Crawley railway station

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Crawley National Rail
View of Crawley Railway station from footbridge - geograph.org.uk - 1176266.jpg
Crawley Railway Station
Location
PlaceCrawley
Local authorityCrawley, West Sussex
Grid referenceTQ270363
Operations
Station codeCRW
Managed bySouthern
Number of platforms2
DfT categoryD
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2013/14Decrease 2.018 million
2014/15Decrease 1.997 million
2015/16Decrease 1.982 million
2016/17Decrease 1.653 million
2017/18Increase 1.717 million
History
14 February 1848Opening of original station
28 July 1968Closure of original station and opening of present station to the east
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Crawley from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

Crawley railway station is a railway station serving the town of Crawley in West Sussex, England. It is 30 miles 49 chains (49.3 km) down the line from London Bridge, measured via Redhill.[1] It is operated by Southern. The station is the last stop on the Arun Valley Line before it joins the Brighton Main Line.

History[edit]

Crawley Station in 2008 showing the original now disused platforms.

.

The single track branch line of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway between Three Bridges and Horsham was opened 14 February 1848.[2] Crawley and Faygate were intermediate stations each with two platforms to enable trains to pass. The line was doubled throughout during 1862 to coincide with the extension of the railway from Horsham to the Arun Valley.

The first Crawley station was situated immediately adjacent to the main High Street, with station buildings on the north side of the railway line.[3]

With the continued development of the New Town during the 1950s and 1960s it soon became clear that the station was too small, and a new station building was opened 28 July 1968 at the current site.[4] The new station was funded by a six-storey commercial development above the new British Rail station. The original station buildings were demolished in August 1968, but the platforms still survive.

A planning application[5] was approved in 16 August 2016 for the demolition and redevelopment of the station buildings to include residential apartments, retail space and multi-storey car parking.

Facilities[edit]

  • Concourse
  • Ticket office (x2)
  • Quick Ticket
  • Vending Machine
  • Pumpkin Cafe
  • Waiting room (x2)
  • Toilets
  • Car Park
  • Bicycle storage
  • Ticket Barriers

Services[edit]

As of May 2019, the typical off-peak service in trains per hour is:

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Thameslink
Southern

Signal box[edit]

Crawley Signal Box

The original signal box, dating from 1877, survives. It is a tall box with a timber superstructure on a brick base and was built by the firm of Saxby and Farmer.[6] It was made redundant in 1978 when the railway level crossing gates were removed. It is a Grade II listed building[7] and has recently been partially restored.

The former goods yard to the east of the old Crawley Station was closed in the 1960s and demolished to make way for the new station.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yonge, John (November 2008) [1994]. Jacobs, Gerald (ed.). Railway Track Diagrams 5: Southern & TfL (3rd ed.). Bradford on Avon: Trackmaps. map 19B. ISBN 978-0-9549866-4-3.
  2. ^ *Howard Turner, Charles (1977). The London Brighton and South Coast Railway. 1 Origins and Formation (1st edn ed.). London: Batsford. ISBN 978-0-7134-0275-9. 232-4.
  3. ^ Bastable, Roger (1999). No.1 Crawley High Street in Photographs. Crawley: Roger Bastable Publications. pp. 54–57.
  4. ^ Body, Geoffrey (1989). PSL field guide to the railways of Southern Region. Wellinborough: Patrick stephens Ltd. p. 75. ISBN 978-1-85260-297-0.
  5. ^ "Planning Application - CR/2016/0294/OUT".
  6. ^ *Minnis, John (2012). Railway Signal Boxes: a Review (PDF) (1st edn ed.). London: Ebglish Heritage. ISSN 2046-9799. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help) 9.
  7. ^ "Railway Signal Box, Crawley, West Sussex".

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°06′43″N 0°11′13″W / 51.112°N 0.187°W / 51.112; -0.187