Cumberland—Colchester

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Cumberland—Colchester
Nova Scotia electoral district
Umberland colchester musquodobitvalley map.png
Cumberland–Colchester–Musquodoboit Valley in relation to the other Nova Scotia federal electoral districts
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Lenore Zann
Liberal
District created1966
First contested2004
Last contested2019
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2016)[1]80,590
Electors (2019)66,616
Area (km²)[1]7,906
Pop. density (per km²)10.2
Census divisionsColchester, Cumberland, Halifax
Census subdivisionsHalifax, Truro, Amherst, Springhill

Cumberland—Colchester (formerly Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley and North Nova) is a federal electoral district in Nova Scotia, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 2004.

Cumberland—Colchester North and Cumberland—Colchester were ridings that covered roughly the same geographic area and were represented in the House of Commons from 1968 to 1979 and 1979 to 2004, respectively.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
YearPop.±%
200187,149—    
200687,895+0.9%
2011 (2003 redist.)87,982+0.1%
2011 (2015 redist.)82,321−6.4%
201680,590−2.1%

From the 2006 census [2]

Ethnic groups:

Languages:

Religions:

Education:

  • No certificate, diploma or degree: 31.0%
  • High school certificate: 24.6%
  • Apprenticeship or trade certificate or diploma: 12.3%
  • Community college, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma: 17.7%
  • University certificate or diploma: 14.3%

Median Age:

  • 43.4

Median total income:

  • $20,756

Average total income:

  • $26,779

Median household income:

  • $41,550

Average household income:

  • $50,122

Median family income:

  • $50,353

Average family income:

  • $58,555

Unemployment:

  • 9.0%

Geography[edit]

The district includes the counties of Cumberland, and Colchester. Communities include the towns of Amherst, Oxford, Parrsboro, Springhill, Stewiacke and Truro, as well as the villages of Bible Hill, Pugwash and Tatamagouche.

History[edit]

This riding was created as "Cumberland—Colchester North" in 1966 from Cumberland and Colchester—Hants ridings. It consisted of the county of Cumberland and the northern part of the county of Colchester, including the town of Truro. It was abolished in 1976 when it was merged with the remainder of Colchester County into "Cumberland—Colchester" riding.

Cumberland–Colchester was abolished in 2003. The territory was combined with the largely rural Musquodoboit Valley portion of the Halifax Regional Municipality in a new riding called "North Nova". After the election in 2004, the name was changed to "Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley".

2009 By-election

In early 2009, Incumbent Bill Casey announced he would not be re-offering in the next Federal Election. He subsequently announced his resignation from Parliament to become the Senior Inter-Governmental Affairs Representative for Nova Scotia in Ottawa.

In April 2009 Scott Armstrong was confirmed as the next Conservative Party candidate in the riding. At the time, he was the president of the provincial Progressive Conservative Party.

In September 2009, Jim Burrows was selected as the next Liberal Party candidate in the riding having defeated 2008 candidate, Tracy Parsons. He received 175 of 206 votes cast. He is a dairy farmer from Green Oaks and Chair of the Board of Directors for Scotsburn Co-operative Services.[3]

Mark Austin was selected to run for the New Democratic Party.

Christian Heritage Party ran Jim Hnatiuk, a retired military officer and the owner of Nova Scotia's largest hunting and fishing store, in Lantz. Hnatiuk was chosen party leader in November 2008.

Green Party leader Elizabeth May had said she was interested in running in the by-election, but since announced she will run in the riding of Saanich-Gulf Islands. The party instead ran Jason Blanch.

As per the 2012 federal electoral redistribution, this riding was largely dissolved into the new riding 'Cumberland—Colchester', with small portions going to Central Nova and Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook.

Member of Parliament[edit]

These ridings have elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
Cumberland—Colchester North
Riding created from Cumberland and Colchester—Hants
28th  1968–1972     Robert Coates Progressive Conservative
29th  1972–1974
30th  1974–1979
Cumberland—Colchester
31st  1979–1980     Robert Coates Progressive Conservative
32nd  1980–1984
33rd  1984–1988
34th  1988–1993 Bill Casey
35th  1993–1997     Dianne Brushett Liberal
36th  1997–2000     Bill Casey Progressive Conservative
37th  2000–2003
 2003–2004     Conservative
North Nova
38th  2004–2006     Bill Casey Conservative
Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley
39th  2006–2007     Bill Casey Conservative
 2007–2008     Independent
40th  2008–2009
 2009–2011     Scott Armstrong Conservative
41st  2011–2015
Cumberland—Colchester
42nd  2015–2019     Bill Casey Liberal
43rd  2019–present Lenore Zann

Election results[edit]

Cumberland—Colchester[edit]

2019 general election[edit]

2019 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Lenore Zann 16,672 36.68 −27.05
Conservative Scott Armstrong 16,219 35.69 +9.23
Green Jason Blanch 6,015 13.23 +9.67
New Democratic Larry Duchesne 5,451 11.99 +6.28
People's William Archer 608 1.34 New
Independent Matthew V. Rushton 232 0.51 New
Veterans Coalition Jody O'Blenis 144 0.32 New
National Citizens Alliance Stephen J. Garvey 109 0.24 New
Total valid votes/Expense limit 45,450 100.0     $104,050.86
Total rejected ballots 447 0.97 +0.59
Turnout 45,897 68.90 −2.15
Eligible voters 66,616
Liberal hold Swing −18.14
Source: Elections Canada[4]

2015 general election[edit]

2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Bill Casey 29,527 63.73 +45.35 $94,835.51
Conservative Scott Armstrong 12,257 26.45 –26.48 $155,677.03
New Democratic Wendy Robinson 2,647 5.71 –16.76 $21,393.25
Green Jason Matthew Blanch 1,650 3.56 –1.81 $8,721.38
Independent Kenneth Jackson 181 0.39
Independent Richard Trueman Plett 70 0.15
Total valid votes/Expense limit 46,332 99.62   $207,024.53
Total rejected ballots 178 0.38
Turnout 46,510 71.64
Eligible voters 64,923
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +35.91
Source: Elections Canada[5][6]
2011 federal election redistributed results[7]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 19,875 52.93
  New Democratic 8,439 22.48
  Liberal 6,902 18.38
  Green 2,015 5.37
  Others 314 0.84

Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley[edit]

2011 general election[edit]

2011 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Scott Armstrong 21,041 52.46 +6.62 $84,480.51
New Democratic Wendy Robinson 9,322 23.24 -2.49 $10,734.51
Liberal Jim Burrows 7,264 18.11 -3.21 $34,804.26
Green Jason Blanch 2,109 5.26 +1.95 $5,762.34
Christian Heritage Jim Hnatiuk 375 0.93 -2.26 $5,478.83
Total valid votes/Expense limit 40,111 100.00   $87,350.74
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 256 0.63 +0.23
Turnout 40,367 58.34 +22.53
Eligible voters 69,188
Conservative hold Swing +4.56
Changes based on 2009 by-election results.
Sources:[8][9]

2009 by-election[edit]

Canadian federal by-election, November 9, 2009
On the resignation of Bill Casey, 11 September 2009
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Scott Armstrong 11,167 45.84 +37.01 $85,124.62
New Democratic Mark Austin 6,267 25.73 +13.41 $70,020.79
Liberal Jim Burrows 5,193 21.32 +12.87 $59,031.48
Green Jason Blanch 807 3.31 $3,338.63
Christian Heritage Jim Hnatiuk 778 3.19 $61,482.45
Independent Kate Graves 149 0.61 $1,108.02
Total valid votes/Expense limit 24,361 100.0     $86,242
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 97 0.40 -0.11
Turnout 24,458 35.81 -21.96
Eligible voters 68,304
Conservative gain from Independent Swing +11.80

2008 general election[edit]

Incumbent MP Bill Casey, re-elected in 2006 as a member of the Conservative Party, was expelled from the Conservative caucus in 2007 after voting against the 2007 budget, which he objected to on the grounds of alleged violations of the Atlantic Accord. He attempted to run for the Conservative nomination for the next federal election but was refused. Casey therefore ran for re-election as an independent. The Green Party endorsed Casey and did not nominate a candidate opposing his reelection.

2008 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Independent Bill Casey 27,303 69.01 +16.97 $68,549.58
New Democratic Karen Olsson 4,874 12.32 -8.42 $6,944.11
Conservative Joel Bernard 3,493 8.83 -43.21 $35,846.73
Liberal Tracy Parsons 3,344 8.45 -15.44 $28,266.26
Independent Rick Simpson 550 1.39 +0.17 none listed
Total valid votes/Expense limit 39,564 100.0     $84,518
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 201 0.51 +0.04
Turnout 39,765 57.77 -4.08
Eligible voters 68,831
Independent gain from Conservative Swing +12.68

2006 general election[edit]

2006 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Bill Casey 22,439 52.04 +1.55 $50,744.39
Liberal Gary Richard 10,299 23.89 -2.60 $30,783.20
New Democratic Margaret Sagar 8,944 20.74 +1.83 $15,901.38
Green Bruce Farrell 910 2.11 -1.00 $118.51
Independent Rick Simpson 524 1.22 $253.00
Total valid votes/Expense limit 43,116 100.0     $79,110
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 203 0.47 -0.01
Turnout 43,319 61.85
Eligible voters 70,036
Conservative hold Swing +2.08

North Nova[edit]

2004 general election[edit]

2004 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Bill Casey 20,188 50.49 -9.99 $63,528.46
Liberal Dianne Brushett 10,591 26.49 +0.13 $40,391.55
New Democratic Margaret Sagar 7,560 18.91 +5.87 $14,509.58
Green Sheila Richardson 1,245 3.11 $1,050.38
Progressive Canadian Jack Moors 399 1.00 $553.10
Total valid votes/Expense limit 39,983 100.0     $76,024
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 192 0.48
Turnout 40,175 60.46 -0.32
Eligible voters 66,451
Conservative notional gain from Progressive Conservative Swing -5.06
Changes from 2000 are based on redistributed results. Conservative Party change is based on the combination of Canadian Alliance and Progressive Conservative Party totals.
2000 federal election redistributed results
Party Vote %
  Progressive Conservative 18,984 47.38
  Liberal 10,563 26.36
  Alliance 5,247 13.10
  New Democratic 5,226 13.04
  Others 48 0.12

Cumberland—Colchester[edit]

2000 general election[edit]

2000 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Bill Casey 18,716 48.49 +4.86
Liberal Dianne Brushett 10,271 26.61 +0.82
Alliance Bryden Ryan 4,981 12.91 -1.08
New Democratic James Harpell 4,629 11.99 -2.21
Total valid votes 38,597 100.00
Changes for the Canadian Alliance from 1997 are based on its predecessor, the Reform Party.

1997 general election[edit]

1997 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Bill Casey 18,610 43.63 +7.15
Liberal Dianne Brushett 11,002 25.79 -16.80
New Democratic Peter Stewart 6,058 14.20 +8.64
Reform Bob Peterson 5,970 13.99 +0.80
Independent Ray Merriam 826 1.94
Natural Law Phyllis Hall 193 0.45 -0.28
Total valid votes 42,659 100.00

1993 general election[edit]

1993 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Dianne Brushett 18,195 42.59 +1.03
Progressive Conservative Bill Casey 15,582 36.48 -9.71
Reform Audrey Staples 5,636 13.19
New Democratic Barbara Jack 2,374 5.56 -3.76
Christian Heritage Steve McLean 618 1.45 -1.02
Natural Law Phyllis Hall 312 0.73
Total valid votes 42,717 100.00

1988 general election[edit]

1988 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Bill Casey 20,384 46.19 -11.10
Liberal Dennis James 18,340 41.56 +11.96
New Democratic Barbara Jack 4,112 9.32 -3.78
Christian Heritage Norman W. Pearce 1,088 2.47
Independent Bob Kirk 210 0.48
Total valid votes 44,134 100.00

1984 general election[edit]

1984 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Robert Coates 24,180 57.30 +11.00
Liberal Ron Creighton 12,489 29.60 -4.90
New Democratic Jessie Mae McCarron 5,527 13.10 -4.76
Total valid votes 42,196 100.00

1980 general election[edit]

1980 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Robert Coates 18,436 46.30 -9.46
Liberal Walter Purdy 13,737 34.50 +4.81
New Democratic Hayden Trenholm 7,111 17.86 +4.03
Independent Bob Kirk 337 0.85 +0.12
Independent Dean Whalen 194 0.49
Total valid votes 39,815 100.00

1979 general election[edit]

1979 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Robert Coates 22,827 55.76 +2.97
Liberal Sam Brushett 12,154 29.69 -10.22
New Democratic Hayden Trenholm 5,662 13.83 +6.91
Independent Bob Kirk 297 0.73
Total valid votes 40,940 100.00

Cumberland–Colchester North[edit]

1974 general election[edit]

1974 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Robert Coates 18,078 52.79 -5.29
Liberal Sam Brushett 13,666 39.91 +9.57
New Democratic Allan Marchbank 2,369 6.92 -3.93
Social Credit Beatrice Holmes 133 0.39
Total valid votes 34,246 100.00

1972 general election[edit]

1972 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Robert Coates 19,455 58.08 -2.84
Liberal Dick van Snick 10,163 30.34 -3.14
New Democratic Allan Marchbank 3,635 10.85 +5.25
Independent Robert Kirk 245 0.73
Total valid votes 33,498 100.00

1968 general election[edit]

1968 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive Conservative Robert Coates 18,446 60.92
Liberal Harry Flemming 10,139 33.48
New Democratic Gordon Schurman 1,696 5.60
Total valid votes 30,281 100.00

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • "(Code 12007) Census Profile". 2011 census. Statistics Canada. 2012. Retrieved 2011-03-03.

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]