Cris Ericson

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Cris Ericson (born May 16, 1952) is an American marijuana legalization activist and frequent candidate for public office in Vermont who became known nationally for her appearance in a 2012 United States Senate debate that was broadcast on C-SPAN and for wearing an "extraordinary" hat, according to Time magazine, in a 2014 Vermont gubernatorial debate.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7]

Ericson is famous for often running in two races at the same time.[8]

Political career[edit]

Cris Ericson ran independently for Governor of Vermont, in 2002, as a Make Marijuana Legal candidate.[9]

In 2004, Ericson ran for Vermont governor and U.S. senator as a Marijuana Party candidate.[10][11]

Ericson went on to compete in 2006, 2008, and 2014, for multiple state and federal offices as an Independent candidate.[1][8]

Ericson was a U.S. Marijuana Party candidate for U.S. Senator and Governor of Vermont in 2010, 2012, and 2016.[12][13][14][15][16]

Ericson was a candidate for U.S. Representative and Governor of Vermont as an Independent, in 2018.

Results in Vermont state elections[edit]

Year Office Party Popular Votes Percentage
2002 VT Governor Make Marijuana Legal 1,737 0.8%[9]
2004 VT Governor Marijuana 4,221 1.4%[11]
2006 VT Governor Independent 2,477 0.9%[17]
2008 VT Governor Independent 1,704 0.5%[18]
2010 VT Governor U.S. Marijuana 1,819 0.8%%[19]
2012 VT Governor U.S. Marijuana 5,580 1.9%[20]
2014 VT Governor Independent 1,089 0.6%[21]
2018 VT Governor Independent 2,129 0.77%

Results in federal elections[edit]

Year Office Party Popular Votes Percentage
2004 US Senator Marijuana 6,486 2.1%[11]
2006 US Senator Independent 1,735 0.7%[17]
2008 US Representative Independent 7,841 2.6%[18]
2010 US Senator U.S. Marijuana 2,731 1.2%[19]
2012 US Senator U.S. Marijuana 5,919 2.0%[20]
2014 US Representative Independent 2,750 1.4%[21]
2016 US Senator United States Marijuana 9,156 2.9%[22]
2018 US Representative Independent 9,110 3.27%

2006 Republican primary[edit]

Ericson was a candidate in the 2006 Republican Party U.S. Senate primary. She got 1,722 votes.[23]

2016 Democratic primaries[edit]

In 2016, as a candidate in the U.S. Senate Democratic Party primary, Ericson received 7,596 votes (10.8%). In the 2016 Democratic Party gubernatorial primary Ericson got 537 votes.[24][25][26][27]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "attended the Vermont Gubernatorial debate yesterday - it looked like an SNL skit". REBRN. October 10, 2014.
  2. ^ Walker, Hunter (October 14, 2014). "Vermont's Gubernatorial Debate Was Very, Very Special". Business Insider.
  3. ^ Kaczynski, Andrew (October 14, 2014). "7 Reasons The Vermont Governor's Debate Was One Of The Strangest Debates This Year". BuzzFeed.
  4. ^ Nicks, Denver (October 15, 2014). "America Needs More Crazy Debates Like In Vermont". Time.
  5. ^ "Funny On Fox Nation: Vermont Governor Debate The Kookiest Loons Ever On Stage". Fox Nation. October 22, 2014.
  6. ^ Joseph, Dan (October 24, 2014). "Watch the Wackiest Political Debate You Will Ever See". CNSNews.com.
  7. ^ Cadei, Emily (August 28, 2015). "The Debate About Presidential Debates". Newsweek.
  8. ^ a b Fuller, Jaime (August 26, 2014). "Where can you run for two offices at once? Vermont, of course". The Washington Post.
  9. ^ a b Secretary of State of Vermont (2002). "Election Results Archive: 2002 Governor General Election". Vermont Elections Database.
  10. ^ "Vermont really is progressive (this is a real absentee ballot)". CollegeHumor. November 2, 2004.
  11. ^ a b c Secretary of State of Vermont (2004). "Election Results Archive: 2004 General Election". Vermont Elections Database.
  12. ^ Franklin, Terry (October 5, 2010). "Pro-Cannabis Candidates in the Northeast". Shadow Proof.
  13. ^ Schilling, Chelsea (December 26, 2011). "Finally! The untold facts on all Senate candidates, Page 3: Here's an in-depth look at 33 seats up for grabs – and who's grabbing". WorldNetDaily.
  14. ^ Harrington, Eli (July 27, 2016). "Beyond The Burn: An Interview With David Zuckerman". Heady Vermont.
  15. ^ Zoom, Doktor (October 9, 2016). "Nail-Biter Races In Idaho, Vermont, Just Kidding. Your Senate Sunday Is Close To Its End!". Wonkette.
  16. ^ Heintz, Paul (October 28, 2016). "At Vermont PBS Debate, Leahy Pans Milne Term Limit Proposal". Seven Days.
  17. ^ a b Secretary of State of Vermont (2006). "Election Results Archive: 2006 General Election". Vermont Elections Database.
  18. ^ a b Secretary of State of Vermont (2008). "Election Results Archive: 2008 General Election". Vermont Elections Database.
  19. ^ a b Secretary of State of Vermont (2010). "Election Results Archive: 2010 General Election". Vermont Elections Database.
  20. ^ a b Secretary of State of Vermont (2012). "Election Results Archive: 2012 General Election". Vermont Elections Database.
  21. ^ a b Secretary of State of Vermont (2014). "Election Results Archive: 2014 General Election". Vermont Elections Database.
  22. ^ Secretary of State of Vermont (2016). "Election Results Archive: 2016 General Election". Vermont Elections Database.
  23. ^ "The Caucus: Vermont". The New York Times. September 12, 2006.
  24. ^ Johnson, Mark (July 27, 2016). "Poll: Scott still best-known, but Minter as well-liked". Vermont Digger.
  25. ^ Wunderlich, Renee (August 3, 2016). "Democratic candidates for governor debate before Vermont primary: Matt Dunne, Cris Ericson, Peter Galbriath, Sue Minter, H. Brooke Page talk environmental issues". NBC5.
  26. ^ Bradley, Pat (August 5, 2016). "Vermont Democratic Gubernatorial Primary Candidates Discuss Campaigns". WAMC Northeast Public Radio.
  27. ^ Secretary of State of Vermont (2016). "Election Results Archive: 2016 Primary Election". Vermont Elections Database.

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