Crowcombe Court

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Crowcombe Court
Crowcombe Court.jpg
Crowcombe Court is located in Somerset
Crowcombe Court
Location within Somerset
General information
Town or city Crowcombe
Country England
Coordinates 51°07′30″N 3°13′50″W / 51.1250°N 3.2305°W / 51.1250; -3.2305Coordinates: 51°07′30″N 3°13′50″W / 51.1250°N 3.2305°W / 51.1250; -3.2305
Completed 1739

Crowcombe Court in Crowcombe, Somerset, England is a large country house dating from 1724–39. It is Grade I listed.[1]

It was built, in English regional baroque style,[2] by Thomas Parker, for Thomas Carew,[3] and finished by Nathaniel Ireson of Wincanton, after Carew found that Parker had taken old coins, found while demolishing the old house.[4] Minor alterations were carried out by Edward Middleton Barry around 1870.[1]

The house has amber coloured bricks complemented by Bath stone pilasters and frontispiece.[5] The interior includes plasterwork by Grinling Gibbons.[6] The house was described by Nikolaus Pevsner as "the finest house of its date in Somerset south of the Bath area".[7][8]

It has previously been used as a nursing home and today the Court is hired out for weddings and other functions.[3]

The new owners of the house David and Kate Kenyon purchased the property in 2011. Kate is a direct descendant of James Morrison.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Crowcombe Court and attached stables to west". Images of England. Retrieved 17 November 2007. 
  2. ^ "History of Crowcombe Court". Crowcombe Court. Retrieved 23 September 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Crowcombe". Quantock Online. Retrieved 17 November 2007. 
  4. ^ Binney, Marcus (15 August 2008). "Crowcombe Court in Somerset". Historic homes for sale (London: The Times). Retrieved 12 April 2009. 
  5. ^ "Crowcombe Court". Crowcombe Court. Retrieved 23 September 2011. 
  6. ^ Binney, Marcus (15 August 2008). "Historic homes for sale: Crowcombe Court in Somerset". The Times (London). Retrieved 23 September 2011. 
  7. ^ "Crowcombe Court". Historic Houses Association. Retrieved 23 September 2011. 
  8. ^ "Crowcombe Court". Stately-Homes. Retrieved 23 September 2011.