Cry (Faith Hill album)

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Cry
Faith Hill - Cry.jpg
Studio album by Faith Hill
Released October 15, 2002 (2002-10-15)
Genre Country pop
Length 60:30
Label Warner Bros. Nashville
Producer
Faith Hill chronology
There You'll Be
(2001)
Cry
(2002)
Fireflies
(2005)
Singles from Cry
  1. "Cry"
    Released: September 30, 2002
  2. "When the Lights Go Down"
    Released: November 19, 2002
  3. "One"
    Released: April 2003
  4. "Baby You Belong"
    Released: March 4, 2003
  5. "You're Still Here"
    Released: June 10, 2003
Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
Source Rating
Metacritic (59/100)[1]
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3/5 stars[2]
Billboard (average)[3]
Blender 4/5 stars[1]
E! Online B+[1]
Entertainment Weekly B[4]
Los Angeles Times 1.5/4 stars[5]
Mojo 1.5/5 stars[1]
Q 3/5 stars[1]
Rolling Stone 2/5 stars[6]
The Village Voice C[7]

Cry is the fifth studio album by American country music singer Faith Hill. It was released October 15, 2002, via Warner Bros. Nashville and sold 472,486 copies in its first week, a career best for Hill. The album was intended as a crossover project for her, and although three of its singles were released to country radio, none reached the top ten. The title track and "One" were both adult contemporary hits, however, with the former spending 11 weeks at number one.

Upon release, Cry was met with mixed reviews, with critics divided on the lack of country influences.[1][8] The album went on to sell 4 million copies worldwide and has been certified 2× Platinum by the RIAA. Hill has defended the polarizing creative direction of Cry, telling Billboard that "it was definitely a different record," but that she is still "so proud of [the album]."[9] Cry ranked at #179 on the Billboard Top 200 albums of the decade 2000–09.

Content[edit]

Cry is led off by its title track, written by Angie Aparo. This song reached #12 on the country singles charts, the lowest country peak she has achieved with a lead-off single. "When the Lights Go Down" and "You're Still Here" were also released to country radio, peaking at #26 and #28 respectively.[9] "One" was not released to country radio, although it was a #7 adult contemporary hit. "Baby You Belong" was only released as a single in Japan, but was used as the theme song for the 2002 film Lilo and Stitch. The song's music video features clips from the film. The album was produced primarily by Byron Gallimore and Dann Huff, who also worked on 1999's Breathe,[10] with additional production from Hill and Marti Frederiksen.[2]

Critical reception[edit]

Cry received mixed reviews from music critics. At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the album received an average score of 59, based on 8 reviews.[1] Chris Willman of Entertainment Weekly praised Hill for taking stylistic risks but conceded that the album "invites some of the criticism that will inevitably come its way."[4] Billboard wrote that "Cry is a confident effort, with Hill laying claim as queen of" pop-country, however the magazine also described the songs as "sometimes bland" and "repetitive."[3] AllMusic writer Robert L. Doerschuk was ambivalent towards the album's production, writing that "her established skills as a song interpreter are lost in all this sturm und drang and her voice, while undeniably powerful at its peak, doesn't have the range that allows most singers in this style... to at least milk the material."[2]

Rolling Stone found the album to be "contrived" and impersonal, with Barry Walters writing, "[Hill is] an expert in the yelps and sighs that signify pop passion, and what she lacks in personality she makes up for with power, professionalism and unfailing hooks."[6] Robert Hillburn of the Los Angeles Times was particularly critical, rating the album one-and-a-half stars out of four. "The songs ... are mediocre," he writes, "her vocals are rarely convincing, and the arrangements are ham-fisted."[5]

In a piece commemorating Cry's tenth anniversary, Billy Dukes of Taste of Country theorized that the polarizing opinions on the album were a result of the "building tension" at the time between country "purists" and fans of the contemporary pop influences.[8]

Commercial performance[edit]

Cry debuted at number one on both the Billboard Top Country Albums chart and the all-genre Billboard 200 chart dated November 2, 2002. The album sold over 472,000 copies in its first week, marking a career high sales week for Hill and also setting a new record for the largest first-week sales figure by a solo female country artist since Nielsen SoundScan began tracking sales in 1991.[11] It spent three non-consecutive weeks at the top position on the former.

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "Free" Annie Roboff, Beth Nielsen Chapman 4:38
2. "Cry" Angie Aparo 3:45
3. "One" Roboff, Bekka Bramlett, Billy Burnette 5:20
4. "When the Lights Go Down" Rivers Rutherford, Jeffrey Steele, Craig Wiseman 4:05
5. "Beautiful" Chris Lindsey, Aimee Mayo, Shaye Smith 4:41
6. "Unsaveable" Bramlett, Bobby Terry 3:51
7. "Baby You Belong" Keith Follesé, Wade Kirby, Bill Luther 4:08
8. "If You're Gonna Fly Away" Alecia Moore, Linda Perry 3:48
9. "Stronger" Hillary Lindsey, Troy Verges 4:13
10. "If This Is the End" Steve McEwan 4:55
11. "This Is Me" H. Lindsey, Verges 5:04
12. "Back to You" Derek Bramble, Lindy Robbins 4:35
13. "I Think I Will" Steve Robson, Anthony Smith 4:08
14. "You're Still Here" Matraca Berg, Aimee Mayo 3:19
15. "Wicked" (Japanese bonus track) McEwan 4:04
Total length: 60:30

Personnel[edit]

Performance credits
  • Faith Hill – vocals
  • Greg Barnhill – background vocals
  • Bekka Bramlett – background vocals
  • Lisa Cochran – background vocals
  • Marti Frederiksen – background vocals
  • Lisa Gregg – background vocals
  • Chris Rodriguez – background vocals
  • Edmund Stein – vocals
  • Crystal Taliefero – background vocals
Music credits
  • Tim Akers – keyboard
  • Rick Baptist – trumpet
  • Bob Becker – viola
  • Charlie Bisharatviolin
  • Bekka Bramlett – tambourine
  • Denyse Buffum – viola
  • Paul Bushnell – bass
  • Eve Butler – violin
  • David Campbell – arranger, conductor
  • Darius Campo – violin
  • Matt Chamberlaindrums
  • Susan Chatman – violin
  • Jeff Cobble* – lead guitar
  • Vinnie Colaiuta – drums, tambourine
  • Larry Corbett – cello
  • Jim Cox – piano, Hammond organ
  • Eric Darken – percussion
  • Mario deLeon – violin
  • Joel Derouin – violin, concert master
  • Erika Duke – cello
  • Bruce Dukov – violin
  • Earl Dumler – oboe
  • Stephen Erdody – cello
  • Stefanie Fife – cello
  • Marti Frederiksen – acoustic guitar, percussion, electric guitar
  • John Fumo – trumpet
  • Matt Funes – viola
  • Byron Gallimore – electric guitar, clavinet, sampling, slide guitar, drum loop, sampled keyboards, synthesizer accordion
  • Armen Garabedian – violin
  • Berj Garabedian – violin
  • Endre Granat – violin
  • Lynn Grants – viola
  • Maurice Grants – cello
  • John Hayhurst – viola
  • Dan Higgins – tenor saxophone
  • Jim Hoke – autoharp
  • Jim Horn – tenor saxophone
  • Dann Huff – guitar
  • Damon Johnson – acoustic guitar, electric guitar, slide guitar
  • Suzie Katayama – cello, conductor, string conductor
  • Peter Kent – violin
  • Michael Landau – acoustic guitar, electric guitar
  • Sam Levine – tenor saxophone
  • Dane Little – cello
  • Diane Little – cello
  • Erik Lutkins – drum loop
  • Michael Markman – violin
  • Miguel Martinez – cello
  • Robert Matsuda – violin
  • Chris McHugh – drums
  • Jerry McPherson – guitar
  • Doug Moffett – baritone saxophone
  • Jamie Muhoberacorgan, keyboard, Wurlitzer
  • Carole Mukogawa – viola
  • Steve Nathan – keyboard
  • Maria Newman – violin
  • Sid Page – violin
  • Toss Panos – drums
  • Sara Parkins – violin
  • Dean Parks – acoustic guitar, gut string guitar
  • Joel Peskin – baritone saxophone
  • Bob Peterson – violin
  • Tim Pierce – acoustic guitar, electric guitar
  • Kazi Pitelka – viola
  • Karie Prescott – viola
  • Bill Reichenbach Jr.- trombone
  • Michele Richards – violin
  • Steve Richards – cello
  • Mark Robertson – violin
  • Annie Roboff – drum loop
  • Matt Rollings – piano
  • Haim Shtrum – violin
  • Leland Sklar – bass
  • Jimmie Lee Sloas – bass
  • Dan Smith – cello
  • Rudy Stein – cello
  • David Stenske – violin
  • Michael Hart Thompson – guitar
  • Mari Tsumura – violin
  • Josephina Vergara – violin
  • Evan Wilson – viola
  • John Wittenberg – violin
  • Margaret Wooten – violin
  • Cynthia Wyatt – harp
  • Jonathan Yudkin – mandolin, cello, bazouki
Production credits
  • Producer: Faith Hill, Marti Frederiksen, Byron Gallimore, Dann Huff, David May
  • Engineers: Jeff Balding, Jeremy Blair, Steve Churchyard, Ricky Cobble, Dennis Davis, Allen Ditto, Jason Gantt, Mark Hagen, Julian King, Erik Lutkins, Michael McCoy, Brian Paturalski
  • Mixing: Serban Ghenea, Mick Guzauski, Tom Lord-Alge, Mark O'Donoughue, Tim Palmer, Andy Wallace
  • Mixing assistant: Tim Roberts
  • Remixing: Elliot Scheiner
  • Mastering: Robert Hadley, Tom Lord-Alge, Bob Ludwig, Doug Sax
  • A&R: Jeffrey Aldrich, Danny Kee
  • Assistants: Jeff Balding, Tom Bender, Greg Burns, Eric Gallimore, Jed Hackett, Femio Hernández, Judy Kirschner, Brett Patrick, Dennis Rivadeneira, Tim Roberts, Jaime Sickora, Steve Sisco, Matt Snedecor, Dann Thompson, Alex Uychocde, Patrick Woodward, Mike Zinczenko
  • Digital editing: Ricky Cobble, Dennis Davis, Marti Frederiksen, Jason Gantt, Erik Lutkins, Chris Rowe, Josh Wilbur
  • Authoring: Spencer Chrislu, David Dieckmann
  • Production coordination: Ann Callis, Mike "Frog" Griffith
  • Drum programming: Vinnie Colaiuta, Frank Macek
  • Keyboard programming: Eric Carter
  • Programming: Dann Huff, David Lyndon Huff, Chris McHugh, Tedd Tjornhom
  • Overdubs: Byron Gallimore
  • Sequencing: Byron Gallimore
  • String arrangements: Paul Buckmaster, David Campbell, Jim Cox
  • Orchestra manager: Suzie Katayama
Visual and imagery
  • Art administration: Sandra Westerman
  • Graphic coordinator: Raena Winscott
  • Librarian: David Horn
  • Hair stylist: Serge Normant

Charts[edit]

Preceded by
ELV1S: 30#1 Hits by Elvis Presley
Billboard 200 number-one album
November 2–9, 2002
Succeeded by
Shaman by Santana
Preceded by
ELV1S: 30#1 Hits by Elvis Presley
Melt by Rascal Flatts
Top Country Albums number-one album
November 2–15, 2002
November 23–29, 2002
Succeeded by
Melt by Rascal Flatts
Home by Dixie Chicks

Certifications and sales[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Australia (ARIA)[34] Gold 35,000^
Canada (Music Canada)[35] Platinum 80,000^
United States (RIAA)[36] 2× Platinum 2,000,000^

*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

Awards[edit]

Grammy Awards

Year Winner Category
2002 "Cry" Best Female Country Vocal Performance

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Critic reviews for Cry". Metacritic. Retrieved December 23, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c Robert L. Doerschuk. "Cry – Faith Hill". Allmusic. All Media Network. Retrieved February 11, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Faith Hill: Cry". Billboard. October 26, 2002. Archived from the original on October 19, 2002. Retrieved December 23, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Willman, Chris (October 18, 2002). "Cry Review". Entertainment Weekly. Wenner Media. Retrieved December 23, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b Hilburn, Robert (October 13, 2002). "Nice try, Faith, but go back to the studio". Los Angeles Times. tronc. Retrieved December 23, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b Walters, Barry (October 8, 2002). "Faith Hill: Cry : Music Reviews". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media. Archived from the original on July 26, 2008. Retrieved December 23, 2012. 
  7. ^ Christgau, Robert (April 22, 2003). "Not Hop, Stomp". The Village Voice. New York. Archived from the original on February 9, 2013. Retrieved February 9, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b Dukes, Billy (October 15, 2012). "Faith Hill's 'Cry' Turns 10". Taste of Country. Townsquare Media. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Billboard (Vol. 117, No. 30 ed.). Prometheus Global Media. July 23, 2005. p. 26. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Faith Hill Has A Good 'Cry'". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. August 9, 2002. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  11. ^ Gilbert, Calvin (October 25, 2002). "Faith Hill's Cry Dominates Album Charts". CMT. Viacom. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Australiancharts.com – Faith Hill – Cry". Hung Medien. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  13. ^ "ARIA Report (Issue 660)" (PDF). ARIA. October 21, 2002. p. 18. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  14. ^ "Austriancharts.at – Faith Hill – Cry" (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  15. ^ "Faith Hill – Chart history" Billboard Canadian Albums Chart for Faith Hill. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  16. ^ "Danishcharts.com – Faith Hill – Cry". Hung Medien. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  17. ^ "Italiancharts.com – Faith Hill – Cry". Hung Medien. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  18. ^ "Charts.org.nz – Faith Hill – Cry". Hung Medien. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  19. ^ "Norwegiancharts.com – Faith Hill – Cry". Hung Medien. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  20. ^ "Portuguesecharts.com – Faith Hill – Cry". Hung Medien. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  21. ^ "Swedishcharts.com – Faith Hill – Cry". Hung Medien. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  22. ^ "Swisscharts.com – Faith Hill – Cry". Hung Medien. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  23. ^ "Faith Hill | Artist | Official Charts". UK Albums Chart Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  24. ^ "Official Country Artists Albums Chart Top 20". Official Charts Company. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  25. ^ "Faith Hill – Chart history" Billboard 200 for Faith Hill. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  26. ^ "Faith Hill – Chart history" Billboard Top Country Albums for Faith Hill. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  27. ^ "ARIA Report (Issue 670)" (PDF). ARIA. December 30, 2002. p. 18. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  28. ^ "Billboard 200 Albums: Year End 2002". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  29. ^ "Country Albums: Year End 2002". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  30. ^ "ARIA Report (End of Year 2003)" (PDF). ARIA. December 29, 2002. p. 19. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  31. ^ "Billboard 200 Albums: Year End 2003". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  32. ^ "Country Albums: Year End 2003". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  33. ^ Billboard (Vol. 121, No. 39 ed.). Prometheus Global Media. October 3, 2009. p. 164. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  34. ^ "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2002 Albums". Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  35. ^ "Canadian album certifications – Faith Hill – Cry". Music Canada. Retrieved December 4, 2016. 
  36. ^ "American album certifications – Faith Hill – Cry". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved December 4, 2016.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH

External links[edit]