Curtis McElhinney

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Curtis McElhinney
Curtis McElhinney (8443948370).jpg
McElhinney with the Springfield Falcons
Born (1983-05-23) May 23, 1983 (age 36)
London, Ontario, Canada
Height 6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Weight 200 lb (91 kg; 14 st 4 lb)
Position Goaltender
Catches Left
NHL team
Former teams
Tampa Bay Lightning
Calgary Flames
Anaheim Ducks
Ottawa Senators
Phoenix Coyotes
Columbus Blue Jackets
Toronto Maple Leafs
Carolina Hurricanes
National team  Canada
NHL Draft 176th overall, 2002
Calgary Flames
Playing career 2005–present

Robert Curtis McElhinney (born May 23, 1983) is a Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender who is currently playing with the Tampa Bay Lightning of the National Hockey League (NHL). He has also played for several other NHL teams, most recently with the Carolina Hurricanes as well as the Toronto Maple Leafs, Columbus Blue Jackets, Ottawa Senators, Phoenix Coyotes, Anaheim Ducks, and Calgary Flames.

McElhinney was a sixth-round selection of the Calgary Flames, 176th overall, at the 2002 NHL Entry Draft. McElhinney made his NHL debut in the 2007–08 season.

Playing career[edit]

Early Years[edit]

McElhinney played four years of university hockey for Colorado College, compiling a 62–15–8 record in that time en route to winning two Western Collegiate Hockey Association First All-Star Team selections in 2003 and 2005, as well as NCAA Second and First All-American Team selections in 2003 and 2005, respectively.[1] He was selected 176th overall by the Calgary Flames in the 2002 NHL Entry Draft.

He made his professional debut in 2005–06 with the Omaha Ak-Sar-Ben Knights of the American Hockey League (AHL). He tied for the AHL lead in shutouts in 2006–07 while setting an Omaha team record with 44 wins. He played in the 2007 AHL All-Star game,[2] and was named to the AHL Second All-Star Team.[1]

McElhinney split 2007–08 between the Quad City Flames and Calgary. He made his NHL debut on October 22, 2007 against the San Jose Sharks in relief of Miikka Kiprusoff,[2] appearing in five NHL games, finishing with a 0–2–0 record and a 2.00 goals against average.[1] He played the entire 2008–09 NHL season with Calgary as Kiprusoff's backup and recorded his first NHL win in his 14th game of the year, the last of the regular season, in a 4–1 victory over the Edmonton Oilers on April 11, 2009.[3]

McElhinney with the Calgary Flames during the 2009–10 season. He was drafted by the Flames in 2002.

The Flames signed McElhinney to a two-year contract prior to the 2009–10 season.[4] He was traded to the Anaheim Ducks on March 3, 2010 in exchange for goalie Vesa Toskala.

On February 24, 2011 McElhinney was traded to the Tampa Bay Lightning for Dan Ellis. On February 28, he was claimed off waivers by the Ottawa Senators.

McElhinney signed a one-year, two-way contract with the Phoenix Coyotes on July 4, 2011.[5]

On February 22, 2012 McElhinney was traded to the Columbus Blue Jackets (along with second round pick in the 2012 NHL Entry Draft (via Ottawa) and a conditional fifth round selection in the 2013 Draft) for Antoine Vermette.[6] He spent the season with Columbus' AHL affiliate Springfield Falcons and had a fine season, posting nine shutouts to lead the league and set a franchise record for both single season and career shutouts, and was again named to the AHL Second All-Star Team.

He was placed on waivers by the Columbus Blue Jackets January 8, 2017, after allowing 4 straight goals in a 5–4 loss to the New York Rangers on January 7, 2017. He posted a 2–1–2 record and a .924 save percentage in 7 games with the team in the 2016–2017 season.[7] One day after being waived, McElhinney was claimed by the Toronto Maple Leafs, who were in need of a backup goaltender following a disappointing season by Jhonas Enroth.[8]

Down the stretch, McElhinney went 6–7 with 1 shutout, a 2.85 GAA and a .914 save percentage. As starter Frederik Andersen went down with an injury, McElhinney received quite a few extra starts. Most importantly in the second last game of the season for the Leafs with a playoff spot on the line. In this game, McElhinney made arguably the biggest save of his career in the dying seconds on Pittsburgh Penguins captain Sidney Crosby who seemingly had a wide-open net for a one-timer goal. McElhinney slid across the crease to make a pad save and preserved the lead that eventually held up to earn the Leafs a playoff berth.[9]

Carolina Hurricanes/Run to Eastern Conference Finals[edit]

Prior to the 2018–19 season, on October 1, 2018, the Maple Leafs placed McElhinney on waivers after Garret Sparks won the backup goaltending job in the pre-season. His two-year tenure with the Maple Leafs ended as he was claimed by the Carolina Hurricanes the following day, in order to add depth after an injury to Scott Darling.[10] McElhinney would go on to split most of the 2018-19 season in goal with Petr Mrázek.

On May 1, 2019, McElhinney started for the Carolina Hurricanes in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup playoffs versus the New York Islanders in Round 2 making him the oldest goaltender to make his first career playoff start at 35 years and 343 days of age. On May 3, 2019, in Game 4, he helped to secure the franchise's first ever 4–0 sweep in the best-of-seven series.[citation needed]

On July 1, McElhinney signed a two year contract with the Tampa Bay Lightning.[11]

International play[edit]

Following the Leafs first round defeat by the Boston Bruins in the 2018 Stanley Cup playoffs, McElhinney was named to Team Canada to compete at the 2018 IIHF World Championship.[12]

Family[edit]

McElhinney and his wife Ashleigh had their first child, Trenten, in 2009.[13] He also has a daughter named Jaxen.[14] McElhinney has a younger sister, Alana, who played goaltender for the Division I Bemidji State University's women's hockey team.[15]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP W L T/OT MIN GA SO GAA SV% GP W L MIN GA SO GAA SV%
2001–02 Colorado College WCHA 9 6 0 1 441 15 1 2.04 .918
2002–03 Colorado College WCHA 37 25 6 5 2147 85 4 2.37 .906
2003–04 Colorado College WCHA 19 10 6 1 1015 41 2 2.42 .906
2004–05 Colorado College WCHA 25 21 3 1 1490 52 2 2.09 .927
2005–06 Omaha Ak-Sar-Ben Knights AHL 33 9 14 2 1619 68 3 2.52 .912
2006–07 Omaha Ak-Sar-Ben Knights AHL 57 35 17 1 3181 113 7 2.13 .917 5 2 3 311 11 0 2.12 . 914
2007–08 Calgary Flames NHL 5 0 2 0 149 5 0 2.00 .902
2007–08 Quad City Flames AHL 41 20 18 2 2320 88 3 2.28 .911
2008–09 Calgary Flames NHL 14 1 7 0 518 31 0 3.59 .889 1 0 0 34 1 0 1.76 .900
2009–10 Calgary Flames NHL 10 3 4 0 502 27 0 3.22 .885
2009–10 Anaheim Ducks NHL 10 5 1 2 521 24 0 2.76 .917
2010–11 Anaheim Ducks NHL 21 6 9 1 996 57 2 3.43 .890
2010–11 Ottawa Senators NHL 7 3 4 0 399 17 0 2.56 .917
2011–12 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 2 1 0 0 72 2 0 1.67 .944
2011–12 Portland Pirates AHL 25 10 13 0 1379 70 0 3.04 .907
2012–13 Springfield Falcons AHL 49 29 16 3 1349 113 9 2.32 .923 8 3 5 483 25 0 3.10 .895
2013–14 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 28 10 11 1 1423 64 2 2.70 .909
2014–15 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 32 12 14 2 1710 82 0 2.88 .914
2015–16 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 18 2 7 3 836 46 0 3.31 .890
2016–17 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 7 2 1 2 376 15 0 2.39 .924
2016–17 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 14 6 7 0 759 36 1 2.85 .914
2017–18 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 18 11 5 1 980 35 3 2.14 .934 1 0 1 48 4 0 5.07 .826
2018–19 Carolina Hurricanes NHL 33 20 11 2 1978 85 2 2.58 .912 5 3 2 268 9 0 2.01 .930
NHL totals 219 82 82 15 11,219 526 10 2.81 .909 7 3 3 350 14 0 2.30 .921

International[edit]

Year Team Event Result GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA SV%
2018 Canada WC 4th 5 3 2 0 245 6 1 2.02 .936
Senior totals 5 3 2 0 245 6 1 2.02 .936

Awards and honours[edit]

Award Year
College
WCHA First All-Star Team 2002–03
2004–05
[1]
AHCA West Second-Team All-American 2002–03 [1]
AHCA West First-Team All-American 2004–05 [1]
WCHA All-Tournament Team 2005 [16]
AHL
Second All-Star Team 2006–07 [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Curtis McElhinney player profile". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved January 25, 2010.
  2. ^ a b Hanlon, Peter; Kelso, Sean (2009). 2009–10 Calgary Flames Media Guide (PDF). Calgary Flames Hockey Club. p. 74.
  3. ^ Sportak, Randy (April 12, 2009). "McElhinney on fire in Flames victory". Calgary Sun. Retrieved January 25, 2010.
  4. ^ Sportak, Randy (July 25, 2009). "Goin' north nice to Irving". Calgary Sun. Retrieved January 25, 2010.
  5. ^ "Coyotes sign McElhinney to one-year deal". The Sports Network. Retrieved July 4, 2011.
  6. ^ "Blue Jackets trade veteran Vermette to Coyotes". The Sports Network. February 22, 2012. Retrieved February 22, 2012.
  7. ^ http://www.espn.com/nhl/player/_/id/3187/curtis-mcelhinney
  8. ^ "Maple Leafs hope Curtis McElhinney will address backup goalie woes". Toronto Star. January 10, 2017. Retrieved January 12, 2017.
  9. ^ "GOTTA SEE IT: MCELHINNEY ROBS CROSBY FOR "SAVE OF THE SEASON"". sportsnet.ca. April 8, 2017. Retrieved March 18, 2018.
  10. ^ "Canes claim Curtis McElhinney". Carolina Hurricanes. October 2, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  11. ^ "Lightning sign goaltender Curtis McElhinney to two-year contract". NHL.com. July 1, 2019. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  12. ^ "CANADA ADDS PLAYERS TO 2018 IIHF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP CAMP ROSTER". Hockey Canada. April 27, 2017. Retrieved May 7, 2018.
  13. ^ Sportak, Randy (June 6, 2009). "Expecting an in-crease". Calgary Sun. Retrieved October 26, 2011.
  14. ^ Stephens, Eric (January 23, 2011). "McElhinneys welcome a new addition". The Orange County Register. Retrieved April 7, 2018.
  15. ^ Macleod, Robert (October 20, 2017). "Curtis McElhinney finds his groove as backup for the Maple Leafs". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved April 7, 2018.
  16. ^ "WCHA Tourney History". WCHA. Archived from the original on July 2, 2014. Retrieved June 26, 2014.

External links[edit]