Cudighi

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Cudighi
Alternative names Gudighi
Type Sausage
Place of origin United States, Italy
Region or state Upper Peninsula of Michigan

Cudighi (/ˈkʊdəɡ/) is a spicy Italian sausage that can be bought in links or served as a sandwich on a long, hard roll, often with mozzarella cheese and tomato sauce. Although it originated in Italy, it is now primarily served in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan in the United States.

Preparation[edit]

Cudighi can be served many ways in many Italian dishes. As a sandwich, it was originally served with raw onions and mustard on a roll,[1] but is today typically served with mozzarella cheese and tomato sauce.[2] Additional toppings may include mushrooms, onions, and green peppers.[2]

The taste of Cudighi varies with the amount of clove and cinnamon present in the mix.

History[edit]

Cudighi originated in Northern Italy,[3] although it is now primarily served in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, particularly in Marquette County.[4] The sandwich and its distinctive sausage were first sold in northern Michigan by Italian immigrants in 1936, who called it Gudighi. The sandwich was originally dressed with mustard and onions; using tomato sauce and mozzarella cheese as toppings became popular following World War II.[5]

Cudighi seems to be derived from Cotechino,[citation needed] an old Lombard word for a fresh sausage made from pork, fatback, and pork rind.[6] The modern recipe for what is known as "Cudighi" is likely highly specific to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fowler, Brenda (June 29, 1997). "Endless Trails to Open Water". The New York Times. Retrieved April 30, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Himmelstein, Rebecca (October 31, 2014). "Cudighi Sandwich Remains Staple in the Yooper Diet". Upper Michigans Source. Negaunee, MI: WLUC-TV. Retrieved August 23, 2015. 
  3. ^ "Cudighi Sausage". Glossary of Kitchen and Food Terms. Hormel. Archived from the original on February 18, 2005. Retrieved May 30, 2009. 
  4. ^ "Cudighi Tradition Continues in Ishpeming". ABC 10 News. Ishpeming, MI: WBUP-TV. January 28, 2014. Retrieved August 23, 2015. 
  5. ^ Smith, Andrew F. (2013). The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, Volume 1 (2nd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 576. ISBN 0199734968. Retrieved August 23, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Cotechino di Modena". Ricettedi Magazine (in Italian). Archived from the original on February 24, 2012. Retrieved May 30, 2009.