Crime in Bolivia

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Bolivian police in La Paz.

Crime in Bolivia is investigated by the Bolivian police.

Crime by type[edit]

Murder[edit]

In 2012, Bolivia had a murder rate of 12.1 per 100,000 population.[1] There were a total of 1,270 murders in Bolivia in 2012.[1]

Illegal drug trade[edit]

The Bolivian government has since 2004 implemented a policy of voluntary participation of farmers from all coca-growing regions in Bolivia. For instance, farmers in Chapare are allowed to grow one cato of coca per year.[2] Any coca grown beyond that limit, or any cultivation outside of approved coca-cultivation regions such as Chapare, is subject to elimination. The strategy relies on coca growers federations’ ability to enforce the agreement. Such federations are influential, and penalties for violations by farmers or lax enforcement by federations can be stern (including seizure of lands). As a result, coca cultivation in Bolivia fell to 27,200 hectares in 2011 from 31,000 hectares in 2010 - a 12 per cent decrease.[2]

Domestic violence[edit]

Domestic violence is a serious and underreported problem.[3] According to the Center for the Women’s Information and Development (CIDEM) and Emancipation Fund study, the number of reported domestic violence cases increased by 37% between 2007 and 2011.[4] A study by the Pan American Health Organization conducted in 12 Latin American countries found the highest prevalence of domestic violence against women to be in Bolivia.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Global Study on Homicide. United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, 2013.
  2. ^ a b Ledebur, K.; Youngers, C. (2013). "From Conflict to Collaboration: An Innovative Approach to Reducing Coca Cultivation in Bolivia". Stability: International Journal of Security and Development. 2 (1): 9. doi:10.5334/sta.aw.
  3. ^ "Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2016". www.state.gov. Retrieved 2018-02-24.
  4. ^ "Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2016". www.state.gov. Retrieved 2018-02-24.
  5. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-02-17. Retrieved 2015-06-15.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)