Crossroads School (Santa Monica, California)

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Crossroads School for Arts and Sciences
Large photo31791 151309.jpeg
Address
1714 21st Street

,
California
Coordinates34°01′28″N 118°28′26″W / 34.02444°N 118.47389°W / 34.02444; -118.47389Coordinates: 34°01′28″N 118°28′26″W / 34.02444°N 118.47389°W / 34.02444; -118.47389
Information
Opened1971
FounderPaul Cummins, Rhoda Makoff
Head of schoolBob Riddle
GradesK-12
Number of students1,139
School color(s)Red, White, and Blue
MascotRoadrunner
PublicationKollektiv (academic journal), Dark as Day (literary arts journal)
NewspaperCrossfire
YearbookCrossroads Yearbook
Website

Crossroads School for Arts & Sciences is a private, K-12, independent, college preparatory school in Santa Monica, California, United States. The school is a former member of the G20 Schools Group.

History[edit]

The school was founded in 1971 as a secular institution affiliated with St. Augustine By-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Santa Monica.[1] Although the founders, and many of the school's original students, came from the former St. Augustine By-the-Sea Episcopal Day School in Santa Monica, Crossroads School has always been a secular institution. Crossroads started with three rooms in a Baptist church offering grades seven and eight, and an initial enrollment of just over 30 students.[1] The name Crossroads was suggested by Robert Frost’s poem, "The Road Not Taken”, in which Frost writes:

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, and I,

I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference.[2]

As St. Augustine's grew to junior and senior high school, the founders started Crossroads with a separate board of directors and separate campus, which eventually merged in the 1980s under the name Crossroads.

In the media[edit]

The 2004 book Hollywood Interrupted, by Andrew Breitbart and Mark Ebner (ISBN 0-471-45051-0), dedicated a large section to Crossroads; it depicted the school (and the celebrities who send their children there) in a negative light, focusing mainly on a handful of high-profile parents and "drug problems" stemming from the 1980s.[1] The school was also featured in a May 2005 issue of Vanity Fair; like Breitbart's book, it also focused on the school's celebrity clientele.[1]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]