Crew Dragon Demo-2

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Crew Dragon Demo-2
OperatorNASA
Spacecraft properties
Spacecraft typeCrew Dragon 2
ManufacturerSpaceX
Crew
Crew size2
MembersDouglas G. Hurley
Robert L. Behnken
Start of mission
Launch dateNET November 15, 2019[1]
RocketFalcon 9 Block 5
Launch siteKennedy LC-39A
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric
RegimeLow Earth
Inclination51.6 degrees
Docking with ISS
Time docked8 days
Dragon-spx-dm2.jpg 

Crew Dragon Demo-2, officially known as SpaceX Demo-2 and Crew Demo-2, will be the first crewed test flight of SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft.[2] It was planned for launch in July 2019[3] with a crew of two on a 14-day test mission to the International Space Station (ISS),[4] but the mission was delayed due to a testing incident that occurred in April 2019.[5] According to the NASA's current schedule, this mission will be the first crewed flight of an American spacecraft into orbit since STS-135 in July 2011.[6]

On April 20, 2019, the Crew Dragon capsule from the Demo-1 mission was destroyed during static fire testing of its SuperDraco thrusters, ahead of its planned use for an inflight abort test.[7] On May 28, 2019, NASA announced that "SpaceX is working to get the newly assigned Demo 2 capsule ready for flight 'by the end of the year [2019].'" On June 20, 2019, DM-2 was tentatively planned for 15 November 2019, followed by the first crewed flight of Boeing's Starliner on November 30, 2019.[8]

Crew[edit]

Bob Behnken and Douglas Hurley were announced as the crew on 3 August 2018.[4]

Position Astronaut
Commander United States Douglas G. Hurley, NASA
Third spaceflight
Pilot United States Robert L. Behnken, NASA
Third spaceflight

Back-up crew[edit]

[9]

Position Astronaut
Commander United States Michael S. Hopkins, NASA
Second spaceflight
Pilot United States Victor J. Glover, NASA
First spaceflight

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gebhardt, Chris (June 20, 2019). "Station mission planning reveals new target Commercial Crew launch dates – NASASpaceFlight.com". NASASpaceflight.com.
  2. ^ "Upcoming Missions". spacexnow.com.
  3. ^ "NASA's Commercial Crew Program Target Test Flight Dates". February 6, 2019. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  4. ^ a b Lewis, Marie (3 August 2018). "Meet the Astronauts Flying SpaceX's Demo-2". Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  5. ^ Berger, Eric (May 2, 2019). "Dragon was destroyed just before the firing of its SuperDraco thrusters". Ars Technica.
  6. ^ Gebhardt, Chris. "Station mission planning reveals new target Commercial Crew launch dates". NASA Spaceflight. Retrieved 20 June 2019.
  7. ^ Baylor, Michael (April 20, 2019). "SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft suffers an anomaly during static fire testing at Cape Canaveral – NASASpaceFlight.com". NASASpaceFlight.com.
  8. ^ Gebhardt, Chris. "Station mission planning reveals new target Commercial Crew launch dates". NASA Spaceflight. Retrieved 20 June 2019.
  9. ^ https://twitter.com/Commercial_Crew/status/1116404828656291840