Croy railway station

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Croy National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Crothaidh[1]
Croy3.jpg
Looking south east at the Glasgow-bound platform
Location
PlaceCroy
Local authorityNorth Lanarkshire
Coordinates55°57′20″N 4°02′11″W / 55.9555°N 4.0365°W / 55.9555; -4.0365Coordinates: 55°57′20″N 4°02′11″W / 55.9555°N 4.0365°W / 55.9555; -4.0365
Grid referenceNS729754
Operations
Station codeCRO
Managed byAbellio ScotRail
Number of platforms2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2013/14Increase 1.239 million
2014/15Increase 1.342 million
2015/16Decrease 1.302 million
2016/17Increase 1.306 million
2017/18Increase 1.416 million
History
Original companyEdinburgh and Glasgow Railway
Pre-groupingNorth British Railway
Post-groupingLondon and North Eastern Railway
21 February 1842Opened[2]
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Croy from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

Croy railway station serves the village of Croy – as well as the nearby town of Kilsyth and parts of Cumbernauld – in North Lanarkshire, Scotland. Located on the Glasgow to Edinburgh via Falkirk Line, 11 12 miles (18.5 km) northeast of Glasgow Queen Street. It is served by services on the Glasgow–Edinburgh mainline and services between Glasgow Queen Street and Stirling. Train services are provided by Abellio ScotRail.

Facilities[edit]

The Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway station building has been demolished and replaced with a modern, glass and steel building designed by IDP Architects[3] similar in design to that at Bishopbriggs.

The station has park-and-ride facilities, with spaces for over 900 vehicles, including charging points for electrica vehicles. There are bus connections to Kilsyth and Cumbernauld. The lines through the station have been electrified as part of the Edinburgh to Glasgow Improvement Programme. Platform lengthening work has been carried out as part of this scheme. The station has cycle parking

Services[edit]

2011[edit]

Monday to Saturdays, there is a half-hourly service southbound to Glasgow Queen Street and northbound to Edinburgh. The service is hourly in each direction on evenings and Sundays.

There is also a half-hourly service to Stirling Monday to Saturday, which continues alternately to Alloa or Dunblane. This provides a second half-hourly service to Glasgow calling at both Lenzie and Bishopbriggs, giving a combined four trains an hour to Glasgow off peak. On Sundays, an hourly service operates between Glasgow and Alloa.

2016[edit]

Half-hourly to Queen Street (express) and Edinburgh on the E&G main line in the daytime, and hourly in the evenings and on Sundays.[4] Half-hourly (local) service each way on the Croy Line to Queen Street and to Stirling, then alternating to either Dunblane or Alloa. Hourly to Queen Street and Alloa on Sundays.[5]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Lenzie   Abellio ScotRail
Glasgow - Edinburgh Line
  Falkirk High
Lenzie   Abellio ScotRail
Croy Line
  Larbert
  Historical railways  
Lenzie
Line open; Station open
  Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway
North British Railway
  Dullatur
Line open; Station closed

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Brailsford 2017, Gaelic/English Station Index.
  2. ^ Butt 1995, p. 73.
  3. ^ "Croy station". IDP Architects. IDP Architects. Retrieved 25 March 2019.
  4. ^ GB National Rail Timetable May 2016, Table 228
  5. ^ GB National Rail Timetable May 2016, Table 230

Sources[edit]

  • Brailsford, Martyn, ed. (December 2017) [1987]. Railway Track Diagrams 1: Scotland & Isle of Man (6th ed.). Frome: Trackmaps. ISBN 978-0-9549866-9-8.
  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-508-7. OCLC 60251199.
  • Jowett, Alan (March 1989). Jowett's Railway Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland: From Pre-Grouping to the Present Day (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-086-0. OCLC 22311137.