Cultural depictions of Henry IV of England

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Henry IV of England has been depicted in popular culture a number of times.

Literature[edit]

Almost two hundred years after his death, Henry became the subject of two plays by William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 1 and Henry IV, Part 2, as well as featuring prominently in Richard II. As the Earl of Derby, he is also a character in Gordon Daviot's play Richard of Bordeaux. He is a supporting character in Georgette Heyer's 1975 historical novel My Lord John, which details the early life of his son, John of Lancaster.[1][2] Anya Seton included Henry in her 1954 novel Katherine which depicted the relationship between Henry's father John of Gaunt and his eventual step-mother Katherine Swynford. Henry is also a main character in Sara Douglass's The Crucible Trilogy, a work of historical fiction.

Film[edit]

Henry has been portrayed on screen by:

Television[edit]

Henry has been portrayed a number of times on television, mainly in versions of Shakespeare's plays. In this context he has been played by:

Henry has also been played on television by:

  • Ralph Truman in a BBC adaptation of Richard of Bordeaux (1938)
  • John Arnatt in another BBC adaptation of Richard of Bordeaux (1955)

Video[edit]

  • Henry was played by Barry Smith in a straight-to-video film adaptation of Shakespeare's Richard the Second (2001).
  • Paul Shenar played him in an American video Richard II (1982), in an Elizabethan style stage production of the play.

Naming[edit]

Henry IV of England has also influenced an increased precedence in the use of "Henry" as a first name. In fact, it was so popular as to top the Telegraph's list of most popular baby names in 2014.[3] Examples of the name in use include Prince Harry, whose given name is Henry, and Henry Fippinger.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Toomey, Philippa (October 1975). "Fiction". In Fahnestock-Thomas, Mary. Georgette Heyer: A Critical Retrospective. Prinnyworld Press (published 2001). pp. 240–241. ISBN 978-0-9668005-3-1. 
  2. ^ Stephenson, Geneva (November 1975). "Last Heyer Novel, A Period Panorama". In Fahnestock-Thomas, Mary. Georgette Heyer: A Critical Retrospective. Prinnyworld Press (published 2001). pp. 242–243. ISBN 978-0-9668005-3-1. 
  3. ^ "Henry dethrones William and George as most popular baby name for Telegraph readers". Retrieved 2015-06-05.