crash Purple)[13]
60/100 (Spyro Orange)[14]
Review scores
PublicationScore
Eurogamer7/10 (Crash Purple)[15]
4/10 (Spyro Orange)[15]
Game Informer5.75/10 (Crash Purple)[16]
5.75/10 (Spyro Orange)[17]
GameSpot7.7/10 (Crash Purple)[18]
5.9/10 (Spyro Orange)[19]
GameSpy3/5 (Crash Purple)[20]
3/5 (Spyro Orange)[21]
GameZone5.3/10 (Crash Purple)[22]
6.5/10 (Spyro Orange)[23]
IGN7/10 (Crash Purple)[24]
Nintendo Power7/10 (Crash Purple)[13]
7.2/10 (Spyro Orange)[14]
PlayC+ (Crash Purple)[13]

Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage received mostly positive reviews from critics upon its release. Frank Provo of GameSpot credited the game as "a good, solid choice for fans of the genre", citing its strong minigames and well-made platforming mechanics.[18] Craig Harris of IGN found that the game "offers a lot of challenge and variety with a ton of single and multiplayer mini-games", but described the overall design of the game as "loosely constructed with a comparatively wimpy, underdeveloped overworld design".[24] Tom Bramwell of Eurogamer criticized the minigames and warned experienced gamers that the collection would "quickly become far too familiar and untaxing to warrant extended interest."[15] Nintendo Power said that the game "presents a steady stream of minigames with tons of variety".[13] Play Magazine considered the game superior to its "crossover cousin" The Cortex Conspiracy, but decided that the game "still feels cheap".[13] David Chapman of GameSpy praised the library of minigames and the extras unlocked when the game is linked with a copy of The Cortex Conspiracy,[20] while Lisa Mason of Game Informer criticized the platforming levels as "derivative and uninspired" and the minigames as "frustrating and not very much fun at all".[16] Louis Bedigian of GameZone noted the plentiful minigames, but found the game to be lacking in adventuring, platforming or excitement.[22]

The Cortex Conspiracy was generally rated lower than Ripto's Rampage by critics. David Chapman of GameSpy said that the game "has plenty to keep most gamers entertained for hours", and noted that the connectivity options with Ripto's Rampage resulted in a "surefire formula for success".[21] Nintendo Power concluded that the graphics and gameplay were "a step up from those of Spyro's isometric-view adventures".[14] Anise Hollingshead of GameZone concluded that The Cortex Conspiracy is "an average game that will give a decent amount of gameplay value, but just doesn't offer much in the way of excitement or thinking", and went on to say that "having lots of mini-games is a good idea, but the games themselves needed to be more varied and not just be various versions of racing games and breakout clones".[23] Frank Provo of GameSpot decided that "on its own, there really isn't enough to Spyro Orange to keep players interested for very long".[19] Lisa Mason of Game Informer dismissed the game as "just a mishmash of concepts that never really gel into anything great".[17] Tom Bramwell of Eurogamer criticized the minigames and warned experienced gamers that the collection would "quickly become far too familiar and untaxing to warrant extended interest".[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Craig Harris (2004-04-23). "IGN: Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy Preview". IGN. Retrieved 9 September 2009.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Craig Harris (2004-04-20). "IGN: Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage Preview". IGN. Retrieved 9 September 2009.
  3. ^ Craig Harris (2004-02-20). "IGN: Spyro and Crash Pair Up". IGN. Retrieved 9 September 2009.
  4. ^ Vicarious Visions (June 3, 2004). Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage. Game Boy Advance. Vivendi Games. Level/area: Opening sequence. Doctor Neo Cortex: So it's agreed, Ripto. We'll work together to rid ourselves of Spyro and Crash. My genetic modifications to your army of Riptocs will cause those two even more trouble! / Ripto: Yes, Cortex! And dressing them up as Crash and Spyro... ha ha ha! Our foes won't even realize they should be on the same side! / Doctor Neo Cortex: I'll activate the warp pads. Soon I... er, we, shall conquer this measly planet! Ha ha ha ha ha!
  5. ^ Vicarious Visions (June 3, 2004). Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy. Game Boy Advance. Vivendi Games. Level/area: Opening sequence. Ripto: So it's agreed, then. We'll work together to rid ourselves of Spyro and Crash. / Doctor Neo Cortex: Yes! Your army of Riptocs will be even more formidable now that I have genetically modified them. / Ripto: True! They have strength! They know no fear! And they are cleverly disguised! / Doctor Neo Cortex: Activate your Portals and we shall soon conquer this measly planet!
  6. ^ Vicarious Visions (June 3, 2004). Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage. Game Boy Advance. Vivendi Games. Level/area: Opening sequence. Aku Aku: Crash, I'm afraid Cortex is up to his old tricks again. This time he's recruited new dragon-like creatures to steal the Power Crystals! They must be stopped! / Coco Bandicoot: The Warp Pads all over the jungle each lead to a purple Power Crystal. We can't let Cortex get his hands on them! It's up to you to save the world again, Crash!
  7. ^ Vicarious Visions (June 3, 2004). Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy. Game Boy Advance. Vivendi Games. Level/area: Opening sequence. The Professor: Spyro, I'm glad you're here! / Hunter: Something strange is happening in Dragon Castles. / Professor: Strange indeed! Mysterious Portals have been appearing across the land. Even worse, crazed orange beasts have been causing trouble. / Spyro the Dragon: It sounds like Ripto is up to no good again. / The Professor: I'll see what I can find out about these Portals. Meantime, Spyro, try to get rid of those monsters.
  8. ^ Vicarious Visions (June 3, 2004). Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage. Game Boy Advance. Vivendi Games. Level/area: Dragon Castles. Aku Aku: I wonder where that last Portal has brought us, Crash? I can see a castle over this chasm. Look, a purple dragon! I wonder if it's the same kind of strange creature terrorizing Wumpa Jungle? / Spyro the Dragon: You must be another one of Ripto's creatures! You think you're just going to take over the world? How about taking on Spyro the Dragon, first!
  9. ^ Vicarious Visions (June 3, 2004). Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage. Game Boy Advance. Vivendi Games. Level/area: Dragon Castles. Spyro the Dragon: Wait! You're not like those other creatures back at Dragon Castles. / Aku Aku: This is Crash Bandicoot and I'm Aku Aku. I fear our enemy Neo Cortex is behind all of this. / Spyro the Dragon: I'm Spyro and this is Sparx. Wait, you say Cortex is behind this? To me, this seems like the work of Ripto! Those creatures look an awful lot like his Riptocs. / Aku Aku: Oh no, it's worse than I expected. It appears that Cortex has teamed up with a villain as nefarious as himself - your enemy Ripto! The two of them working together may have enough power to take over the world! / Spyro the Dragon: I bet they wanted us to fight each other instead of going after them! If we team up, though, they won't stand a chance against us! Come on, Crash, let's go!
  10. ^ Vicarious Visions (June 3, 2004). Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy. Game Boy Advance. Vivendi Games. Level/area: Dragon Castles. Spyro the Dragon: Wait! You're not like those other orange monsters. You must be Crash, huh? I'm Spyro, perhaps you've heard of me? It looks as though Ripto and Cortex have teamed up against us. I bet the one thing they didn't count on was that we would team up against them. Come on!
  11. ^ Craig Harris (2004-04-29). "IGN: VV on Spyro and Crash". IGN. Retrieved 9 September 2009.
  12. ^ Vicarious Visions (June 3, 2004). Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage. Game Boy Advance. Vivendi Games. Level/area: Credits.
  13. ^ a b c d e "Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage". Metacritic. Archived from the original on 2011-06-15. Retrieved 2008-09-28.
  14. ^ a b c "Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy". Metacritic. Archived from the original on 2009-11-10. Retrieved 2009-09-09.
  15. ^ a b c d Tom Bramwell (2004-07-19). "Crash Bandicoot: Fusion vs. Spyro: Fusion Review // GBA /// Eurogamer". Eurogamer. Retrieved 28 September 2008. The gripes are really mainly relating to the individual games, which for anyone remotely experienced will quickly become far too familiar and untaxing to warrant extended interest.
  16. ^ a b Lisa Mason (2004-06-01). "Game Informer Online". Game Informer. Retrieved 3 January 2009. The platforming levels are derivative and uninspired. Though dull, these sections are broken up frequently by minigames that, more so than in "Spyro Orange," are frustrating and not very much fun at all.
  17. ^ a b Lisa Mason (2004-06-01). "Game Informer Online". Game Informer. Archived from the original on 2008-10-11. Retrieved 9 September 2009. Just a mishmash of concepts that never really gel into anything great.
  18. ^ a b Frank Provo (2004-06-23). "Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage for Game Boy Advance Review". GameSpot. Retrieved 28 September 2008. With its strong minigames and well-made platforming mechanics, Crash Bandicoot Purple is a good, solid choice for fans of the genre.
  19. ^ a b Frank Provo (2004-06-23). "Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy Review for Game Boy Advance - GameSpot". GameSpot. Retrieved 9 September 2009. On its own, there really isn't enough to Spyro Orange to keep players interested for very long.
  20. ^ a b David Chapman (journalist) (2004-06-21). "GameSpy: Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage Review". GameSpy. Archived from the original on 29 August 2008. Retrieved 3 January 2009. The library of mini-games alone makes the game a must have for anyone looking for hours of mindless fun. Add to that all of the cool extras unlocked when linked with a copy of Spyro Orange, and you end up with an awesome cross-franchise certain to leave you craving more.
  21. ^ a b David Chapman (journalist) (2004-06-21). "GameSpy: Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy Review". GameSpy. Archived from the original on 7 October 2008. Retrieved 9 September 2009. On its own, it has plenty to keep most gamers entertained for hours. Add to that the connectivity options with Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Revenge and you end up with a surefire formula for success.
  22. ^ a b Louis Bedigian (2004-06-06). "Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage Review - Game Boy Advance". GameZone. Archived from the original on 4 November 2008. Retrieved 3 January 2009. Mini-games aplenty, but where has all the adventuring gone? Where's the platforming action? Or the excitement? They're nowhere to be found in this game.
  23. ^ a b Anise Hollingshead (2004-06-13). "Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy Review - Game Boy Advance". GameZone. Archived from the original on 3 November 2008. Retrieved 9 September 2009. An average game that will give a decent amount of gameplay value, but just doesn't offer much in the way of excitement or thinking. Having lots of mini-games is a good idea, but the games themselves needed to be more varied and not just be various versions of racing games and breakout clones.
  24. ^ a b Craig Harris (2004-06-01). "IGN: Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage Review". IGN. Retrieved 28 September 2008. Offers a lot of challenge and variety with a ton of single and multiplayer mini-games, and it's this that saves the entire design. It's just a shame that all of it is loosely constructed with a comparatively wimpy, underdeveloped overworld design.
  1. ^ Released under the Coktel brand in PAL regions