Crazyhouse

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1.N@e7+ Kh8 2.Bxg7# (@ notation)

Crazyhouse (also known as drop chess, mad chess, reinforcement chess, turnabout chess and schizo-chess) is a chess variant similar to bughouse chess, but with only two players. It effectively incorporates a rule from the game shogi, in which a player can introduce a captured piece back to the chessboard as their own.


Rules[edit]

All the rules and conventions of standard chess apply, with the addition of drops, as explained below.

  • A captured piece reverses color and goes to the capturing player's reserve or pocket. At any time, instead of making a move with a piece on the board, a player can drop a piece from their reserve onto an empty square on the board.
    For example, a check that would result in checkmate in standard chess can be answered in Crazyhouse, if the defender can play a legal drop that blocks the check.[1]
  • Drops resulting in immediate checkmate are permitted. Unlike in shogi, this includes pawn drops.[2]
  • Pawns may not be dropped on the players' 1st or 8th ranks.[2]
  • Pawns that have been promoted and later captured are dropped as pawns.[2]
  • Dropped white and black pawn on 2nd and 7th rank respectively can move as same as the start position.[3]
  • Cannot castle with a dropped rook.[4]

Unlike shogi, having two or more pawns on a file, and checkmating with a dropped pawn, are both permissible.

The physical problem of changing the color of a captured piece can be handled by[5]:

  • Swopping the piece for a piece of the same denomination and the other color taken from a second chess set.
  • Playing the game through a computer interface.

Notation[edit]

An extension to the standard chess notation is used to record drops. Drops are notated by the piece type, followed by an @ symbol, then the destination square. For example, N@d5 means "knight is dropped on d5 from reserve".[1]

FEN[edit]

There is no standard FEN specification for Crazyhouse. However at Lichess extended version of FEN is in use. Here is Lichess's FEN implemention example.[6]

r2qk3/pp2bqR1/2p5/8/3Pn3/3BPpB1/PPPp1PPP/RK1R4/PNNNbpp b - - 89 45

Lichess simply adds a 0th rank as a reserve. There are more than 8 pieces on the reserve, so the last section may have more than 8 characters.

A different notation is used by Xboard/Winboard. The reserve is given in square brackets following the board position.

r2qk3/pp2bqR1/2p5/8/3Pn3/3BPpB1/PPPp1PPP/RK1R4[PNNNbpp] b - - 89 45

Chess.com uses another notation. The reserve is put after full-move number.

To keep track of which pieces currently on the board are actually promoted pawns, Lichess and Xboard/Winboard use "~" after letter designation. However, Chess.com uses coordinates of promoted pawn to resolve it.[7]

r2q1r1k/2p1ppb1/p2p2pp/3P1p2/B6B/2N2NPp/1PP2P1K/3Q3q w - - 0 26 NNBRpr h1

Competitions[edit]

Lichess World Crazyhouse Championship[edit]

Lichess CrazyHouse World Championship 2018[edit]

After an impressive run going undefeated in the earlier final rounds,Netherlands IM Vincent Rothuis "Opperwezen" defeats Justin Tan in 60 rounds becomes the second ever Crazyhouse World Champion with a final score of 33.5/60 (verification needed).

Lichess CrazyHouse World Championship 2017[edit]

1/8 Final[edit]

Each round consist of a match of 10 parties with 3 minutes per player.

1/8 Final
1 Australia Justin Tan "JannLee" 9 Decision Problem.png "saturos" 6-0
2 Decision Problem.png "Allyouneedisluft" 10 United States NM Jalen Wang "Blitzbullet" 5-7
3 Canada Janak Awatramani "TwelveTeen" 11 United States Nikolas Theiss "Atrophied" 6-3
4 Australia "Mastertan" 12 Decision Problem.png "sexy_and_i_know_it" 6-1
5 United States FM Dan Yeager "Chickencrossroad" 13 Decision Problem.png "B0N0B0" 7-5
6 Spain Juan Miquel "xuanet" 14 United States GM Andrew Tang "Penguingm1" 6-3
7 Netherlands IM Vincent Rothuis "Opperwezen" 15 Australia IM Igor Bjelobrk "Bugzilla" 6-4
8 United States Ian Mark "Eekarf" 17 United States Brett Passen "Crosky" 9-1
the 8th Candidate[edit]
Format Plce 1st, gold medalist(s) 2nd, silver medalist(s) 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Arena × 3 min Lichess Australia IM Vincent Rothuis "opperwezen" Decision Problem.png "Masalaka" Spain Juan Miquel "Xuanet"
Tournament of the Candidates[edit]
Tournament of the Candidates[8] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 Canada Janak Awatramani "TwelveTeen" 6 44 XXXXX 1/2 5-5 1 6-4 1/2 5-5 1 6-4 1 8-2 1 6-4 1 8-2
2 Australia Justin Tan "JannLee" 5 43 1/2 5-5 XXXXX 1 7-3 1/2 5-5 0 4-6 1 8-2 1 8-2 1 6-4
3 Netherlands IM Vincent Rothuis "Opperwezen" 4.5 40 0 4-6 0 3-7 XXXXX 1 8-2 1/2 5-5 1 6-4 1 6-4 1 8-2
4 United States NM Jalen Wang "Blitzbullet" 4 34 1/2 5-5 1/2 5-5 0 2-8 XXXXX 1 6-4 1/2 5-5 1 6-4 1/2 5-5
5 Australia "Mastertan" 3 32 0 4-6 1 6-4 1/2 5-5 0 4-6 XXXXX 0 1-9 1 7-3 1/2 5-5
6 Spain Juan Miquel "xuanet" 2.5 32 0 2-8 0 2-8 0 4-6 1/2 5-5 1 9-1 XXXXX 1/2 5-5 1/2 5-5
7 United States Ian Mark "Eekarf" 1.5 28 0 4-6 0 2-8 0 4-6 0 4-6 0 3-7 1/2 5-5 XXXXX 1 6-4
8 Decision Problem.png "Allyouneedisluft" 1.5 27 0 2-8 0 4-6 0 2-8 1/2 5-5 1/2 5-5 1/2 5-5 0 4-6 XXXXX
World Championship[edit]
Format Place World Championship 1st Match 2nd Match 3rd Match Total
3 match of 20 rounds × 3 min + 0 s Lichess Australia Justin Tan "JannLee" 10 10 11.5 31.5
Canada Janak Awatramani "TwelveTeen" 10 10 8.5 28.5

Chess.com Championship[edit]

Chess.com Crazyhouse Championships 2016[edit]

Chess.com Crazyhouse Championships 2016[9]
1 Australia Justin Tan "JannLee" 9 United States NM Todd Freitag "happytoad"
United States FM Dan Yeager "Chickencrossroad" 10 Canada Janak Awatramani "TwelveTeen"
3 Australia "mastertan" 11 United States Ian Mark "Eekarf"
4 Spain Joan Miquel "xuanet" 12 France FM Stephane Bressac "Veniveniveni"
5 United States GM Andrew Tang "Penguingm1" 13 Sweden "Zyxon"
6 Argentina GM Federico Perez Ponsa "Gengis_K" 14 United States "chriswsh"
7 Canada Matthew Buchanan "MJB223" 15 United States FM Cameron Wheeler "Caminator2000"
8 Bulgaria "sorsi" 16 United States GM Conrad Holt "dretch"

Chess.com Crazyhouse Championships 2018[edit]

Chess.com Crazyhouse Championships 2018[10]
1 Australia Justin Tan "JannLee" 9 Australia "mastertan"
2 Canada NM Mark Plotkin "littleplotkin" 10 Finland "Vempele"
3 Australia Neil Wright "Mugwort" 11 Netherlands IM Vincent Rothuis "Opperwezen"
4 Russia Konstantin Krylov "Terra87" 12 Canada "helmsknight"
5 Spain Joan Miquel "xuanet" 13 Poland FM Wojtek Reza "rezacz"
6 Japan IM "HigherContrast" 14 Vietnam CM Thanh Tu Tran "TranThanhTu"
7 Germany "CAHKT" 15 France "ciiw"
8 India "vikassawhney" 16 Turkey FM Selim Citak "Slmctk"

Variations[edit]

Minor variations of the rules have resulted in some variants.

  • Loop Chess: promoted pawns keep their rank when captured.[11]
  • Chessgi (also known as Mad Mate or Neo Chess): promoted pawns keep their rank when captured. Pawns may be dropped on the 1st rank.[12]

See also[edit]

  • Hostage Chess—a player can drop back into play their own previously captured pieces

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "crazyhouse". FICS Help. Free Internet Chess Server. 2008-02-28. Archived from the original on 2014-04-16. Retrieved 2014-04-17.
  2. ^ a b c "crazyhouse". ICC Help. Internet Chess Club. Archived from the original on 2012-05-02. Retrieved 2014-04-17.
  3. ^ This isn't written in any rulebook, but Lichess and Chess.com allowed it.
  4. ^ Also this isn't written in rule.
  5. ^ https://www.chessvariants.com/other.dir/crazyhouse.html
  6. ^ ""IM opperwezen vs LM JannLee in T6Q3tMva : Analysis board • lichess.org"". Lichess. Archived from the original on 2018-05-26. Retrieved 2018-05-26.
  7. ^ ""Chess: liviu78ro vs JannLeeCrazyhouse - 3367504566 - Chess.com"". Chess.com. Archived from the original on 2019-01-17. Retrieved 2019-01-17.
  8. ^ tournament website.
  9. ^ detail results
  10. ^ Result
  11. ^ "Game rules (Loop Chess)". BrainKing. Retrieved 2014-04-17.
  12. ^ "Chessgi". ChessVariants.org. 2001-03-20. Archived from the original on 2014-03-27. Retrieved 2014-04-17.

External links[edit]