Crewkerne railway station

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Crewkerne National Rail
2009 at Crewkerne station - main building.jpg
Location
PlaceCrewkerne
Local authoritySouth Somerset
Coordinates50°52′25″N 2°46′38″W / 50.8736°N 2.7771°W / 50.8736; -2.7771Coordinates: 50°52′25″N 2°46′38″W / 50.8736°N 2.7771°W / 50.8736; -2.7771
Grid referenceST453085
Operations
Station codeCKN
Managed bySouth Western Railway
Number of platforms1
DfT categoryE
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2013/14Increase 0.131 million
2014/15Increase 0.142 million
2015/16Increase 0.155 million
2016/17Increase 0.162 million
2017/18Increase 0.165 million
History
Original companyLondon and South Western Railway
Post-groupingSouthern Railway
1860Opened
1967Line singled
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Crewkerne from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

Crewkerne railway station is located in Misterton in Somerset, England, and serves the area around the town of Crewkerne. It is 131 miles 33 chains (211.5 km) from London Waterloo on the West of England Main Line to Exeter. The main building is listed Grade II and is surrounded by several other old railway buildings.

History[edit]

The goods shed built in 1860

The station was opened on 19 July 1860 when the LSWR opened its Yeovil and Exeter Railway. A wooden signal box was erected in 1875 on the eastbound platform, just east of the main offices.[1]

In 1923 the LSWR became part of the Southern Railway following the Railways Act 1921, and on 1 January 1948 the Southern Railway was itself nationalised to become the Southern Region of British Railways. On 24 April 1953 it was the scene of an accident when an axle of Merchant Navy Class 35020 Bibby Line broke while it was passing the station. This caused the platform canopy to be demolished.[1]

A new signal box was built in 1960 a little to the east of the old one, which was then demolished. In January 1963 all the lines in the area transferred to the Western Region and on 7 May 1967 the main line was rationalised.[1] The 21.5 miles (34.6 km) section between Sherborne and Chard Junction was reduced to just a single track,[1] although this has since been shortened to just 16.8 miles (27.0 km) between Yeovil Junction and Chard Junction, where there is a loop, followed by more single track to east of Axminster.[2]

Preceding station Historical railways Following station
Sutton Bingham   London and South Western Railway
London Waterloo to Devon and Cornwall
  Chard Junction

Description[edit]

The signal box built in 1960

The station is about a mile southeast of Crewkerne on the A356 road, which crosses the platform and railway on a bridge.[3] The entrance and platform are on the north side of the line, which is climbing westwards at 1 in 80 (1.25%) to the 206-yard (188 m) Crewkerne Tunnel.[1] The main building was designed by Sir William Tite and has been designated as a Grade II listed building.[4] North of the station is a builder's yard which is on the site of the old railway goods yard. The office (converted to a cafe in late-2013) by the main road was used to operate the weighbridge, and the old goods shed can be seen near the railway line. Between this and the platform is the disused signal box.[3]

Services[edit]

A train to Waterloo

The station is managed by South Western Railway[5] who operate an hourly service throughout most of the week between Exeter St Davids and London Waterloo station.[6]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Yeovil Junction   South Western Railway
West of England Main Line
  Axminster

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Phillips, Derek; Pryer, George (1997). The Salisbury to Exeter Line. Sparkford: Oxford Publishing Company. ISBN 0-86093-525-6.
  2. ^ Jacobs, Gerald (2005). Railway Track Diagrams Book 3: Western. Bradford-on-Avon: Trackmaps. ISBN 0-9549866-1-X.
  3. ^ a b Oakley, Mike (2006). Somerset Railway Stations. Bristol: Redcliffe Press. ISBN 1-904537-54-5.
  4. ^ "Crewkerne Railway Station". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 30 January 2009.
  5. ^ "Station Facilities: Crewkerne (CKN)". National Rail Enquiries. Retrieved 2 April 2009.
  6. ^ Table 160 National Rail timetable, May 2016