Cross moline

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A cross moline

The cross moline (also cross anchory, French croix ancrée "anchor cross") is a form of heraldic cross.


The name derives from its shape, which resembles a millrind, moline being the Old French for a mill, the iron clamp of the upper millstone. It is very similar to one of the varieties of the "fer de moline" heraldic charge (literal French: "iron of a mill"), the forked tips of which however circle out slightly more, akin to the "cross recercelee". It is borne both inverted and rebated, and sometimes "saltirewise" (i.e. in the form of a saltire). When used as a mark of cadency it signifies an eighth son.[citation needed]

The cross moline is associated with St. Benedict of Nursia. As a result, it is widely used as an emblem by the monks and nuns of the Order of St. Benedict, which he founded.[1]


Crosses moline can be seen in the bearings of:

family arms:


Modern municipal coats of arms:


  1. ^ Bayne, William Wilfrid OSB ChLJ, Dom. "An American Benedictine Armorial: Part One". Order of St. Benedict. 


Further reading[edit]