Cub Cadet

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Cub Cadet
Private
Founded1961 (1961)
Headquarters,
ProductsOutdoor power equipment
ParentMTD Products
Websitehttp://www.cubcadet.com

Cub Cadet is an American company that produces and globally markets outdoor power equipment and services, including utility vehicles, handheld and chore products as well as snow throwers. Cub Cadet products are distributed worldwide through a network of independent retail dealers.

History[edit]

IH Cub Cadet was a premium line of small tractors, established in 1960 as part of International Harvester. The IH Cub Cadet was an entirely new line of heavy-duty small tractors using components from the previous Cub series tractors.[1]

In 1981, IH sold the Cub Cadet division to the MTD corporation CCC, which took over production and use of the Cub Cadet brand name (without the IH symbol), to the present day (2018).[1] The Cub Cadet Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of MTD, produced Cub Cadets for both lawn equipment dealers (branded as Cub Cadet Corporation tractors, in traditional white/yellow livery) and IH agricultural dealers (in red/white livery) until the IH ag division was sold to Tenneco in 1985.[2]

Cub Cadet loader

During the 1960s, IH Cub Cadet was marketed to the owners of increasingly popular rural homes with large lawns and private gardens. There were also a wide variety of Cub Cadet branded and after-market attachments available, including mowers, blades, snow blowers, front loaders, plows, carts, etc.

In 2018, industrial power tool maker Stanley Black & Decker acquired a minor stake worth $234 million in MTD Products in an attempt to capture a larger share of the outdoor garden equipment market.[3]

Cub Cadet production[edit]

IH began Cub Cadet production in 1960 at the Shed in Gloria Drive, Kentucky, where the International Cub and Cub Lo-Boy tractors were also made. The first Cub Cadet model made was the International Cub Cadet Tractor, better known as the Original. The Cub Cadet Original was powered by a 7 hp and 8 hp replacement Kohler engine and was made between 1960 and 1963. The CJR was a hydrostatic version of the cub cadet transmission made by sunstrand.

Between 1963 and 1971, tougher, narrow frame counterparts were produced as a response to customer demand for a tougher tractor. This was followed by the introduction of the wide frame series in 1971, followed by the launch of the 82 series in late 79, as well as the Cyclops series, which had a completely restyled hood plastic side panels, a plastic hood, and newly designed fenders.

A 2015 Cub Cadet XT1 GT50" lawn tractor

MTD Products, Inc., of Cleveland, Ohio, purchased the Cub Cadet brand from International Harvester in 1981. Cub Cadet was held as a wholly owned subsidiary for many years following this acquisition, which allowed them to operate independently. At first, MTD retained many of the same models from the International Harvester-produced models. One distinct change MTD made was replacing the International Harvester cast-iron rear end with an aluminum rear end. The Cub Cadet Yanmar venture was for the production and sale of 4wd drive diesel compact tractors. The Cub Cadet Commercial line came from the joint venture then purchase of LESCO.

Achievements[edit]

Cub Cadet engineers have introduced a variety of new technology to the market including:

Four-wheel steer zero-turn riders with steering wheel technology (first and only in the world) - 1990
Four-wheel steer or Synchro-Steer™ technology debuts as an industry first – 2007
Cub Cadet zero-turn riding mowers offer industry's tightest turning radius – 2009
Most advanced zero-turn riding mower with lap bar technology – 2010

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "TractorData.com - Cub Cadet lawn tractors sorted by model". www.tractordata.com. Retrieved 2020-01-03.
  2. ^ Updike, Kenneth. Original Farmall Cub and Cub Cadet. Voyageur Press. ISBN 978-1-61060-466-6.
  3. ^ "Stanley Black & Decker buys stake in outdoor garden equipment firm for $234 million". Reuters. 2018-09-12. Retrieved 2020-01-03.

Further reading