Current asset

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In accounting, a current asset is any asset which can reasonably be expected to be sold, consumed, or exhausted through the normal operations of a business within the current fiscal year or operating cycle (whichever period is longer). Typical current assets include cash, cash equivalents, short-term investments (marketable securities), accounts receivable, stock inventory, supplies, and the portion of prepaid liabilities, sometimes referred to as prepaid expenses, which will be paid within a year.[1]

On a balance sheet, assets will typically be classified into current assets and long-term assets.[2]

The current ratio is calculated by dividing total current assets by total current liabilities. It is frequently used as an indicator of a company's liquidity, its ability to meet short-term obligations.

The quick ratio, or acid-test, measures the ability of a company to use its near cash or quick assets to extinguish or retire its current liabilities immediately. Quick assets are those that can be quickly turned into cash if necessary.

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. Downes, J.E. Goodman, "Dictionary of Finance & Investment Terms", Barons Financial Guides, 2003; and J. G. Siegel, N. Dauber & J. K. Shim, "The Vest Pocket CPA", Wiley, 2005.
  2. ^ Larry M. Walther, Christopher J. Skousen, "Long-Term Assets", Ventus Publishing ApS, 2009