Cumene hydroperoxide

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Cumene hydroperoxide[1]
Cumene Hydroperoxide.svg
Names
IUPAC name
2-hydroperoxypropan-2-ylbenzene
Other names
Cumyl Hydroperoxide
CHP
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.001.141
Properties
C9H12O2
Molar mass 152.19 g·mol−1
Appearance colorless to pale yellow liquid
Density 1.02 g/cm3
Melting point −9 °C (16 °F; 264 K)
Boiling point 153 °C (307 °F; 426 K)
1.5 g / 100 mL
Vapor pressure 14 mmHg at 20 °C
Hazards
Safety data sheet sigmaaldrich.com
GHS pictograms The flame pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) The corrosion pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) The skull-and-crossbones pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) The health hazard pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) The environment pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word DANGER
H242, H302, H312, H314, H331, H373, H411
P220, P261, P273, P280, P305+351+338, P310
NFPA 704
Flammability code 2: Must be moderately heated or exposed to relatively high ambient temperature before ignition can occur. Flash point between 38 and 93 °C (100 and 200 °F). E.g., diesel fuel Health code 1: Exposure would cause irritation but only minor residual injury. E.g., turpentine Reactivity code 4: Readily capable of detonation or explosive decomposition at normal temperatures and pressures. E.g., nitroglycerin Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Flash point 57 °C (135 °F; 330 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Cumene hydroperoxide is an organic hydroperoxide intermediate in the cumene process for developing phenol and acetone from benzene and propene. It is typically used as an oxidizing agent.[2] Products of decomposition of cumene hydroperoxide are methylstyrene, acetophenone, and cumyl alcohol.[3] Its formula is C6H5C(CH3)2OOH.

One of the key uses for the material is as a free radical initiator for acrylate and methacrylate monomers, and polyester resins.

Public safety[edit]

Cumene hydroperoxide[4] is believed to be one of the chemicals of concern[5] at the Arkema facility in Crosby, Texas in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

References[edit]

  1. ^ University, Safety Officer in Physical Chemistry at Oxford (2005). "Safety (MSDS) data for cumene hydroperoxide". Retrieved 2009-05-13. 
  2. ^ Richard J. Lewis, Richard J. Lewis (Sr.), Hazardous chemicals desk reference, Publisher Wiley-Interscience, 2008, ISBN 0-470-18024-2, ISBN 978-0-470-18024-2, 1953 pages (page 799)
  3. ^ Cumene Hydroperoxide at the Organic Chemistry Portal
  4. ^ "The Rachel Maddow Show". MSNBC. 30 August 2017. 
  5. ^ Bagg, Julia; Johnson, Alex; Cumming, Jason (31 August 2017). "Crosby, Texas, Chemical Plant Explodes Twice, Arkema Group Says". nbcnews.com. NBC News. Retrieved 31 August 2017. 

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]