Cristoforo Guidalotti Ciocchi del Monte

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Cristoforo Guidalotti Ciocchi del Monte (1484–1564) was an Italian Roman Catholic bishop and cardinal.

Biography[edit]

Cristoforo Guidalotti Ciocchi del Monte was born in Arezzo in 1484, the son of Cecco di Cristofano Guidalotti, a patrician of Perugia, and Margherita Ciocchi del Monte.[1] On his mother's side, he was a first cousin of Pope Julius III.[1]

As a young man, he traveled to Rome and studied under his uncle Cardinal Antonio Maria Ciocchi del Monte, becoming a doctor of both laws.[1] Through a preferment from his uncle, he became archpriest of Sant'Angelo in Vado.[1]

On 21 August 1517 he was elected titular Bishop of Bethlehem, a position previously held by his cousin Gaspare Antonio del Monte.[1] He was transferred to the Diocese of Cagli e Pergola on 10 February 1525, and later to the Diocese of Marseille on 27 June 1550.[1] On 20 October 1550 he became titular Patriarch of Alexandria, while retaining the Diocese of Marseille.[1] He resigned the patriarchate sometime before 8 January 1552.[1]

His cousin Pope Julius III made him a cardinal priest in the consistory of 20 November 1551.[1] He received the red hat and the titular church of Santa Prassede on 4 December 1551.[1]

As cardinal, he was a participant in both the papal conclave of April 1555 that elected Pope Marcellus II and the papal conclave of May 1555 that elected Pope Paul IV.[1] He was transferred from the Diocese of Marseille back to the Diocese of Cagli on 9 March 1556.[1] He participated in the papal conclave of 1559 that elected Pope Pius IV.[1]

He died in Sant'Angelo in Vado on 27 October 1564.[1] He was buried in the main church in Sant'Angelo in Vado.[1]

References[edit]

External links and additional sources[edit]

  • Cheney, David M. "Diocese of Cagli e Pergola". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. Retrieved March 25, 2018.self-published
  • Chow, Gabriel. "Diocese of Cagli". GCatholic.org. Retrieved March 25, 2018.self-published